Let’s be honest, private lessons aren’t the best idea for college students who are generally tight on budget, time, and commitments. However, that doesn’t mean you should stop learning and practicing. You can still work on the guitar by taking classes or participating in music programs at your college. These tend to be more affordable, more social, and less stressful than trying to fit private lessons into your routine.
For the most part, all great guitar players need to have the same tools of technique and knowledge at their disposal, however, guitar players of different styles will use these tools in very different ways. So if you’re goal is to be able to write your own songs, we’ll show you how the things that you’re learning can be used in songwriting, or if you’re more of a guitar solo person, we’ll show you how to use everything to melt people’s faces with amazing guitar solos.  It isn’t enough for you to just learn things, so we will make sure that you can see how everything that you learn is going to help you with your specific goals!
Through School of Rock's private guitar lessons and group rehearsals, children learn to play the guitar and eventually perform the songs they love in a fun, supportive and comfortable atmosphere. Based on the student's age and skill level, guitar lessons for kids are part of every School of Rock music program including Rookies, Rock 101, Performance, House Band, and AllStars.
PS If you’ve read this far, then you probably are at least thinking about taking the next step.  Stop thinking about it and doubting in yourself, you want this, so take the action necessary to achieve your goals and  continue towards becoming an amazing rock guitar player right now! You won’t regret at least giving it a try, but you probably will regret it if you don’t.
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This class is perfect for beginners who are ready to build their guitar repertoire. You’ll learn the major scale, both vertically and horizontally, as well as open position scales. Barre chords and basic chords in open position will give you a great starting point for the rest of your guitar journey. Once you get down these essentials you’ll be ready to take on any new challenges!
Of course any great site for online guitar lessons is going to have a great toolbox at your disposal. GuitarTricks has a tuner, chord finder, scale finder, metronome, a fretboard trainer, and best of all a jam station. This provides numerous jams and backing tracks in a variety of styles, keys, and genres. This is one of my favorite tools, as a songwriter this is not only how I build my playing skills, but how I get new ideas for songs I write.
This is a HUGE one. Many people that learn to play guitar are fine when they are playing by themselves, but when it’s time to play with others or in front of friends and family…what happens? They freeze up!  This is largely due to not being shown how to be confident with their playing and not having a system of learning in place that will push them and grow them to be able to play music with others and show off what they can do.  Not being able to play with others or in front of people is one of the worst feelings ever, so don’t let this be you!
Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[8]
NOTE! We get asked all the time why a guitar educational company with so many advanced courses would offer such a simple solution to learning guitar without having to learn how to read music, learn theory or work through a more "formal" learning methodology. The answer is really simple; you never stop learning music but you do have to start. If your introduction to music is boring, tedious and generally a struggle, you'll likely pack the guitar up in its case and stick it in the closet. If it's fun, engaging and you can prove to yourself that you can really do it, then you'll spend a lifetime enjoying and learning guitar. Hopefully, TrueFire and our massive library of instruction will enhance that lifetime of enjoyment.
What is particularly beneficial about this system is that you do not have to follow a particular structure of lessons. You can choose to learn whatever you want, whenever you want. All lessons can be viewed on your iPhone or iPad, as well as your computer so you can learn and practice wherever you happen to be. This makes it ideal for people who travel, students, as well as those who just want to practice in the privacy of their bedroom.
other subjects are just really introduced but not deeply covered : example for picking techniques, alternate tuning, etc. There is a lesson about circle of fifths for example and it was just not well explained, I sometimes struggle with chris schelegel videos, as he talks super fast and over complicates stuff, so I ended browsing he internet to try understanding some of the stuff he talked about, and then I found much more information on websites and way better explained…
The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.

In this post, I’m going to be doing a complete Chordbuddy review. If you don’t know what Chordbuddy is, it’s essentially a beginner’s learning system that allows guitar players to press down a single button to produce a guitar chord instead of playing the chord with your fingers directly on the strings. Now at first, you might be thinking what’s the point of that? If my fingers aren’t making the actual chord shapes how will I ever learn to play additional chords let alone the ones you can play with Chordbuddy?

For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.
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