Steve Vai on justinguitar.com! Steve Vai (www.vai.com) "I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself."
It’s a shame this app with excellent content is almost unusable. The app’s buttons (back button etc) when in a lesson frequently become unresponsive . The video control buttons disappear randomly. And there is no way to play the videos in landscape mode, which is basic stuff! I am using iPhone 6 with latest iOS. All in all the app quality does grave injustice to the awesome content. At the minimum, the unresponsive buttons, disappearing video controls (pause, forward/rewind, no skip back 10 seconds!) and lack of landscape mode video must be fixed on priority. Eventually the app must rewritten by some quality/experienced app developers and experts in mobile app user interface/experience . The great content in the app deserves better software for presenting it! Had it not been for the awesome content, I would have given it 1 star.
Ideally, most people would prefer to be able to take lessons in the style of music that they enjoy the most, and that is one of the things you will get with Guitar Tricks. This will enable you to learn just about every level of guitar skill and technique for any type of music. According to a vast number of past and current students who have experienced this type of training, “…it is the best way to learn!”
If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.
* Visualization - Learn faster by using visualization techniques. In other words, see yourself / imagine yourself doing what you want to be able to do. Try to recreate the images of you completing a recent guitar lesson you have had or a guitar related task in your mind as clearly as possible. Visualization is proven to increase the time it takes to learn a subject because it tricks your brain into thinking it already knows how to do things.
Learning the notes on your guitar fretboard is one of the most important things you can do to advance your guitar playing skills. Knowing this information opens up an enormous amount of possibilities and can greatly help ease the learning curve for future guitar exercises. From scales, to soloing, to chord positions / progressions, knowing where each guitar note without having to think about it will put you well ahead of other guitarists who have not mastered this yet. This guide will give you some background information regarding how the notes on your guitar fretboard are laid out and of

School of Rock has a finely-tuned preschoolers program called Little Wing that offers all the benefits of our beginner lessons, but is tailored to capture the attention of these young students and set them on a path towards music proficiency. Through playful exploration of rhythm, song structure, and melody kids are introduced to the guitar and other instruments.


In their quest to innovate, I think JamPlay really took the camera angle thing overboard. Sometimes they show so many angles of hands on the screen, that it can get confusing and not intuitive at all. There is an camera angle which I really dislike, the "teacher angle", which is a camera above the teacher aiming at his fretting hand. Mixing angles of the same hand on a screen is not cool, I literally get dizzy watching it.

Next, concentrate on your "fretting hand" (the hand closest to the neck of the guitar, when sitting in proper position). The thumb of your fretting hand should rest behind the neck of the guitar, with your fingers in a slightly curled position, poised above the strings. It is extremely important to keep these fingers curled at the knuckles, except when specifically instructed not to do so.


Strum your guitar with a pick or your fingers. Hold down the strings with your fingers in the appropriate shape and try to strum with your other hand. Acoustic guitar strings often have higher actions than electric guitars, so you may have to press down very hard to get a good sound. If the chord comes out muted, try holding down the strings with more force. If your string is buzzing, move your finger further away from the metal fret on your neck.[7]

What you see on this page is the heart of Guitar Tricks’ presentation and is used to display all video content. The interface is smooth and intuitive, allowing you to use and see almost all of the content above the fold (without having to scroll down). The video player itself offers some different resolution options as well as a looping feature that allows you to repeat certain portions of the video.

After teaching guitar and music theory to thousands of students over past three decades, I thought that I had basically 'seen it all' when it comes to guitar instruction. Then I discovered Justin’s website, and man was I impressed! Justin’s caring spirit, attention to detail, vast knowledge base, and especially his lucid, laidback and nurturing style, allow students to fall in love with the learning process. You see, it’s not enough to simply find out how to play a few cool licks or chords. A truly great teacher will make you fall in love with the process of discovery so that you can unlock the best within you. Justin is one of these great teachers, and I highly recommend justinguitar.com to anyone who wants to tap into their best selves.
Learn the difference between chords and single notes. Chords occur when you play two or more notes on different strings simultaneously to create one unified sound. These are what make up the "rhythm" portion of acoustic music. Single notes are used more for solos and occur when you play a single note at a time. Both are skills that you must become proficient in when learning to play the acoustic guitar.[4]
"My wife found Chris online for guitar lessons for our 7 year old. After just a few weeks, my 7 year old was doing really cool things with his new guitar. Chris sent us printouts of the weekly lessons so my son could practice during the week. And now I've been learning the lessons too. Any teacher who can keep my son's attention for a full half hour (sometimes he even goes over) AND actually teach him something too is a great teacher!"
In the “classical” world, composers would oftentimes write musical studies called “etudes.” These pieces would generally be musically pleasing, but the sole purpose was to develop an instrumentalist’s playing technique. Examples of these can be seen in classical guitar music, where many pieces have the same right hand arpeggio pattern that remains constant throughout the entire piece.
I am a beginner- I learned more in a week of using Guitar Tricks than I did in two weeks of apps that listen to you play. The instructions are excellent- well presented and easy to understand. My 12 year old and I are learning together- me on a nylon string acoustic and him on an electric and the lessons are well suited to both of us. The only thing that keeps me from putting a 5 is that the app could use options for some of the things available on the full website such as the tools and being able to mark lessons as complete. It would also be a great feature if the music sheets would scroll down with the songs as they are played - songs that are copyrighted can’t be printed which means it is impossible to play along without memorizing the song.
Minutes 30-60. Practice making the basic 5 shapes. This is probably the hardest part. You gotta put your head down for 30 minutes and remember the chords that are demonstrated below. Once you start getting these shapes down, adding to your portfolio will be easy. You can even experiment with adding and removing fingers– you’ll find a lot of cool sounds here and you’ll continue to discover these for years to come.
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