The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.

* Pull off harmonic - Pull off harmonics are used frequently in Rock and Metal. Achieving one is a two step process where you first pull off to an open string with first finger then quickly touch the harmonic at around the 3rd of 4th fret. The result is a high pitched harmonic. This trick works best on the 3rd string. Add a whammy bar dive bomb for maximum effect and sustain.
Hi there, thanks for the kind words. The beginner’s guide I created is thorough, nothing is held back. The advantage Jamplay and Guitartricks have is that they are absolutely huge sites, with loads more lessons than I will ever be able to publish on my own site. This starts becoming important when you get to an intermediate level, and need more variety. But at first, my free beginner’s guitar guide is enough indeed.
I have been studying guitar off and on since age 10. I have had several instructors over the years but most of them didn't have a solid game plan, a horizon or timeline toward getting to the next level. Plus it was expensive. As technology evolved more Youtube videos came online. I tried teaching myself from the videos but the process and information was fragmented. Watching them felt like lessons from those in person instructors. I googled best online guitar courses and found Guitartricks rated at the top so I took a chance. I will tell you this, if you have the patience and dedication, and follow the course, especially Fundamentals I and II, you will be amazed at how quickly you will advance. As with any endeavor worth undertaking, it isn't easy. But, my instructor, Lisa McCormick, developed the Core system and she nailed it. Her gentle nudging even paced approach has helped me improve my playing and understanding of the guitar way beyond my expectations. The Guitartricks system is every bit a road map to get you from beginner to advanced, or if you choose, to be able to play some songs if that's your goal. A well thought out intuitive interface to navigate through your journey toward playing guitar. Two thumbs up Guitartricks!!!
I would especially like to stress the gentle approach Justin takes with two key aspects that contributed to my development as a musician - music theory and ear training. Justin has succeeded in conveying the importance and profoundness of understanding music both theoretically and through your ears while maintaining a simple and accessible approach to them, all while sticking to what is ultimately the most important motto: 'If it sounds good, it is good'.

Hold your guitar correctly. When you are sitting down, there are two main ways to hold your guitar. For a casual playing style, lay the guitar over your dominant leg. On the other hand, the classical method has you set your guitar on your non-dominant leg. In both instances, make sure that the guitar is held close against your body. Holding your guitar properly makes it easier to play and prevents you from becoming fatigued. Play around with both styles and figure out which one is most comfortable for you.[2]
What can be done so that students can play the music they want and build a strong technical foundation? Taking guitar lessons is a great approach. A good guitar instructor can analyze a song a student is wanting to learn, arrange it so that it is playable at a student’s current technical level, and then develop exercises to aid in playing that song.
Saw you with the Pure and Simple Band at The Terrace at Grove Park the evening of Dec. 13. I am wondering if you attended Enterprise Jr College years ago. I was secretary to Tommy Johnson, Dean of Students, from 1977-1993 and am wondering if you were one of our bus drivers. When the band leader introduced the band members, your name stuck in my head.
After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.

Here you'll find the JustinGuitar range of books. Method Books include The Beginner's Course and the Intermediate Method. Songbooks include the Beginner Songbook (our biggest seller, over 100,000 copies sold), Volume 2 (an equal, not a sequel!) and a selection of Intermediate Level Songbooks in various styles: Acoustic, Rock, Pop and Vintage (hits from the 60's-80's). These start with "Beginner Plus" which are great for Beginner's consolidating their knowledge and then move onto songs using barre chords and more complex techniques for Intermediate players. There's also a Beginner Ukulele Songbook! I just have one Transcription Book at the moment, the Blues Lead Guitar Solos Book, but more are in the works. Due to the popularity of my site in Germany, we have two titles translated into German!

 Jim Campilongo on justinguitar.com! Jim Campilongo (www.jimcampilongo.com) "Justin is an instructor with that rare combination that encompasses great playing in conjunction with a thoughtful, likable personality. Justin's instruction is extremely intelligent because he's smart enough to know the 'basics' don't have to be served 'raw' - Justin keenly serves the information covered in chocolate. Justin's site is like a free pass in a candy store!"

The filming of the videos is probably the biggest giveaway that this is a free site, as there is no pristine studio, crystal clear audio, or simultaneous multiple camera angles – just Justin sitting wherever he is that day, playing his guitar, and showing you what to do. It’s certainly not bad, but obviously lacks the polish of the paid-for tutorial sites.
My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.
Contrary to some other reviewers of this book, I like the book's set-up. New chords are given at the beginning at each stage only. There isn't a section that gives you chord diagrams so it forces you to memorize chord diagrams as you progress through the book rather than rely on convenient chord diagrams above every lyric. It isn't a chord reference book so if you're looking for that, there are plenty of cheap ones on Amazon or even free on the internet.
Electric guitar: Well the world of electric guitars is in some ways more complex, as there are all kinds of different looks and technologies. And it’s not good enough to just have a guitar, you need to buy an amplifier as well. I will just recommend mid-level stuff that’s worked for me based on my preferences, but if you like “stuff” and collecting gear, you’ll find playing the guitar to be a deeply satisfying hobby :)
Start playing the different notes and hold the different shapes. Once you have a basic understanding of how the notes are played throughout the song, you can start to hold each of the chords. If the song consists of chords that you're used to playing, it will make the process easier. If the song uses different chords, it may take some time and adjustment to get used to them. Practice the chords separately if they are unfamiliar to you.[12]
The lessons are organized and categorized in several different ways, which is a must, given the number of lessons available. You can search according to skill level (absolute beginner, beginner, easy, intermediate, advanced and extreme), which saves a lot of time because you don’t have to search through lessons that are too easy, too hard, or just not your thing.
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
For many people who pick up the guitar for the first time, learning scales is often not at the top of their priority list. This is normal and as a beginner guitarist, there is other more important foundation knowledge that should first be acquired. However, at the point when you start learning scales as a guitarist is when you know you’re starting to get serious about playing. Learning guitar scales is a fantastic way to practice your technique and theory. Scales also come in handy for a variety of purposes such as: Writing music Improvising/jamming with others Understanding how music

I have a nerve problem in my left hand which causes numbness and pain; therefore, I cannot use my fingers on the strings. The Chordbuddy is very helpful for those who have physical hand issues. All I want to do is enjoy playing my guitar at home and don't expect to become an expert. the Chordbuddy has given me back the joy of playing for my own enjoyment.


The layout and scope of Guitar Tricks’ content is perfect for those who want to get into a system quickly and start playing guitar as soon as possible. There’s room to grow and the content isn’t all just for beginners. However, the ideal member, those who I’d bet would be most happy with their membership, will be on the beginner’s side of the guitar looking for a time-sensitive way to learn.
After the 3 Stages, we have an Essential Skills module which you could check out any time you want - it's stuff that you'll find super helpful on your journey :) You'll probably find my Practical Music Theory course super fun if you're the type who likes to understand what they're doing - it's not essential for beginners but most people seem to really enjoy it!

First: I am now 73 years on this earth. Last February I decided to try learning some about guitar playing. For me it was like one of those things i'd thought about a lot but never made the time to pursue. Then I thought I might be to old to add new talent to this body. After reading and viewing a lot of information on line and contact with a local teaching facility I decided to give Guitartricks a try. I am a DIY person and if given good instruction am able to learn quickly. I found the instruction at Guitartricks to be very clear and concise so I was able to quickly put the instructions into practice. I started with Lisa McCormick who made me familiar with the basics and led me clearly to achieve my goals of being able to entertain family and myself. I have Arthritis in my hands so some of the four finger and Bar cords are just out of reach for me. That has not stopped me from learning the basic cords and having a whale of a time playing with those. Surprised me at just how many songs you can keep up with using only a few cords! Guitartricks offers a whole lot for your money and always offers extra help if you have a need for some. They offer one on one, and group sessions if you are inclined. The instructors are great people who care about you being able to achieve your personal goals with guitar. I owe special thanks to Lisa McCormick, Caren Armstrong, and Anders Mouridsen. If you want to learn guitar, and are willing to apply the time needed for practice, Guitartricks is the place. Take it from this old kid you're never to old to learn some new tricks. Thank You,


Each song is very well laid out and easy to understand, especially for beginners. It is recommended to play these songs along with a metronome so that you can also practice your tempo and rhythm as you begin playing guitar. Alternatively, if you don’t know how the song goes, you can also play the original song in the background as you play along with it.
It is also the reason why it is as important for him to employ people and give them a chance, as it is to create a great product that will be used by millions of guitar enthusiasts. Travis Perry states that he absolutely needs an investment from the Sharks, because he has been able to make his product known on the market, but he has ran out of money.
In their quest to innovate, I think JamPlay really took the camera angle thing overboard. Sometimes they show so many angles of hands on the screen, that it can get confusing and not intuitive at all. There is an camera angle which I really dislike, the "teacher angle", which is a camera above the teacher aiming at his fretting hand. Mixing angles of the same hand on a screen is not cool, I literally get dizzy watching it.
I would especially like to stress the gentle approach Justin takes with two key aspects that contributed to my development as a musician - music theory and ear training. Justin has succeeded in conveying the importance and profoundness of understanding music both theoretically and through your ears while maintaining a simple and accessible approach to them, all while sticking to what is ultimately the most important motto: 'If it sounds good, it is good'.
NOTE! We get asked all the time why a guitar educational company with so many advanced courses would offer such a simple solution to learning guitar without having to learn how to read music, learn theory or work through a more "formal" learning methodology. The answer is really simple; you never stop learning music but you do have to start. If your introduction to music is boring, tedious and generally a struggle, you'll likely pack the guitar up in its case and stick it in the closet. If it's fun, engaging and you can prove to yourself that you can really do it, then you'll spend a lifetime enjoying and learning guitar. Hopefully, TrueFire and our massive library of instruction will enhance that lifetime of enjoyment.
Tapping is a technique where the right hand taps a string and alternates with notes played by the left hand. A basic way you can start tapping is to find three notes that you want to play on one string and play them as triplets using this sequence: tap, pull-off, pull-off. The first note is tapped with your index or middle finger and then pulls-off onto a note held by one of the left hand fingers, which is then pulled-off onto another note held by a left hand finger. Other ways to tap are to use more right hand fingers, use open strings, and to use different rhythms.

Sound familiar? I know what that’s like… I’ve been there, and I’ve had several students that have been there. Playing the same licks, the same riffs, the same songs on your guitar over and over and over again just gets old so fast.  You’re willing to put in the work, you’re willing to practice hard, BUT WHAT SHOULD YOU PRACTICE?? HOW CAN I LEARN TO BE CREATIVE? IF ONLY I COULD PLAY THAT ONE SOLO!
After you are comfortable with the basics, you can move on to learn different styles: blues, country, rock. Each style is explained thoroughly, as well as the techniques that you would use to play each style of music. Another great feature we found was that since each style requires different gear, amp setings, and generally a different tone, Guitar Tricks walks you through getting the right tone for the given style as well.

Electric guitar: Well the world of electric guitars is in some ways more complex, as there are all kinds of different looks and technologies. And it’s not good enough to just have a guitar, you need to buy an amplifier as well. I will just recommend mid-level stuff that’s worked for me based on my preferences, but if you like “stuff” and collecting gear, you’ll find playing the guitar to be a deeply satisfying hobby :)
×