Do you want to start guitar lessons but you're wondering how long it will take you to see the payoff? Or, have you already started and you're wondering if you're really making progress? Guitar teacher Peter M. shares just how long it really takes most students to learn guitar... This age old question has been asked by nearly all of my students for as long as I’ve been teaching: how long will it take to learn how to play guitar? Will it take a week? A month? A year? Longer? And the answer i
NOTE! We get asked all the time why a guitar educational company with so many advanced courses would offer such a simple solution to learning guitar without having to learn how to read music, learn theory or work through a more "formal" learning methodology. The answer is really simple; you never stop learning music but you do have to start. If your introduction to music is boring, tedious and generally a struggle, you'll likely pack the guitar up in its case and stick it in the closet. If it's fun, engaging and you can prove to yourself that you can really do it, then you'll spend a lifetime enjoying and learning guitar. Hopefully, TrueFire and our massive library of instruction will enhance that lifetime of enjoyment.
Along with my massive website revamp in 2018, I am remaking and improving many of the modules in this course so don't be surprised if some bits look a little different :) I'm now dividing the 9 stages of the Beginner course into three grades; white (1), yellow (2) and orange (3). As well as the core lessons with practice routines and song suggestions, each grade will have some related lessons on Ear Training, Rhythm Study, Guitar Maintenance, Practical Music Theory to help you understand how music works!
Justin, first off I just wanted to say thanks for all the advice and instruction. You make playing guitar easy and understandable and fun. You explain very well the hows and whys when presenting a new song to learn and walk it through so that anyone can learn. I have played guitar for 20 years now and have learned more from you in the last five years than the previous 15 by myself. You have also been a tremendous help to both my son and my daughter in learning to play as well by making playing fun and interesting. I have a couple of pictures of me and my children all doing what we love. Many Thanks to you Justin
Hopefully, you've found, bought or borrowed a guitar pick. If not, you'll need to buy yourself some. Don't be stingy, go and pick up at least 10 of them — guitar picks are easy to lose (they often don't cost more than 30 or 40 cents each). You can experiment with different shapes and brands, but I highly recommend medium gauge picks to start; ones that aren't too flimsy, or too hard.
A large selection (140+) of songs is available at this stage under the heading 'Songs Made Easy'. These are popular songs simplified for the student to begin to practise and develop. Perfect – that's why most people play, right? We want to play the songs we love and build more songs in our repertoire. All the crucial details are included like of how to set your guitar and amp for the specific sound/effect you want.
You Don’t Have to Be a Shark is filled with personal anecdotes and life lessons you might have learned in business school (or at least you think you might have). By drawing from my own life experiences, I will teach you how to how to use pure sales techniques to be more successful in every aspect of your life. My philosophy is simple: great salespeople are made, not born, and no one achieves success in life without knowing how to sell. You Don’t Have to Be a Shark will teach you all that and more. Available now! Order your copy today.
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:
Travis Perry answers the question by saying that he was teaching his eight year old daughter how to play the guitar, but she was getting frustrated and wanted to quit. Travis Perry continues by stating that he had an idea for a magical device, which has buttons on it that would allow everyone to easily learn how to play the guitar, to which his daughter asked him to actually invent the device, because she really loved playing the guitar.
Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.
In other words, all of the guitar gods throughout music history played an instrument essentially like the one you own. It’s not like they have some kind of advantage, aside from their talent and experience. The same notes and chords they play are available on your guitar, and while it may take a lot of hard work on your part, you can play them too if you want to.

Private Guitar lessons with a certified TakeLessons teacher are customized to each and every student based on their current skill level, and goals. Beginner students get to practice basic songs, basic exercises, and basic techniques. From there, the difficulty increases in order to properly challenge and motivate intermediate and advanced level guitarists to develop greater skills, to break through their preconceived limitations, and to ultimately get more satisfaction, meaning, and even paid opportunities from the becoming a skilled guitarist.

Let's stick with three chord songs in our I-IV-V progressions, but we can now do the same songs in the key of A (A-D-E) and in the key of D (D-G-A). So, if a three chord song didn't sound quite right before in the key of A or wasn't great for your singing range, now try it in the key of D (use D instead of A, use G instead of D, and use A instead of E).
Justin is a phenomenal teacher and this book is great for anyone starting to learn guitar. The book goes perfectly with his Beginner's course but even on its own is a superb tool for beginners. It has a lot of famous songs arranged using simple chords (pitch-perfect renditions I should add). It's filled with useful tips and suggestion to improve your playing and make the sound more authentic even if you are a beginner. I don't think I have seen a better, more beginner friendly guitar songbook out there. I would highly recommend this to anybody learning guitar. It's a must-have if you are learning using Justin's videos.

Given that there are not too many one chord songs, this won't be the most rewarding moment of the course! However, that's okay because good things come to those who wait, and I won't make you wait too much longer! Nevertheless, if you can sing a melody while strumming the A chord, you'll start to hear the musicality of what you have already learned.


Unfortunately, before you begin playing, you'll really need to tune your guitar. The problem is, it is, at first, a relatively difficult task, one that becomes much easier over time. If you know of anyone who plays guitar, who could do the job for you, it is advised that you get them to tune your instrument. Alternately, you could invest in a "guitar tuner," a relatively inexpensive device which listens to the sound of each string and advises you (via a few blinking lights) on what you need to do in order to get the note in tune.
I'm just back from another awesome week residential workshop in Italy (this time near Forli) which was great fun but plagued by me and Dario (the other teacher) having really bad hey fever. There is one spot left on the next acoustic workshop in Tuscany and two spaces for the Blues Jam workshop in late June. See the JustinGuitar Workshop website if you're interested.
If you’re the type of parent who believes music can improve early childhood development, science has good news for you. A recent study suggests that guitar practice can help children better and faster process music and verbal language. Hearing different pitches and tones can help one better parse spoken words. So while every parent should remain careful not to forcefully involve their little ones in music, sports, and other interests, parents can still take a gentler approach that stimulates joy and curiosity, and plant a seed for lifelong learning.
Wow, cool video man, uber informative. It’s interesting to see the side by side like this. I haven’t quite decided which site I’m gonna go with, but I’m leaning more towards guitartricks right now. I used to play a bit when I was younger, so I’m basically restarting the guitar, and those quick to the point lessons from guitartricks come off as a nice way of relearning everything I had long forgotten. I also want to learn Beatles songs, and it looks like only gutartricks has those.
"During meet and greet session, Daniel taught me how to tune my guitar and get me started on the instrument. Prior to signing up with Daniel, I tried to learn from watching online videos and follow a book. I wasted a year by these unorthodox methods of learning. After meeting Daniel on Skype, he gave me the confidence and accurate guidelines on how to to do it right the first time. I am so looking forward to my future lessons with this awesome teacher. He is very methodical in his approach. 🎼"

One great aspect of this site happens to be the song section. The songs can be sorted by style, artist, instructor, difficulty, popularity, and of course genre. They have just about every genre you can imagine (see picture below), common ones like rockabilly, rock, pop and obscure genres like world music and classical. Unlike on Youtube, here you'll find only accurate guitar tabs and high-quality demonstration.
Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)
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