"Our son loves his guitar lessons and wants to play. He's the real deal with his own gigs and he teaches using music we love. Garrick gets 5 stars because he unexpectedly requested to join us when we purchased our guitar, picked an appropriate used(!) one with metal strings and had it modified to bring the frets in closer for small fingers. His lessons feel customized. We recommend Garrick!"
Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
Sound familiar? I know what that’s like… I’ve been there, and I’ve had several students that have been there. Playing the same licks, the same riffs, the same songs on your guitar over and over and over again just gets old so fast.  You’re willing to put in the work, you’re willing to practice hard, BUT WHAT SHOULD YOU PRACTICE?? HOW CAN I LEARN TO BE CREATIVE? IF ONLY I COULD PLAY THAT ONE SOLO!

Wow, cool video man, uber informative. It’s interesting to see the side by side like this. I haven’t quite decided which site I’m gonna go with, but I’m leaning more towards guitartricks right now. I used to play a bit when I was younger, so I’m basically restarting the guitar, and those quick to the point lessons from guitartricks come off as a nice way of relearning everything I had long forgotten. I also want to learn Beatles songs, and it looks like only gutartricks has those.


@John Dyhouse: The thing about the chord buddy that is unique is that you can teach yourself quickly. yes you will need to build up your finger pad but you will need to do that anyway without the chord buddy. The main purpose of it is to teach you hand placement, sound, and rythmn first. Then after you have mastered that you can move on to learning more on the topic you are discussing.
3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.

One other cool thing about electric guitars– you can plug them into your computer and use a program like Apple’s Garageband as an amplifier. You can basically have 100’s of classic sounds available virtually. You can “jam” virtually with your computer and create full-on recordings on your laptop. You’ll just need a “pre-amp,” which is a device that amplifies the signal from your guitar before it sends it to your computer. I’d recommend something like the Focusrite Scarlett


The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
My original thesis behind my site was (and still is), that I want to create lessons that will make people fall in love with the guitar, and get them motivated to play real songs. I think I’m good at creating high quality lessons that beginners will enjoy and draw enthusiasm from, but the thing is that I am a one man show at TheGuitarLesson.com, and there are only so many lessons I can produce, while Jamplay and Guitartricks are “big” companies, pumping out new content non-stop.
The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
* Finger tapping - Made popular by Eddie Van Halen (listen to Eruption), finger tapping is one of the easiest guitar tricks to learn that will make you sound like you are playing something totally complex even though you are not. To finger tap, use a finger of your guitar picking hand to play notes on the fretboard by pressing notes down then pulling them off to notes of the fretting hand. It's common to use the middle finger for tapping so that you can keep a hold of the guitar pick.
We now know three chords: G major, C major, and D major. Let's see if we can put them to use in a song. At first, switching chords will take far too long to be able to play any songs properly. Don't give up, though! With a bit of practice, you'll be playing away, sounding great (this tutorial on switching chords quickly might also be of some help). In our next lesson, we'll start learning about strumming, so you can come back to these songs, and be able to play them better.
Steve Vai on justinguitar.com! Steve Vai (www.vai.com) "I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself."
By the end of these 12 lessons, you’ll know how to hold the guitar, identify the parts of the acoustic and electric guitar, tune the guitar, play four important guitar chords, strum the guitar, and even combine all these things to play your very first song. Getting into playing music right away is going to be great motivation to get you going. Once you've completed these lessons you’ll have a solid foundation for your future guitar playing and you’ll have a good idea of what you should work on next.
Justin, first off I just wanted to say thanks for all the advice and instruction. You make playing guitar easy and understandable and fun. You explain very well the hows and whys when presenting a new song to learn and walk it through so that anyone can learn. I have played guitar for 20 years now and have learned more from you in the last five years than the previous 15 by myself. You have also been a tremendous help to both my son and my daughter in learning to play as well by making playing fun and interesting. I have a couple of pictures of me and my children all doing what we love. Many Thanks to you Justin
The first thing I did when I got the Chordbuddy was I took it out of the box and try to attach it to my guitar. Now, I did do some reading up prior to receiving the Chordbuddy and one of the biggest problem that came up was that people just weren’t able to attach it to their guitar properly. Without reading the instructions, I of course, had the same problem. However, once you know how to properly install the Chordbuddy (which I’ll explain in the next section), you should have no troubles.
Instead of spoon feeding you information in a way that you are eternally dependent on your lessons as many do, we want to help you become an independent learner so that you not only continue learning guitar and growing your skills for the rest of your life.. but that you also develop into your own type of guitar player with your own sound and playing style.  The way that we structure each student’s curriculum purposefully helps to encourage perpetual growth and learning so that you will continually become the most awesome musician that you can be, even when you aren’t at your lessons!

The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.

I decided to try to learn how to play the guitar so I could sing and play with my preschool class. I was getting very frustrated because my fingers would not do what I want them to do. I put the chord buddy on my guitar and could play a dozen songs the first night. Just wish they made more of these in different keys so I did not have to re-key the songs I want to be able to play. It will take some practice because you do have to press down on the tabs very hard to get a clear not so need to build up some more strength in my left hand so the strings don't twang.


The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
The slap technique is most commonly used by bass players. But slapping can also be done on a guitar, typically electric. There are three basic elements to slapping. One is to slap with the thumb of your right hand over the pickups. The second is to slap with multiple fingers of the left hand onto the strings over the fretboard. The third element is to pluck notes using available fingers on the right hand. Using these three elements to make a slap sound, you can combine them in any order to make whatever rhythms you want.
Justin, first off I just wanted to say thanks for all the advice and instruction. You make playing guitar easy and understandable and fun. You explain very well the hows and whys when presenting a new song to learn and walk it through so that anyone can learn. I have played guitar for 20 years now and have learned more from you in the last five years than the previous 15 by myself. You have also been a tremendous help to both my son and my daughter in learning to play as well by making playing fun and interesting. I have a couple of pictures of me and my children all doing what we love. Many Thanks to you Justin
* Detune dive bomb - A.K.A. Poor man's dive bomb. On guitars with non locking string nuts, you can simulate a dive bomb by turning the tuning key of the low E string down while the note is ringing. This trick is great when used on hard tail bridge guitars with no floating tremolos. You'll have to know how to tune a guitar by ear if you intend to use this trick frequently.
There are hundreds of free guitar lessons here and it's taken a lot of work over nearly 15 years for me to create it all. It's important to me to help everyone that wants to learn to play the guitar, not just those with money for tuition, so I run it on an "honour system" and I rely on the honesty of users like your good self to make a donation if they can afford to.
Depending on the program, School of Rock's guitar lessons can cost from around $150 to $350 per month. Exact prices vary between locations. What's included? Unlike most hourly guitar lessons, our programs include weekly private guitar lessons and group rehearsals that inspire confidence and teamwork. Guitar students are also welcome to use our facilities whenever we're open, even if they just want to hangout and learn from or collaborate with other musicians.

Ideally, most people would prefer to be able to take lessons in the style of music that they enjoy the most, and that is one of the things you will get with Guitar Tricks. This will enable you to learn just about every level of guitar skill and technique for any type of music. According to a vast number of past and current students who have experienced this type of training, “…it is the best way to learn!”

While Courses are a great way to learn guitar on your own, sometimes you need personalized feedback or private lessons from top guitar instructors in order to bust out of that rut or step your guitar playing up to the next level. With no pressure nor scheduling issues, TrueFire Online Classrooms are the best way to take private guitar lessons online!


We believe that Guitar practice as an adult is more productive than it seems because it clears your head, it builds patience, discipline and concentration skills which you can transfer over to other parts of life, and it keeps your hand-eye coordination sharp. It also keeps you committed to learning and improvement, which again, are transferable traits to professional life. As role models, parents taking active classes shows kids the importance of pursuing personal interests for life.


* Finger tapping - Made popular by Eddie Van Halen (listen to Eruption), finger tapping is one of the easiest guitar tricks to learn that will make you sound like you are playing something totally complex even though you are not. To finger tap, use a finger of your guitar picking hand to play notes on the fretboard by pressing notes down then pulling them off to notes of the fretting hand. It's common to use the middle finger for tapping so that you can keep a hold of the guitar pick.
It’s important to realize there is a fine line between challenging yourself with music that is slightly above your ability, and frustrating yourself with music you have no logical reason to expect yourself to be able to play just yet. This line is different for each new guitarist. Some may work on basic chords for years, and be happy enough with that. Others may dive neck-deep into some fairy difficult music and thrive on the challenge it provides. Point is, go at your own pace, and don’t ever feel like you need to take on more of a challenge than you are ready for.
There’s plenty of people with small hands who play the guitar. Nine times out of ten smaller people confuse the terrible awkwardness that comes with the first week of playing the guitar and mistakenly think it’s because their hands are small. Again, you’re teaching your hands to do really strange movements here. Imagine going to an advanced yoga class having never stretched before, that’s basically what you’re doing.
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