All courses are available as instant downloads, on disc, or as streaming video on our website and mobile apps for iOS and Android. Study anywhere, anytime in the format of your choice. Interactive features and functions include standard notation, Power Tab, Guitar Pro, jam tracks, playback controls, video looping, slow-mo, tuner, metronome and other learning tools.
Some young players get the idea that you have to first master basic chords and scales before you can move on to playing songs you know by bands you love. Not so. Of course if you are into classical music, progressive metal or jazz that may be true, but you might be surprised to know that much of the rock and country music you hear is based around very simple chord progressions.
This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
The songs are arranged from easy beginners chords and layer up as you go thought the book. but they really work best with the website where Justin plays and teaches you how to play them then adds a few tricks and skills to advance each song too, so try watch all the songs even if you're not too interested in the song because there are gems of wisdom in them all. (I drew the line at Britney spears tho ;)
The lessons are organized and categorized in several different ways, which is a must, given the number of lessons available. You can search according to skill level (absolute beginner, beginner, easy, intermediate, advanced and extreme), which saves a lot of time because you don’t have to search through lessons that are too easy, too hard, or just not your thing.
Lesson text is a short summary of the lesson, while the lesson series shows you all of the different videos contained in the series, allowing you to pick whichever one you might want to view. So be aware that one lesson doesn’t usually equal one video. It’s often closer to ten separate videos. Though the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate.

If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.
These last two tabs feel a little bit out of place, and it’s hard to tell whether or not this is content that you will also get if you go through the Guitar Fundamentals course. On the surface, this appears to give you the opportunity to go through a quick intro with the Practice for Beginners and Tuning & Guitar Maintenance tabs, or to jump into a more lengthy process with the Core Learning System.
One great aspect of this site happens to be the song section. The songs can be sorted by style, artist, instructor, difficulty, popularity, and of course genre. They have just about every genre you can imagine (see picture below), common ones like rockabilly, rock, pop and obscure genres like world music and classical. Unlike on Youtube, here you'll find only accurate guitar tabs and high-quality demonstration.
What can be done so that students can play the music they want and build a strong technical foundation? Taking guitar lessons is a great approach. A good guitar instructor can analyze a song a student is wanting to learn, arrange it so that it is playable at a student’s current technical level, and then develop exercises to aid in playing that song.

If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.
Lesson text is a short summary of the lesson, while the lesson series shows you all of the different videos contained in the series, allowing you to pick whichever one you might want to view. So be aware that one lesson doesn’t usually equal one video. It’s often closer to ten separate videos. Though the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate.

If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
Richard Bennett on justinguitar.com! Richard Bennett (www.richard-bennett.com) "There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe."

Pierre Bensusan on justinguitar.com! Pierre Bensuan (www.pierrebensusan.com) "Lucky you, guitar players from all over the world, to take advantage of the tutorials presented in Justin's comprehensive website! Whatever the style you fancy, Justin is there for you with generous and precise guidance to help you enhance your playing and by doing so, introduce you to so many ways of approaching the guitar and discover new artists along the way. I wish there would have been such a medium and decitated host around when I started to learn how to play. Bravo Justin, and my gratitude for bringing music to the heart and ears of many!"


In 2007 he started Chocolate Cake Productions with friend Jed Wardley to release his instructional DVDs. By June 2012 there are 11 DVDs available, including "Master The Major Scale", "Really Useful Strumming Techniques", a "Solo Blues Guitar" series, "The JustinGuitar Beginner's Course" and "Intermediate Method". Sandercoe also publishes a number of electronic books in .pdf format, including "Practical Music Theory", "The Chord Construction Guide" and "Understanding Rhythm Notation", as well as an ongoing series of instructional songbooks, to which entries include the Vintage Songbook, the Rock Songbook, the Pop Songbook, and the Acoustic Songbook.

Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.
By now, you’ve already decided whether to stick with the Guitar or to drop it. If you’re one of the lucky few that stuck with it, in spite of having an extremely busy schedule with work and family obligations, congratulations. Contrary to popular belief, taking the time out for routine Guitar practice has tremendous benefits, even for the busiest of people.

We believe that Guitar practice as an adult is more productive than it seems because it clears your head, it builds patience, discipline and concentration skills which you can transfer over to other parts of life, and it keeps your hand-eye coordination sharp. It also keeps you committed to learning and improvement, which again, are transferable traits to professional life. As role models, parents taking active classes shows kids the importance of pursuing personal interests for life.


The lessons are organized and categorized in several different ways, which is a must, given the number of lessons available. You can search according to skill level (absolute beginner, beginner, easy, intermediate, advanced and extreme), which saves a lot of time because you don’t have to search through lessons that are too easy, too hard, or just not your thing.
You may have trouble finding a guitar teacher who is on the same wavelength you are on. In other posts I’ve recounted my first experiences with a guitar instructor back when I first started playing. The guy did not seem to care one whit about what kind of music I was into or what my goals were as a new musician. He was going to teach me songs he wanted me to learn, not help me explore music that inspired me. Or perhaps he just thought a kid wearing an Ozzy Osbourne t-shirt would also be into Lionel Richie.
I’ve always wanted to play a guitar. My wife bought me a Martin about 6 years ago. I’m a truck dri...ver with very limited time at home for any lessons and practice so that hurt my ability. Saw the Chordbuddy on a YouTube video and after researching it, I decided to purchase one figuring that it was worth a shot at that price. I received it on October 7th and tried it for the first time the next day. Within 15 minutes I was playing Tom Dooley. Within an hour I was playing Head Over Boots by John Pardi which is not in any of the Chordbuddy songbooks. I used an app called Tabs and started looking for songs with the 4 chords G,D,C and Em.
Along with my massive website revamp in 2018, I am remaking and improving many of the modules in this course so don't be surprised if some bits look a little different :) I'm now dividing the 9 stages of the Beginner course into three grades; white (1), yellow (2) and orange (3). As well as the core lessons with practice routines and song suggestions, each grade will have some related lessons on Ear Training, Rhythm Study, Guitar Maintenance, Practical Music Theory to help you understand how music works!
I have heard how giving you are in so many respects of music schooling and I must say that I am impressed. You remind me of the pure idealism that we had in starting Apple. If I were young, with time, I'd likely offer to join and help you in your endeavours. Keep making people happy, not just in their own learning, but in the example you set for them. 
On a day when there's a temptation to go into a dark place, and only see all the bad stuff there is in the world ... greed, cruelty, exploitation, selfishness ... I get days like that pretty often .... it's great to find someone giving out, and giving out good, and operating on an honour basis ... There are so many people who can't afford Guitar lessons .... well, here's a wonderful guy who has set up a whole system of teaching guitar ... Blues, Jazz, Rock, even Songwriting, from the basics, tuning the guitar, etc ... upwards ... If you use his site, it's up to you to determine how much you can contribute ... but this is an amazing site .... he is also very aware of issues in the world which need attention ... a great channel .. Check him out. He's a giver.
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