Ideally, most people would prefer to be able to take lessons in the style of music that they enjoy the most, and that is one of the things you will get with Guitar Tricks. This will enable you to learn just about every level of guitar skill and technique for any type of music. According to a vast number of past and current students who have experienced this type of training, “…it is the best way to learn!”

For students who have long thought about picking up the acoustic or electric guitar, this course will provide an easy-access foundation that will get you playing. When first learning guitar, it is important to have the material presented in stages, in an enjoyable way that allows you to grasp the basics of the instrument and music. The course begins simply with the parts of the guitar, the names of the strings, tuning, and technique—whether finger-style or pick. It then explores the basics of music theory with such topics as scales, triads, power chords, and fingering and shapes.
Hold your guitar correctly. When you are sitting down, there are two main ways to hold your guitar. For a casual playing style, lay the guitar over your dominant leg. On the other hand, the classical method has you set your guitar on your non-dominant leg. In both instances, make sure that the guitar is held close against your body. Holding your guitar properly makes it easier to play and prevents you from becoming fatigued. Play around with both styles and figure out which one is most comfortable for you.[2]
What can be done so that students can play the music they want and build a strong technical foundation? Taking guitar lessons is a great approach. A good guitar instructor can analyze a song a student is wanting to learn, arrange it so that it is playable at a student’s current technical level, and then develop exercises to aid in playing that song.
Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.
We were privileged to have worked with hundreds of top artists and educators who authored the original magazine articles and then recorded audio lessons in their own studios. While video is the medium of choice today, these 1,200+ audio lessons still deliver amazing instruction from some of the best in the biz — perfect for those long drives and commutes!
To quote Alec Baldwin's character in the movie The Edge: What one man can do another can do. He was only trying to kill a Grizzly Bear with a stick, which may seem easier than copping Eddie Van Halen. Paraphrasing and putting this in terms that work for us: What one guitar player can do another can do. Really, the deciding factor is how hard you want to work at it.
This course aims to get you ready to play the guitar as soon as possible, so we only cover the absolute essentials. Learn how to maintain your guitar and gain the basics to play both lead and rhythm guitar. This is great for those who have played some guitar in the past but want to brush up the basics. For complete beginners, try our Introduction to Guitar Playing course.
Electric guitar: Well the world of electric guitars is in some ways more complex, as there are all kinds of different looks and technologies. And it’s not good enough to just have a guitar, you need to buy an amplifier as well. I will just recommend mid-level stuff that’s worked for me based on my preferences, but if you like “stuff” and collecting gear, you’ll find playing the guitar to be a deeply satisfying hobby :)
Tapping is a technique where the right hand taps a string and alternates with notes played by the left hand. A basic way you can start tapping is to find three notes that you want to play on one string and play them as triplets using this sequence: tap, pull-off, pull-off. The first note is tapped with your index or middle finger and then pulls-off onto a note held by one of the left hand fingers, which is then pulled-off onto another note held by a left hand finger. Other ways to tap are to use more right hand fingers, use open strings, and to use different rhythms.
These last two tabs feel a little bit out of place, and it’s hard to tell whether or not this is content that you will also get if you go through the Guitar Fundamentals course. On the surface, this appears to give you the opportunity to go through a quick intro with the Practice for Beginners and Tuning & Guitar Maintenance tabs, or to jump into a more lengthy process with the Core Learning System.
There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe.
Did my research over a number of months to decide where my learning hub would be. Guitar tricks won in spades, easy thought out lessons that are short and to the point I also like that so far the videos a only a few mins a piece. Trusted guitar tricks that had no hesitation in subscribing for a yearly sub.my guitar arrives in a few days, cannot wait to take advantage of this brilliant site.

Learn how to read tabs. Tabs will have six lines that represent your strings, along with numbers that designate where you should be placing your fingers. The numbers represent the fret in which you need to hold the string down. A 1 means the first fret, a 2 means the second fret, and so on. Numbers in a progression mean that you hold down the first individual fret and pick the note, then move to the next one, and so on in succession. Numbers on the same vertical line are meant to be played together simultaneously as a chord.[10]
Guitar Center Shreveport provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Shreveport area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Shreveport can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.

Throughout the Beginner Guitar Quick-Start Series, we’ll include the most important things you need to know be successful at playing guitar right away. First we’ll cover basics like how to tune your guitar, how to hold your guitar, and the parts of the guitar. After that, we’ll get into technique, how to strum, how to make your first chords, and how to play your first song.
For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.
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