Steve Vai on justinguitar.com! Steve Vai (www.vai.com) "I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself."
In their quest to innovate, I think JamPlay really took the camera angle thing overboard. Sometimes they show so many angles of hands on the screen, that it can get confusing and not intuitive at all. There is an camera angle which I really dislike, the "teacher angle", which is a camera above the teacher aiming at his fretting hand. Mixing angles of the same hand on a screen is not cool, I literally get dizzy watching it.
In conclusion of our review of GuitarTricks.com, we can say that GuitarTricks is a huge video guitar lesson database, which is suitable for all player skill levels. Because of the wide variety of material available in the website, it might be tempting to skip around, which could cause you to miss some necessary skill lessons. Guitar Tricks is a incredibly affordable online video guitar lessons site with many helpful tools that are of true benefit to guitar students, therefore it comes with our highest recommendations.
So you've started taking guitar lessons and you've learned how to play some of the essential chords. When you grip your guitar, you probably feel instantly cooler, and trust me, you should. While being able to play some sweet riffs on your ax will definitely make you the life of the party and boost your street cred, those aren't the only perks of your new hobby. Here are five benefits of playing guitar. 1. Strum Away the Stress No matter what's causing you to feel stressed, spend some time
Travis Perry states that he loves playing music, and that he has taught thousands of people how to play the guitar. He states that it is sad to see thousands of people quit playing the guitar, simply because it is very difficult to master it. According to Travis Perry, the guitar is the most popular instrument in the world, but it is also one of the most frustrating.

Along with my massive website revamp in 2018, I am remaking and improving many of the modules in this course so don't be surprised if some bits look a little different :) I'm now dividing the 9 stages of the Beginner course into three grades; white (1), yellow (2) and orange (3). As well as the core lessons with practice routines and song suggestions, each grade will have some related lessons on Ear Training, Rhythm Study, Guitar Maintenance, Practical Music Theory to help you understand how music works!
It’s a shame this app with excellent content is almost unusable. The app’s buttons (back button etc) when in a lesson frequently become unresponsive . The video control buttons disappear randomly. And there is no way to play the videos in landscape mode, which is basic stuff! I am using iPhone 6 with latest iOS. All in all the app quality does grave injustice to the awesome content. At the minimum, the unresponsive buttons, disappearing video controls (pause, forward/rewind, no skip back 10 seconds!) and lack of landscape mode video must be fixed on priority. Eventually the app must rewritten by some quality/experienced app developers and experts in mobile app user interface/experience . The great content in the app deserves better software for presenting it! Had it not been for the awesome content, I would have given it 1 star.
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:
On the GuitarTricks forum, you risk to get lost reading threads for hours, and forget to take some lessons! They have both open community discussions and subscriber only sections, that way you will not feel left out before getting a paid membership. In conclusion, Guitar Tricks has tons of lessons and learning material and it has hours of fun when your guitar practice is over!
Wow, cool video man, uber informative. It’s interesting to see the side by side like this. I haven’t quite decided which site I’m gonna go with, but I’m leaning more towards guitartricks right now. I used to play a bit when I was younger, so I’m basically restarting the guitar, and those quick to the point lessons from guitartricks come off as a nice way of relearning everything I had long forgotten. I also want to learn Beatles songs, and it looks like only gutartricks has those.

Then, play the notes again on the first string, but in reverse order: fourth fret to open string. Then go back to the second string, back to third and all the way back to the sixth string where you started, playing the notes in reverse each time. When you’ve completed the cycle you will have played each note on the first through fourth frets on each string and back again.
The chord name is given above the words of the lyrics and on the corresponding page Justin gives his recommended strumming pattern as well as some tips and trivia. There are other chord strum-a-long books out there but most of them usually just give the chords and the lyrics and not much else. You definitely get a bit more with this book. That being said, if you are familiar with Justin's videos, there really isn't anything new in the book from what he says/does in his videos. So if you are looking for something new, you may be disappointed. I purchased this mainly because I am a visual learner and seeing strumming patterns and lyrics right in front of me makes learning a lot easier (as opposed to watching Justin's videos over and over again). If you have surpassed the beginner level in Justin's guitar course, I'd recommend skipping this.
It’s important to realize there is a fine line between challenging yourself with music that is slightly above your ability, and frustrating yourself with music you have no logical reason to expect yourself to be able to play just yet. This line is different for each new guitarist. Some may work on basic chords for years, and be happy enough with that. Others may dive neck-deep into some fairy difficult music and thrive on the challenge it provides. Point is, go at your own pace, and don’t ever feel like you need to take on more of a challenge than you are ready for.
Instead of spoon feeding you information in a way that you are eternally dependent on your lessons as many do, we want to help you become an independent learner so that you not only continue learning guitar and growing your skills for the rest of your life.. but that you also develop into your own type of guitar player with your own sound and playing style.  The way that we structure each student’s curriculum purposefully helps to encourage perpetual growth and learning so that you will continually become the most awesome musician that you can be, even when you aren’t at your lessons!
Secondly, you are going to build up a vocabulary of basic chords. This should include mastering open-form A, C, D, E, F and G Major chords, as well as open-form minors such as Am, Em, Dm and even some easy 7th chords. You should learn to play “power chords” (which actually aren’t chords at all) as well as the most commonly used movable barre shapes such as A, Am, E and Em.

Now, check to see how you did. While still holding down the chord with your fretting hand, play each string (starting with the sixth) one at a time, listening to be sure each note rings out clearly. If not, study your hand to determine why it doesn't. Are you pressing hard enough? Is one of your other fingers touching that string, which is preventing it from sounding properly? These are the most common reasons why a note does not sound. If you're having trouble, read this feature on getting your chords to ring clearly.


After teaching guitar and music theory to thousands of students over past three decades, I thought that I had basically 'seen it all' when it comes to guitar instruction. Then I discovered Justin’s website, and man was I impressed! Justin’s caring spirit, attention to detail, vast knowledge base, and especially his lucid, laidback and nurturing style, allow students to fall in love with the learning process. You see, it’s not enough to simply find out how to play a few cool licks or chords. A truly great teacher will make you fall in love with the process of discovery so that you can unlock the best within you. Justin is one of these great teachers, and I highly recommend justinguitar.com to anyone who wants to tap into their best selves.

My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.

When people learn to play a band instrument or the piano, there are almost always professional instructors involved. However, when it comes to the guitar, many of the people who learn to play the guitar learn to play by ear, which is essentially amounts to playing their favorite songs over and over again until they get it right (or at least close). 

When people learn to play a band instrument or the piano, there are almost always professional instructors involved. However, when it comes to the guitar, many of the people who learn to play the guitar learn to play by ear, which is essentially amounts to playing their favorite songs over and over again until they get it right (or at least close).
After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.
Guitar Compass features hundreds of free guitar lesson videos. These online lessons are designed to teach you how to play guitar by covering the absolute basics up to more advanced soloing concepts and techniques. The lessons span different difficultly levels and genres like blues, rock, country, and jazz. Each lesson is designed to introduce you to a subject and get to know our instructors and their teaching style. To access more lessons and in-depth instruction, try a free 7 day trial of our premium membership.
There’s only one thing I would comment on, and that is GF1 and 2 is lead by the same person, and the only songs you’re going to be playing are what I’d term as country love songs. If you’re ok with that, then you’re all set. If (like me) this sort of music grates on you, you’re going to find 1&2 very hard, and like me you’ll need to find some other way of practicing the lessons.
Success! You’ve decided to make your living doing something you love! You’ve learned so much and come so far, but there are so many styles and variations that you could likely go on finding new and different ways to play guitar forever. Taking the time for a lesson every so often can refresh your playing immensely. New skills lead to new and better songwriting, and more impressive performances, so try to meet with an instructor every month or two.
Consider two new guitar players who start out on the exact same day with the exact same learning method. Fast-forward to one year later, and the first guitar player has spent a thousand hours playing guitar during that year, while the second has only spent a hundred hours with the instrument. It isn’t hard to guess which player will be more advanced after only one year of playing. So, which guitar player would you rather be?
So anyhow, both GuitarTricks and JamPlay are great sites, it all comes down to you, the student. If you are diligent and dedicate enough time and practice to it, you’ll succeed either way. The reason I recommend GuitarTricks to beginners is because it gives them one less chance to sidestep and wonder around looking at other teacher’s lessons when things get a bit harder. That’s what a lot of people do on my site.
Throughout the Beginner Guitar Quick-Start Series, we’ll include the most important things you need to know be successful at playing guitar right away. First we’ll cover basics like how to tune your guitar, how to hold your guitar, and the parts of the guitar. After that, we’ll get into technique, how to strum, how to make your first chords, and how to play your first song.
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
Determine the guitar riff that you want to learn. Listen to acoustic guitar songs that you enjoy and choose one that you'd like to learn. When finding your first song, try to find a song that has an easy chord progression. Listen to the song and determine how many chord changes it has and the speed in which the song is played. If there aren't that many chords or the song seems simple to play, you should choose that song as your first song to learn.
Your success on guitar, or anything in life, is directly related to the effort you give. Is it true that some people are more gifted than others when it comes to music? Of course, but don’t go around thinking you can't learn guitar because you weren’t born with the right musical aptitude. That's nonsense. Some people may be more gifted, and you can't control that. What you can do is control how hard you work, and promise yourself that nobody will ever outwork you.
It’s actually very easy: Play an open sixth string note, followed by the first fret of the sixth string with your first (pointer) finger. Then play the second fret on the same string with your second finger. Then the third with your third (ring) finger, and finally you play the fourth fret on the sixth string with your fourth (pinky) finger. Incidentally, this movement up the neck of one fret a time (or half-step) is called the Chromatic Scale, which is where this exercise gets its name.
Let’s be honest, private lessons aren’t the best idea for college students who are generally tight on budget, time, and commitments. However, that doesn’t mean you should stop learning and practicing. You can still work on the guitar by taking classes or participating in music programs at your college. These tend to be more affordable, more social, and less stressful than trying to fit private lessons into your routine.
I initially bought a few books just to contribute to Justins generous cause, but didn't really think they would be needed as all this is online after all right?... but no, they have actually really helped further my skills along much faster. Just having the song book available when you get the time to play helps a lot (get the ring bound one if you can)
3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
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