I tried several times over the course of 20 years to learn guitar. I purchased guitars, amps, books, private lessons. Nothing ever stuck, until I found justinguitar.com. The only reason I can play guitar today is because of Justin. His courses are well thought out, easy to understand, easy to follow, and easy to make progress on. I can't think of a single product or service that I've ever used in my life that I could recommend more highly than justinguitar.com.
Your success on guitar, or anything in life, is directly related to the effort you give. Is it true that some people are more gifted than others when it comes to music? Of course, but don’t go around thinking you can't learn guitar because you weren’t born with the right musical aptitude. That's nonsense. Some people may be more gifted, and you can't control that. What you can do is control how hard you work, and promise yourself that nobody will ever outwork you.

If you’re the type of parent who believes music can improve early childhood development, science has good news for you. A recent study suggests that guitar practice can help children better and faster process music and verbal language. Hearing different pitches and tones can help one better parse spoken words. So while every parent should remain careful not to forcefully involve their little ones in music, sports, and other interests, parents can still take a gentler approach that stimulates joy and curiosity, and plant a seed for lifelong learning.
"He laid out the lesson very well and I felt as an absolute beginner that was just getting into it, that I learned a lot just in that 45 minutes. He gave detailed notes that I could easily follow while practicing and made sure to explain everything and answer all my questions. He was punctual on time, which I appreciated, and even when he thought he might be running a little late, he texted me to let me know that he might be. Considering his background and the variety of music that he has in his repertoire I really appreciate the style and professionalism that he's going to bring to our lessons. I sought him out specifically over everyone else because of this very fact as that speaks to me, as someone with a music background, of someone that is flexible and willing to not only teach but still learn themselves. I find that invaluable in a teacher and appreciate that."
Am Strut Solo 1 is a free guitar lesson that will teach you how to play a blues solo over our original Am Strut jam track. Peter Vogl will show you how to use the Am pentatonic scale in the open position, the A natural minor scale, and some outside notes to create a solo. We’ll use hammer-ons, slides, and our right hand to create a more expressive solo. Specifically, we’ll use the thumb instead of a pick to play the strings and add a plucky and funky vibe. Peter will start by walking you through the theory choices and how to play the solo in detail. Next, we’ll practice the whole solo at a reduced speed with a metronome before advancing to playing along with the track. Sign up for a free 7 day trial and access a PDF of the tabs, a downloadable mp3 jam track, and three more solos over this progression.
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.
I have looked at both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks. I found Jamplay to be some what impressive but hard to navigate,cluttered with useless “gadgets” and the instruction rather robotic from some instructors, on the other hand Guitar Tricks was warm,inviting,easy to navigate,the instruction was short sweet and to the point with tab and notes to accompany each lesson.This is such a structured site which can easily bring a beginner to an advanced/professional level provided you do your share and follow the suggestions on this site.I have found everything I will ever need to become the guitarist I’ve always dreamed of,oh by the way the cost is a steal compared to private lessons for one teacher,did I mention I have 45 teachers?
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The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
Secondly, you are going to build up a vocabulary of basic chords. This should include mastering open-form A, C, D, E, F and G Major chords, as well as open-form minors such as Am, Em, Dm and even some easy 7th chords. You should learn to play “power chords” (which actually aren’t chords at all) as well as the most commonly used movable barre shapes such as A, Am, E and Em.
One other cool thing about electric guitars– you can plug them into your computer and use a program like Apple’s Garageband as an amplifier. You can basically have 100’s of classic sounds available virtually. You can “jam” virtually with your computer and create full-on recordings on your laptop. You’ll just need a “pre-amp,” which is a device that amplifies the signal from your guitar before it sends it to your computer. I’d recommend something like the Focusrite Scarlett
Beginner to advanced, acoustic to electric, blues to country... we have the guitar lessons you need to move your playing forward. We consistently film, edit and publish around 11 hours of new guitar lessons every 30 days; an enormous amount of material to keep your playing focused and interests piqued. With new lessons added on a daily basis, you cannot find another company as dedicated to teaching you how to play guitar as JamPlay.
Realistically, to start improving on guitar, you're going to need to set aside a bit of time to practice. Developing a daily routine is a good idea. Plan to spend at least 15 minutes daily practicing all you've learned will really help. At first, your fingers will be sore, but by playing daily, they'll toughen up, and in a short amount of time, they'll stop hurting. The following list should give you an idea of how to spend your practice time:

Wow! This post really seems to have helped a lot of folks get started with the guitar. It has been read by – I kid you not – millions of aspiring guitarists. Thank you! As many of you have noted in the comments below, no, I’m not selling anything here related to playing the guitar. My motivation to write this post was that musicians, and especially guitar teachers, can often make learning the guitar sound way too hard. It’s actually easy.
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