Also, once you get to an intermediate level, the above sites will be able to keep you moving forward, all the way to advanced. I only have beginner-intermediate lessons, so I see it as natural progression to move from my lessons to the more advanced lessons of one of the above sites. These 2 sites are the sources I can truly recommend from both quality and cost efficiency point of views.
Hey Jared, I just had a look at Jamorama recently, since they upgraded their offering not long ago. They used to sell a guitar lesson ebook which was created over a decade ago, so it was pretty old to say the least. They launched the new site 2 months ago, and are now focusing on video lessons, just like Jamplay and Guitartricks. I had a good look around Jamorama, and to tell you the truth, it’s not looking very good:
The neck of the guitar adjoins the "body" of the instrument. The body of the guitar will vary greatly from guitar to guitar. Most acoustic and classical guitars have a hollowed out body, and a "sound hole," designed to project the sound of the guitar. Most electric guitars have a solid body, and thus will not have a sound hole. Electric guitars will instead have "pick-ups" where the soundhole is located. These "pick-ups" are essentially small microphones, which allow the capture the sound of the ringing strings, allowing them to be amplified.
Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.
Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.
My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.
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PS If you’ve read this far, then you probably are at least thinking about taking the next step.  Stop thinking about it and doubting in yourself, you want this, so take the action necessary to achieve your goals and  continue towards becoming an amazing rock guitar player right now! You won’t regret at least giving it a try, but you probably will regret it if you don’t.
The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.
I got all involved with Guitar Tricks and bought a full access membership several years ago. Then I spent MUCH more money on “packages” to learn the songs of specific artists (Eagles, Clapton, etc.). Those packages were housed online, but I was supposed to have access forever in return for the rather large sums I was paying. After a few months, I completely got cut off from my packages. They disappeared. No access. I emailed and emailed – no response. I never posted on their chat room, so I couldn’t have said anything that upset them or gave them reason to cut me off. I talked to a lady several times who didn’t help me at all. In fact, she acted like their site is flawless and I must be wrong. No help. I ended up paying them hundreds and getting ripped off. I would warn everyone to proceed with caution.
I’ve always wanted to play a guitar. My wife bought me a Martin about 6 years ago. I’m a truck dri...ver with very limited time at home for any lessons and practice so that hurt my ability. Saw the Chordbuddy on a YouTube video and after researching it, I decided to purchase one figuring that it was worth a shot at that price. I received it on October 7th and tried it for the first time the next day. Within 15 minutes I was playing Tom Dooley. Within an hour I was playing Head Over Boots by John Pardi which is not in any of the Chordbuddy songbooks. I used an app called Tabs and started looking for songs with the 4 chords G,D,C and Em.
One other cool thing about electric guitars– you can plug them into your computer and use a program like Apple’s Garageband as an amplifier. You can basically have 100’s of classic sounds available virtually. You can “jam” virtually with your computer and create full-on recordings on your laptop. You’ll just need a “pre-amp,” which is a device that amplifies the signal from your guitar before it sends it to your computer. I’d recommend something like the Focusrite Scarlett
Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.
Selling to sales people is tough. When I walk into a retail music store and speak to the sales people about ChordBuddy, they scoff… at first. In their heads they have a preconceived notion of what my product is and what it does. They see it as a valueless “cheat” and maybe even a threat to their way of doing things. What they don’t expect is me to be prepared for any objection they can throw at me. I rehearse in the mirror, I practice, I come up with reasons not to buy my product they haven’t even thought of. I am so prepared to swat away objections like flies when I walk into a store, they can’t help but buy from me. Retailers are better equipped to sell my product because a wonderful byproduct of my objection swatting, is that they are now better equipped to sell the product.
Sandercoe's official website, justinguitar.com, was first launched on 31 July 2003 [2] offering lessons as a sample to promote private one on one lessons. The site developed a modest following but once he began making instructional guitar videos for YouTube in December 2006, the site became one of the most popular guitar instruction web sites.[1] As of 2016 there are nearly 1,000 free lessons enjoyed by over 20,000 unique visitors a day from all around the world.

Jim Campilongo on justinguitar.com! Jim Campilongo (www.jimcampilongo.com) "Justin is an instructor with that rare combination that encompasses great playing in conjunction with a thoughtful, likable personality. Justin's instruction is extremely intelligent because he's smart enough to know the 'basics' don't have to be served 'raw' - Justin keenly serves the information covered in chocolate. Justin's site is like a free pass in a candy store!"
I'm real fussy about stuff I endorse, I will NEVER ever say to y'all that I play something if I'm not using it and honestly dig it. I do not get paid to use anything, but I do get discounted or free stuff sometimes. I don't have any exclusive deals and often use things not listed below, I'm a bit of gear slut and not particularly faithful ;) Check them out, all seriously great tools for making happy sounds in your ears!
For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.
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