"My wife found Chris online for guitar lessons for our 7 year old. After just a few weeks, my 7 year old was doing really cool things with his new guitar. Chris sent us printouts of the weekly lessons so my son could practice during the week. And now I've been learning the lessons too. Any teacher who can keep my son's attention for a full half hour (sometimes he even goes over) AND actually teach him something too is a great teacher!"

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Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.
There are hundreds of free guitar lessons here and it's taken a lot of work over nearly 15 years for me to create it all. It's important to me to help everyone that wants to learn to play the guitar, not just those with money for tuition, so I run it on an "honour system" and I rely on the honesty of users like your good self to make a donation if they can afford to.
Did my research over a number of months to decide where my learning hub would be. Guitar tricks won in spades, easy thought out lessons that are short and to the point I also like that so far the videos a only a few mins a piece. Trusted guitar tricks that had no hesitation in subscribing for a yearly sub.my guitar arrives in a few days, cannot wait to take advantage of this brilliant site.
@John Dyhouse: The thing about the chord buddy that is unique is that you can teach yourself quickly. yes you will need to build up your finger pad but you will need to do that anyway without the chord buddy. The main purpose of it is to teach you hand placement, sound, and rythmn first. Then after you have mastered that you can move on to learning more on the topic you are discussing.
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One other cool thing about electric guitars– you can plug them into your computer and use a program like Apple’s Garageband as an amplifier. You can basically have 100’s of classic sounds available virtually. You can “jam” virtually with your computer and create full-on recordings on your laptop. You’ll just need a “pre-amp,” which is a device that amplifies the signal from your guitar before it sends it to your computer. I’d recommend something like the Focusrite Scarlett
Contrary to some other reviewers of this book, I like the book's set-up. New chords are given at the beginning at each stage only. There isn't a section that gives you chord diagrams so it forces you to memorize chord diagrams as you progress through the book rather than rely on convenient chord diagrams above every lyric. It isn't a chord reference book so if you're looking for that, there are plenty of cheap ones on Amazon or even free on the internet.

Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
Minutes 60-600. Pick up the guitar everyday for 20 days for 30 minutes or so. You can do this while you do other things like watch TV or chit chat. Get your fingers used to moving around on the fretboard. Start jamming out some John Denver baby. Please do sing along. Eventually try to keep up with tempo of the changes in the actual song. Once you can change your chords on time, focus on improving your “touch” with your right hand. Strum the chords in a way that it adds texture to the recording (if you are playing along with the man himself.)
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