Then, play the notes again on the first string, but in reverse order: fourth fret to open string. Then go back to the second string, back to third and all the way back to the sixth string where you started, playing the notes in reverse each time. When you’ve completed the cycle you will have played each note on the first through fourth frets on each string and back again.
The slap technique is most commonly used by bass players. But slapping can also be done on a guitar, typically electric. There are three basic elements to slapping. One is to slap with the thumb of your right hand over the pickups. The second is to slap with multiple fingers of the left hand onto the strings over the fretboard. The third element is to pluck notes using available fingers on the right hand. Using these three elements to make a slap sound, you can combine them in any order to make whatever rhythms you want.

There are many people out there who doubt that they have the ability to play guitar, so let me tell you right away: your hands aren’t too big or too small, you’re not too young or too old, and it doesn’t matter if you want to play electric or acoustic. Everyone has their own challenges, but I’m confident that if you practice and put your mind to it, you can play the guitar.


I know many new guitarists get overwhelmed with a huge barrage of information and give up after a few weeks of practicing out of frustration. However, it doesn’t always have to be like this and learning to play the guitar can be a fun and enjoyable process with the right instructions. And this was the motivation behind the creation of GuitarPlayerWorld.com.
You may have trouble finding a guitar teacher who is on the same wavelength you are on. In other posts I’ve recounted my first experiences with a guitar instructor back when I first started playing. The guy did not seem to care one whit about what kind of music I was into or what my goals were as a new musician. He was going to teach me songs he wanted me to learn, not help me explore music that inspired me. Or perhaps he just thought a kid wearing an Ozzy Osbourne t-shirt would also be into Lionel Richie.
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
The lessons are organized and categorized in several different ways, which is a must, given the number of lessons available. You can search according to skill level (absolute beginner, beginner, easy, intermediate, advanced and extreme), which saves a lot of time because you don’t have to search through lessons that are too easy, too hard, or just not your thing.
"My wife found Chris online for guitar lessons for our 7 year old. After just a few weeks, my 7 year old was doing really cool things with his new guitar. Chris sent us printouts of the weekly lessons so my son could practice during the week. And now I've been learning the lessons too. Any teacher who can keep my son's attention for a full half hour (sometimes he even goes over) AND actually teach him something too is a great teacher!"
If you can't make the chord change from A to E in time with me, don't worry about it. Just leave the chord a little early so that we arrive together on the next chord - this also applies to all the other strum alongs in the course, and even when you are playing by yourself and counting out loud (which you should always do when learning and practicing).

In the world of piano, if a student is learning a piece of music, there can be several different technical variations so that the student can play the music they want without overwhelming themselves with something that is much too difficult. While some of this exists for modern guitar, it tends to be quite limited unless a student is studying classical guitar.


Pinched harmonics are achieved by letting some of the skin of your picking hand touch to the guitar string during or immediately after picking. I personally feel it's easier to pinch harmonics using my index finger but others prefer using the thumb. You'll have to explore a little to find the best spot where pinching a harmonic is most likely to occur. Be warned, pinching harmonics is addictive. Once you find that sweet spot you will most likely make your guitar squeal for days while you perfect the technique.
A few years back, I dusted off the ol' Takamine I got in high school to try some 'music therapy' with my disabled son, who was recovering from a massive at-birth stroke. This reignited my long dormant passion to transform myself from a beach strummer to a 'real' musician; however, as a single mom, taking in-person lessons was financially difficult. Then I found Justinguitar! Flash forward to today; my son is almost fully recovered (YAY!), my guitar collection has grown significantly, and I'm starting to play gigs. None of this would have been possible without your guidance and generosity, Justin. Thank you for being part of the journey!

Along with my massive website revamp in 2018, I am remaking and improving many of the modules in this course so don't be surprised if some bits look a little different :) I'm now dividing the 9 stages of the Beginner course into three grades; white (1), yellow (2) and orange (3). As well as the core lessons with practice routines and song suggestions, each grade will have some related lessons on Ear Training, Rhythm Study, Guitar Maintenance, Practical Music Theory to help you understand how music works!


Travis Perry states that he loves playing music, and that he has taught thousands of people how to play the guitar. He states that it is sad to see thousands of people quit playing the guitar, simply because it is very difficult to master it. According to Travis Perry, the guitar is the most popular instrument in the world, but it is also one of the most frustrating.
I purchased a 1 year sub to JAMPLAY on Christmas day, I’ve known about it for years but what brought me around was their Christmas promotion. $99 for an entire year. I figured this was too good to pass up. PLUS, by the end of my subscription it should be holiday season again and perhaps I will get that great discount again. Not sure if it’s for new subscribers only or not but at any rate, I plan to utilize this site to the absolute fullest because there are things I have wanted to learn my entire life, but wasn’t willing to pay the enormous amount of money to learn it, with JAMPLAY I finally have that opportunity.

NOTE! We get asked all the time why a guitar educational company with so many advanced courses would offer such a simple solution to learning guitar without having to learn how to read music, learn theory or work through a more "formal" learning methodology. The answer is really simple; you never stop learning music but you do have to start. If your introduction to music is boring, tedious and generally a struggle, you'll likely pack the guitar up in its case and stick it in the closet. If it's fun, engaging and you can prove to yourself that you can really do it, then you'll spend a lifetime enjoying and learning guitar. Hopefully, TrueFire and our massive library of instruction will enhance that lifetime of enjoyment.
The filming of the videos is probably the biggest giveaway that this is a free site, as there is no pristine studio, crystal clear audio, or simultaneous multiple camera angles – just Justin sitting wherever he is that day, playing his guitar, and showing you what to do. It’s certainly not bad, but obviously lacks the polish of the paid-for tutorial sites.
Through School of Rock's private guitar lessons and group rehearsals, children learn to play the guitar and eventually perform the songs they love in a fun, supportive and comfortable atmosphere. Based on the student's age and skill level, guitar lessons for kids are part of every School of Rock music program including Rookies, Rock 101, Performance, House Band, and AllStars.

* Detune dive bomb - A.K.A. Poor man's dive bomb. On guitars with non locking string nuts, you can simulate a dive bomb by turning the tuning key of the low E string down while the note is ringing. This trick is great when used on hard tail bridge guitars with no floating tremolos. You'll have to know how to tune a guitar by ear if you intend to use this trick frequently.

Use tabs instead of sheet music. If you don't already know how to read music, it can take a lot of time to memorize and proficiently read sheet music. Tabs are an easier and more intuitive way to write music for beginners that doesn't require any formal education. Tabs will simply tell you where to put your fingers on a fret board and how to generally play a song.[9]


I bet that you’ve even tried other methods to figure it out. Spending hours on YouTube and google searching for some guitar method that will get you to the level you want, just to get bogged down in the TRUCKLOADS of seemingly unrelated material… Getting some friends that play guitar to show you something here and there, learning some songs off of tabs that are sometimes right and sometimes terribly, terribly wrong just to find that you’re stuck playing the same old things without knowing what to do next.
For students who have long thought about picking up the acoustic or electric guitar, this course will provide an easy-access foundation that will get you playing. When first learning guitar, it is important to have the material presented in stages, in an enjoyable way that allows you to grasp the basics of the instrument and music. The course begins simply with the parts of the guitar, the names of the strings, tuning, and technique—whether finger-style or pick. It then explores the basics of music theory with such topics as scales, triads, power chords, and fingering and shapes.
The web has a vast number of resources available for learning how to play guitar. You can learn how to play fancy scales, play songs, learn to solo, and much more. The trouble is, there just aren't many good guitar lessons available to someone looking to start playing guitar. These guitar lessons are designed for people who own (or have borrowed) a guitar, but don't yet know the first thing about playing it.

My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.
other subjects are just really introduced but not deeply covered : example for picking techniques, alternate tuning, etc. There is a lesson about circle of fifths for example and it was just not well explained, I sometimes struggle with chris schelegel videos, as he talks super fast and over complicates stuff, so I ended browsing he internet to try understanding some of the stuff he talked about, and then I found much more information on websites and way better explained…
Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.
"My daughter is taking Skype guitar lessons with Daniel. It's going great. She improves every week. Daniel is able to adjust his lessons to her learning style. His awareness and flexibility has contributed greatly to her learning. The Skype experience is fine, I think my daughter concentrates better with Skype because there is nothing distracting her from her instruction. Also, Daniel is great about following up with practice and providing practice videos. I highly recommend Daniel for guitar lessons. His online instruction is fun for my daughter and provides a complete learning experience."

This is a $25 complimentary, promotional gift card that can be used on any product at www.sharperimage.com.This card will be delivered along with your purchased items, in the brown shipping box. It will not be replaced if lost or stolen. This card will not be exchangeable for cash, except where required by law. Other conditions may apply. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or discount code. This promotional gift card does expire. Please see the back of your promotional gift card for your unique redemption code, expiration date, and complete terms and conditions.
I concur, lots of very good lessons on Guitar Tricks. However, one thing I don’t see commented on is that for most of the song lessons and some technical lessons you cannot download and print the music (which I understand for published songs because it is protected) but the on-screen music notation doesn’t scroll with the video lesson, jam track etc. (like it does on several other lesson sites). All that is visible is one 8 or 12 bar section of the song. In other words, short of memorizing the song, there is no way to play along. Made the comment to GT customer support and they said essentially – Yeah we know. My analogy is a canoe without a paddle. Not totally useless but almost.

Hi there, that’s a good question, I had to go into my accounts on jamplay and guitartricks to look around for you. It looks to me like Jamplay has more fingerstyle lessons, they even have dedicated courses on various subgenres of fingerstyle guitar. So if you are at an intermediate level already, and want start “mastering” fingerstyle guitar, I would recommend Jamplay. If you’re still a beginner, than it would be best if you reach an intermediate level first on Guitartricks, so you are well rounded in everything guitar. I always recommend that specializing towards any given genre should come after you have a solid knowledge of the basics, and are comfortable with anything they throw at you 🙂
After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.

Whilst the experienced lessons focus on the three genres specifically to take you from basic to advanced, further genres are accessed below in a tab called 'Styles'. (This is the same webpage accessed by the 4th area called 'Learn Styles of Guitar' on the home page.) The additional genres are Acoustic, Bluegrass, Classical, Funk and Soul, Jazz, Metal, Rockabilly, Surf, and finally, World.
The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
Hopefully, you've found, bought or borrowed a guitar pick. If not, you'll need to buy yourself some. Don't be stingy, go and pick up at least 10 of them — guitar picks are easy to lose (they often don't cost more than 30 or 40 cents each). You can experiment with different shapes and brands, but I highly recommend medium gauge picks to start; ones that aren't too flimsy, or too hard.
Minutes 30-60. Practice making the basic 5 shapes. This is probably the hardest part. You gotta put your head down for 30 minutes and remember the chords that are demonstrated below. Once you start getting these shapes down, adding to your portfolio will be easy. You can even experiment with adding and removing fingers– you’ll find a lot of cool sounds here and you’ll continue to discover these for years to come.
×