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The filming of the videos is probably the biggest giveaway that this is a free site, as there is no pristine studio, crystal clear audio, or simultaneous multiple camera angles – just Justin sitting wherever he is that day, playing his guitar, and showing you what to do. It’s certainly not bad, but obviously lacks the polish of the paid-for tutorial sites.
Learning the notes on your guitar fretboard is one of the most important things you can do to advance your guitar playing skills. Knowing this information opens up an enormous amount of possibilities and can greatly help ease the learning curve for future guitar exercises. From scales, to soloing, to chord positions / progressions, knowing where each guitar note without having to think about it will put you well ahead of other guitarists who have not mastered this yet. This guide will give you some background information regarding how the notes on your guitar fretboard are laid out and of

First: I am now 73 years on this earth. Last February I decided to try learning some about guitar playing. For me it was like one of those things i'd thought about a lot but never made the time to pursue. Then I thought I might be to old to add new talent to this body. After reading and viewing a lot of information on line and contact with a local teaching facility I decided to give Guitartricks a try. I am a DIY person and if given good instruction am able to learn quickly. I found the instruction at Guitartricks to be very clear and concise so I was able to quickly put the instructions into practice. I started with Lisa McCormick who made me familiar with the basics and led me clearly to achieve my goals of being able to entertain family and myself. I have Arthritis in my hands so some of the four finger and Bar cords are just out of reach for me. That has not stopped me from learning the basic cords and having a whale of a time playing with those. Surprised me at just how many songs you can keep up with using only a few cords! Guitartricks offers a whole lot for your money and always offers extra help if you have a need for some. They offer one on one, and group sessions if you are inclined. The instructors are great people who care about you being able to achieve your personal goals with guitar. I owe special thanks to Lisa McCormick, Caren Armstrong, and Anders Mouridsen. If you want to learn guitar, and are willing to apply the time needed for practice, Guitartricks is the place. Take it from this old kid you're never to old to learn some new tricks. Thank You,
Practice playing individual notes. Holding down a string and producing a decent sound can sometimes be more challenging than it looks. If you don't hold down a string hard enough, you'll get a muted note and if you hold down the string too close to the fret your guitar will buzz. Practice picking in an up and down motion on your string with the other hand. Continue doing this until you feel comfortable moving up or down the neck to a different note. Practice playing the notes back and forth until you become comfortable strumming.
One great aspect of this site happens to be the song section. The songs can be sorted by style, artist, instructor, difficulty, popularity, and of course genre. They have just about every genre you can imagine (see picture below), common ones like rockabilly, rock, pop and obscure genres like world music and classical. Unlike on Youtube, here you'll find only accurate guitar tabs and high-quality demonstration.

You may have trouble finding a guitar teacher who is on the same wavelength you are on. In other posts I’ve recounted my first experiences with a guitar instructor back when I first started playing. The guy did not seem to care one whit about what kind of music I was into or what my goals were as a new musician. He was going to teach me songs he wanted me to learn, not help me explore music that inspired me. Or perhaps he just thought a kid wearing an Ozzy Osbourne t-shirt would also be into Lionel Richie.

My original thesis behind my site was (and still is), that I want to create lessons that will make people fall in love with the guitar, and get them motivated to play real songs. I think I’m good at creating high quality lessons that beginners will enjoy and draw enthusiasm from, but the thing is that I am a one man show at TheGuitarLesson.com, and there are only so many lessons I can produce, while Jamplay and Guitartricks are “big” companies, pumping out new content non-stop.


So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and

By now, you’ve already decided whether to stick with the Guitar or to drop it. If you’re one of the lucky few that stuck with it, in spite of having an extremely busy schedule with work and family obligations, congratulations. Contrary to popular belief, taking the time out for routine Guitar practice has tremendous benefits, even for the busiest of people.

Tony started playing guitar at the age of 14. At age 18 he relocated to Minneapolis, Minnesota to attend Music Tech of Minneapolis. Through the years he has played throughout the upper midwest and most currently in the Ark-La-Tex area, With his band, SUPERUNKNOWN. Tony teaches all styles of Rock, Metal, Blues, Progressive, Latin Rock and Classical.
Now, pick up your guitar, and hold it so the back of the body of the instrument comes in contact with your stomach/chest, and the bottom of the neck runs parallel to the floor. The thickest string on the guitar should be the closest to your face, while the thinnest should be closest to the floor. If this isn't the case, turn the guitar the in other direction. Typically, a right-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the left, whereas a left-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the right.
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Learn the difference between chords and single notes. Chords occur when you play two or more notes on different strings simultaneously to create one unified sound. These are what make up the "rhythm" portion of acoustic music. Single notes are used more for solos and occur when you play a single note at a time. Both are skills that you must become proficient in when learning to play the acoustic guitar.[4]
Then, play the notes again on the first string, but in reverse order: fourth fret to open string. Then go back to the second string, back to third and all the way back to the sixth string where you started, playing the notes in reverse each time. When you’ve completed the cycle you will have played each note on the first through fourth frets on each string and back again.
By the end of these 12 lessons, you’ll know how to hold the guitar, identify the parts of the acoustic and electric guitar, tune the guitar, play four important guitar chords, strum the guitar, and even combine all these things to play your very first song. Getting into playing music right away is going to be great motivation to get you going. Once you've completed these lessons you’ll have a solid foundation for your future guitar playing and you’ll have a good idea of what you should work on next.

This course is completely free, but please consider making a donation or buying some my products in the official store if you dig it - your support enables me to keep expanding and improving the courses for everyone! My Practical Music Theory Course is also great for those that really want to understand what they're doing - the early grades are free to check out too!

Do you want to start guitar lessons but you're wondering how long it will take you to see the payoff? Or, have you already started and you're wondering if you're really making progress? Guitar teacher Peter M. shares just how long it really takes most students to learn guitar... This age old question has been asked by nearly all of my students for as long as I’ve been teaching: how long will it take to learn how to play guitar? Will it take a week? A month? A year? Longer? And the answer i … Read More


Now, pick up your guitar, and hold it so the back of the body of the instrument comes in contact with your stomach/chest, and the bottom of the neck runs parallel to the floor. The thickest string on the guitar should be the closest to your face, while the thinnest should be closest to the floor. If this isn't the case, turn the guitar the in other direction. Typically, a right-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the left, whereas a left-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the right.

You can turn on a backing track and play along with whatever your creativity wants that day. If do not always have access to a band, having the jam station works just like having your own band! They even have the sheet music below each jam which is very helpful. The jam station is great to use if you are a creative musician looking for some inspiration.
I have to admit – I’ve always wanted to be a rock star ! When Travis entered the tank I knew Chordbuddy might be the only way for me to achieve my dream. Years later we know who the real rock star of this story is – Travis. I did this deal because I could see the passion he had for teaching guitar. He truly wants to share music with the the world and developed a foolproof system for learning one of the most common instruments. More than that – I loved that he invented ChordBuddy so his daughter would share his love for music – true dedication to his craft and his family! Four years after making the deal, there is no shortage of ChordBuddy success stories and I know that this simple and innovative product is the only guitar learning system you’ll ever need to be a rock star like Travis.
Now this of course does not mean that we won’t do songs, as playing your favorite songs is a very fun and good part of playing guitar. What this means is that instead of falling into the trap of just learning one song, then another, then another and never actually learning how things work, we will be sure to show you HOW SONGS WORK so that when you learn or play a song you can learn it by understanding the core idea of the song instead of trying to memorize the several hundred individual notes that are inside of the song.  Basically, we will make sure you understand how music works so that you are free to have fun not just learning and memorizing songs, but also by playing on the fly or writing your own songs!

So, don't get too caught up in strums, as the best approach is to start any new song with this basic down strum. Then, hit the strings on the way up as well, the down-up strum while counting "1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and." This way you are making twice the amount of sound with the same hand motion, giving you a little more movement and fuller accompaniment to a vocal line (melody).
I've started off a new series with the awesome Ariel Posen, The Captains Privates series is popular as ever and I've also been filling in some beginner lessons of things I get asked about all the time... I'm about to re-kindle the Blues Lead 3 series which fell off the wagon somewhere and also get the gear videos rocking again... so lots in the works, lots going on and still loving it!
For many people who pick up the guitar for the first time, learning scales is often not at the top of their priority list. This is normal and as a beginner guitarist, there is other more important foundation knowledge that should first be acquired. However, at the point when you start learning scales as a guitarist is when you know you’re starting to get serious about playing. Learning guitar scales is a fantastic way to practice your technique and theory. Scales also come in handy for a variety of purposes such as: Writing music Improvising/jamming with others Understanding how music
I would especially like to stress the gentle approach Justin takes with two key aspects that contributed to my development as a musician - music theory and ear training. Justin has succeeded in conveying the importance and profoundness of understanding music both theoretically and through your ears while maintaining a simple and accessible approach to them, all while sticking to what is ultimately the most important motto: 'If it sounds good, it is good'.
You can turn on a backing track and play along with whatever your creativity wants that day. If do not always have access to a band, having the jam station works just like having your own band! They even have the sheet music below each jam which is very helpful. The jam station is great to use if you are a creative musician looking for some inspiration.
Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.
First: I am now 73 years on this earth. Last February I decided to try learning some about guitar playing. For me it was like one of those things i'd thought about a lot but never made the time to pursue. Then I thought I might be to old to add new talent to this body. After reading and viewing a lot of information on line and contact with a local teaching facility I decided to give Guitartricks a try. I am a DIY person and if given good instruction am able to learn quickly. I found the instruction at Guitartricks to be very clear and concise so I was able to quickly put the instructions into practice. I started with Lisa McCormick who made me familiar with the basics and led me clearly to achieve my goals of being able to entertain family and myself. I have Arthritis in my hands so some of the four finger and Bar cords are just out of reach for me. That has not stopped me from learning the basic cords and having a whale of a time playing with those. Surprised me at just how many songs you can keep up with using only a few cords! Guitartricks offers a whole lot for your money and always offers extra help if you have a need for some. They offer one on one, and group sessions if you are inclined. The instructors are great people who care about you being able to achieve your personal goals with guitar. I owe special thanks to Lisa McCormick, Caren Armstrong, and Anders Mouridsen. If you want to learn guitar, and are willing to apply the time needed for practice, Guitartricks is the place. Take it from this old kid you're never to old to learn some new tricks. Thank You,

Determine the guitar riff that you want to learn. Listen to acoustic guitar songs that you enjoy and choose one that you'd like to learn. When finding your first song, try to find a song that has an easy chord progression. Listen to the song and determine how many chord changes it has and the speed in which the song is played. If there aren't that many chords or the song seems simple to play, you should choose that song as your first song to learn.
In 2007 he started Chocolate Cake Productions with friend Jed Wardley to release his instructional DVDs. By June 2012 there are 11 DVDs available, including "Master The Major Scale", "Really Useful Strumming Techniques", a "Solo Blues Guitar" series, "The JustinGuitar Beginner's Course" and "Intermediate Method". Sandercoe also publishes a number of electronic books in .pdf format, including "Practical Music Theory", "The Chord Construction Guide" and "Understanding Rhythm Notation", as well as an ongoing series of instructional songbooks, to which entries include the Vintage Songbook, the Rock Songbook, the Pop Songbook, and the Acoustic Songbook.
There really isn't a best age for kids to start guitar lessons, but most children under the age of 7 generally don't have the dexterity or patience needed to learn to play the guitar. With persistence and motivation some kids have learned to play guitar at some impressively young ages, but it really comes down to is the individual attitude and maturity level of the student. 

There’s plenty of people with small hands who play the guitar. Nine times out of ten smaller people confuse the terrible awkwardness that comes with the first week of playing the guitar and mistakenly think it’s because their hands are small. Again, you’re teaching your hands to do really strange movements here. Imagine going to an advanced yoga class having never stretched before, that’s basically what you’re doing.
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