Beginner to advanced, acoustic to electric, blues to country... we have the guitar lessons you need to move your playing forward. We consistently film, edit and publish around 11 hours of new guitar lessons every 30 days; an enormous amount of material to keep your playing focused and interests piqued. With new lessons added on a daily basis, you cannot find another company as dedicated to teaching you how to play guitar as JamPlay.

I was lucky enough to meet Justin at the Guitar Institute during a summer school in 2004, and to have some private lessons with him afterwards.  He was the teacher who kickstarted my guitar career and persuaded me that I was ready to join a band.  That was 14 years ago and many dozens of gigs later.  I’m now just finishing a degree in Popular Music Performance.  Justin's online lessons are easy to follow and he has a manner about him which makes you believe that you can achieve.  Where he demonstrates songs, I have found his versions to be consistently more accurate and easy to follow than those of any other online teacher.  On this website you really will find all the skills and information you need to become an excellent musician.  Many thanks. Ian.
I was lucky enough to meet Justin at the Guitar Institute during a summer school in 2004, and to have some private lessons with him afterwards.  He was the teacher who kickstarted my guitar career and persuaded me that I was ready to join a band.  That was 14 years ago and many dozens of gigs later.  I’m now just finishing a degree in Popular Music Performance.  Justin's online lessons are easy to follow and he has a manner about him which makes you believe that you can achieve.  Where he demonstrates songs, I have found his versions to be consistently more accurate and easy to follow than those of any other online teacher.  On this website you really will find all the skills and information you need to become an excellent musician.  Many thanks. Ian.
You may have trouble finding a guitar teacher who is on the same wavelength you are on. In other posts I’ve recounted my first experiences with a guitar instructor back when I first started playing. The guy did not seem to care one whit about what kind of music I was into or what my goals were as a new musician. He was going to teach me songs he wanted me to learn, not help me explore music that inspired me. Or perhaps he just thought a kid wearing an Ozzy Osbourne t-shirt would also be into Lionel Richie.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that students learn faster when taking private guitar lessons or classes, compared to watching video tutorials or YouTube videos. Finding a specialized teacher - whether in-home, studio, or online classes - for one-on-one guitar tutoring will give you the feedback and personal attention you need to become the best guitar player you can be!

Given that there are not too many one chord songs, this won't be the most rewarding moment of the course! However, that's okay because good things come to those who wait, and I won't make you wait too much longer! Nevertheless, if you can sing a melody while strumming the A chord, you'll start to hear the musicality of what you have already learned.
While four years old is a little young for formal guitar lessons, it's not too early to begin teaching your child musical concepts that will be important once they are old enough for guitar instruction at School of Rock. Your 4-year-old can participate in the Little Wing music program to learn fundamental concepts through fun, dynamic musical activities. 
It’s important to realize there is a fine line between challenging yourself with music that is slightly above your ability, and frustrating yourself with music you have no logical reason to expect yourself to be able to play just yet. This line is different for each new guitarist. Some may work on basic chords for years, and be happy enough with that. Others may dive neck-deep into some fairy difficult music and thrive on the challenge it provides. Point is, go at your own pace, and don’t ever feel like you need to take on more of a challenge than you are ready for.
The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.

Now we're getting somewhere! In order to become skillful on the guitar, we'll need to build the muscles in our hands, and learn to stretch our fingers. Scales are a good, albeit a not very exciting way to do this. Before we start, look at the diagram above to understand how fingers on the "fretting hand" (the hand that plays notes on the neck) are commonly identified. The thumb is labeled as "T", the index finger is the "first finger", the middle finger is the "second finger", and so on.
Secondly, you are going to build up a vocabulary of basic chords. This should include mastering open-form A, C, D, E, F and G Major chords, as well as open-form minors such as Am, Em, Dm and even some easy 7th chords. You should learn to play “power chords” (which actually aren’t chords at all) as well as the most commonly used movable barre shapes such as A, Am, E and Em.
In their quest to innovate, I think JamPlay really took the camera angle thing overboard. Sometimes they show so many angles of hands on the screen, that it can get confusing and not intuitive at all. There is an camera angle which I really dislike, the "teacher angle", which is a camera above the teacher aiming at his fretting hand. Mixing angles of the same hand on a screen is not cool, I literally get dizzy watching it.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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