* Detune dive bomb - A.K.A. Poor man's dive bomb. On guitars with non locking string nuts, you can simulate a dive bomb by turning the tuning key of the low E string down while the note is ringing. This trick is great when used on hard tail bridge guitars with no floating tremolos. You'll have to know how to tune a guitar by ear if you intend to use this trick frequently.


"Working with Chris Pinon is an absolute pleasure. First, he is a professional! He knows his stuff, and is enthusiastic to share his knowledge in a way that will speak to his students. He is approachable, funny, and flexible. He works with his students to help them achieve their goals. After many years of taking different guitar classes and guitar lessons with a variety of teachers, Chris has been my best teacher to date! I really enjoy the online component, because he is able to express his knowledge, hone technique, and share documents instantaneously. His multiple camera setup allows for close-ups of chord shapes, a face shot so you feel like you're in the room with him, and sheet music display. Chris is organized, linear, and present, both online and in person. Online lessons with him have opened up a world of possibility for my guitar and ukulele playing! The website is easy to navigate and payment goes without a hitch. I feel very lucky to be a student of Chris Pinon's."

There’s only one thing I would comment on, and that is GF1 and 2 is lead by the same person, and the only songs you’re going to be playing are what I’d term as country love songs. If you’re ok with that, then you’re all set. If (like me) this sort of music grates on you, you’re going to find 1&2 very hard, and like me you’ll need to find some other way of practicing the lessons.
The chord name is given above the words of the lyrics and on the corresponding page Justin gives his recommended strumming pattern as well as some tips and trivia. There are other chord strum-a-long books out there but most of them usually just give the chords and the lyrics and not much else. You definitely get a bit more with this book. That being said, if you are familiar with Justin's videos, there really isn't anything new in the book from what he says/does in his videos. So if you are looking for something new, you may be disappointed. I purchased this mainly because I am a visual learner and seeing strumming patterns and lyrics right in front of me makes learning a lot easier (as opposed to watching Justin's videos over and over again). If you have surpassed the beginner level in Justin's guitar course, I'd recommend skipping this.

So anyhow, both GuitarTricks and JamPlay are great sites, it all comes down to you, the student. If you are diligent and dedicate enough time and practice to it, you’ll succeed either way. The reason I recommend GuitarTricks to beginners is because it gives them one less chance to sidestep and wonder around looking at other teacher’s lessons when things get a bit harder. That’s what a lot of people do on my site.


It’s actually very easy: Play an open sixth string note, followed by the first fret of the sixth string with your first (pointer) finger. Then play the second fret on the same string with your second finger. Then the third with your third (ring) finger, and finally you play the fourth fret on the sixth string with your fourth (pinky) finger. Incidentally, this movement up the neck of one fret a time (or half-step) is called the Chromatic Scale, which is where this exercise gets its name.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that students learn faster when taking private guitar lessons or classes, compared to watching video tutorials or YouTube videos. Finding a specialized teacher - whether in-home, studio, or online classes - for one-on-one guitar tutoring will give you the feedback and personal attention you need to become the best guitar player you can be!
I bet that you’ve even tried other methods to figure it out. Spending hours on YouTube and google searching for some guitar method that will get you to the level you want, just to get bogged down in the TRUCKLOADS of seemingly unrelated material… Getting some friends that play guitar to show you something here and there, learning some songs off of tabs that are sometimes right and sometimes terribly, terribly wrong just to find that you’re stuck playing the same old things without knowing what to do next.
PS If you’ve read this far, then you probably are at least thinking about taking the next step.  Stop thinking about it and doubting in yourself, you want this, so take the action necessary to achieve your goals and  continue towards becoming an amazing rock guitar player right now! You won’t regret at least giving it a try, but you probably will regret it if you don’t.
In the world of piano, if a student is learning a piece of music, there can be several different technical variations so that the student can play the music they want without overwhelming themselves with something that is much too difficult. While some of this exists for modern guitar, it tends to be quite limited unless a student is studying classical guitar.

The teen and tween years are the make or break years for most people, in deciding whether they’re going to stick with a childhood hobby or interest, for life. As you go through puberty, and begin preparing for life as an adult, and responsibilities pile on your plate, the first things to go tend to be the personal interests you’re passionate about, because they don’t pay the bills. Also, because they’re not an official part of your school curriculum. In other words, what was once a must-have becomes a nice-to-have.
Realistically, to start improving on guitar, you're going to need to set aside a bit of time to practice. Developing a daily routine is a good idea. Plan to spend at least 15 minutes daily practicing all you've learned will really help. At first, your fingers will be sore, but by playing daily, they'll toughen up, and in a short amount of time, they'll stop hurting. The following list should give you an idea of how to spend your practice time:
In conclusion of our review of GuitarTricks.com, we can say that GuitarTricks is a huge video guitar lesson database, which is suitable for all player skill levels. Because of the wide variety of material available in the website, it might be tempting to skip around, which could cause you to miss some necessary skill lessons. Guitar Tricks is a incredibly affordable online video guitar lessons site with many helpful tools that are of true benefit to guitar students, therefore it comes with our highest recommendations.
This class is perfect for beginners who are ready to build their guitar repertoire. You’ll learn the major scale, both vertically and horizontally, as well as open position scales. Barre chords and basic chords in open position will give you a great starting point for the rest of your guitar journey. Once you get down these essentials you’ll be ready to take on any new challenges!

I've started off a new series with the awesome Ariel Posen, The Captains Privates series is popular as ever and I've also been filling in some beginner lessons of things I get asked about all the time... I'm about to re-kindle the Blues Lead 3 series which fell off the wagon somewhere and also get the gear videos rocking again... so lots in the works, lots going on and still loving it!


These reviews are repasted everywhere and a primary difference always given between GuitarTricks and JamPlay is the price. This being the case, it is worth noting that JamPlay also has a yearly subscription offer which lowers the price substantially. The reviewer noted that the annual membership brings the monthly fee down to $10.75. I don’t believe it was mentioned in the JamPlay review (at least not when I read it) that the annual fee there brings the monthly fee down to about $11.66. Additionally, it is relatively easy to find a 10% of coupon code for any membership at JamPlay which brings the monthly fee down around $10.50!
I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself.
Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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