Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.

Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[8]


One great aspect of this site happens to be the song section. The songs can be sorted by style, artist, instructor, difficulty, popularity, and of course genre. They have just about every genre you can imagine (see picture below), common ones like rockabilly, rock, pop and obscure genres like world music and classical. Unlike on Youtube, here you'll find only accurate guitar tabs and high-quality demonstration.

Selling to sales people is tough. When I walk into a retail music store and speak to the sales people about ChordBuddy, they scoff… at first. In their heads they have a preconceived notion of what my product is and what it does. They see it as a valueless “cheat” and maybe even a threat to their way of doing things. What they don’t expect is me to be prepared for any objection they can throw at me. I rehearse in the mirror, I practice, I come up with reasons not to buy my product they haven’t even thought of. I am so prepared to swat away objections like flies when I walk into a store, they can’t help but buy from me. Retailers are better equipped to sell my product because a wonderful byproduct of my objection swatting, is that they are now better equipped to sell the product.
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This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.
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