The first thing I did when I got the Chordbuddy was I took it out of the box and try to attach it to my guitar. Now, I did do some reading up prior to receiving the Chordbuddy and one of the biggest problem that came up was that people just weren’t able to attach it to their guitar properly. Without reading the instructions, I of course, had the same problem. However, once you know how to properly install the Chordbuddy (which I’ll explain in the next section), you should have no troubles.
It’s a shame this app with excellent content is almost unusable. The app’s buttons (back button etc) when in a lesson frequently become unresponsive . The video control buttons disappear randomly. And there is no way to play the videos in landscape mode, which is basic stuff! I am using iPhone 6 with latest iOS. All in all the app quality does grave injustice to the awesome content. At the minimum, the unresponsive buttons, disappearing video controls (pause, forward/rewind, no skip back 10 seconds!) and lack of landscape mode video must be fixed on priority. Eventually the app must rewritten by some quality/experienced app developers and experts in mobile app user interface/experience . The great content in the app deserves better software for presenting it! Had it not been for the awesome content, I would have given it 1 star.

The quality of a few older lessons are subpar, they should just remove those or reshoot them. For example, there is a teacher called Hanspeter Kruesi, who seems like a nice guy, presents useful content, but the 360p lessons shot YouTube style at his house in front of his PC don't live up to my expectations. I'm just talking about a few lessons here, but still.
Private Guitar lessons with a certified TakeLessons teacher are customized to each and every student based on their current skill level, and goals. Beginner students get to practice basic songs, basic exercises, and basic techniques. From there, the difficulty increases in order to properly challenge and motivate intermediate and advanced level guitarists to develop greater skills, to break through their preconceived limitations, and to ultimately get more satisfaction, meaning, and even paid opportunities from the becoming a skilled guitarist.

When my granddaughters were young, Missy worked tirelessly to create lesson plans for my granddaughters in order to keep them interested in music. For example, if my younger granddaughter (3rd grade at the time) was unmotivated to practice in her workbooks at home, Missy would spend part of a lesson just talking with my granddaughter about what music she was currently enjoying. Then Missy would incorporate that music into her lesson plan. As a result, my granddaughter became once again motivated to practice. Missy makes lessons fun while still teaching technique.

Learn the difference between chords and single notes. Chords occur when you play two or more notes on different strings simultaneously to create one unified sound. These are what make up the "rhythm" portion of acoustic music. Single notes are used more for solos and occur when you play a single note at a time. Both are skills that you must become proficient in when learning to play the acoustic guitar.[4]


The idea here is to work on your fretting hand dexterity, but you’ll also want to employ good picking technique. When you get good at the most basic version of this exercise you can move it around the fingerboard and practice it at different frets. You can also vary your fingering to make it more challenging, and you can change up your picking pattern.
Learn how to read tabs. Tabs will have six lines that represent your strings, along with numbers that designate where you should be placing your fingers. The numbers represent the fret in which you need to hold the string down. A 1 means the first fret, a 2 means the second fret, and so on. Numbers in a progression mean that you hold down the first individual fret and pick the note, then move to the next one, and so on in succession. Numbers on the same vertical line are meant to be played together simultaneously as a chord.[10]
For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.
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