I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself.
Guitar Gopher....I had walked away from learning guitar with instructor years back, but I had been playing and learning on my own...the sound is there but at times it sucks....we set up practice time with experience players sometimes its above what I know.....so I shy away slowly until I'm outside the building....trying to think what that was all about....but now I've come upon your set of learning the 5 steps to learning guitar...I'll start all over to give a try one more time on your suggestion about playing guitar....thank you for your counseling and giving guidance....you made a great recommendation, thanks for the opinions.
One other cool thing about electric guitars– you can plug them into your computer and use a program like Apple’s Garageband as an amplifier. You can basically have 100’s of classic sounds available virtually. You can “jam” virtually with your computer and create full-on recordings on your laptop. You’ll just need a “pre-amp,” which is a device that amplifies the signal from your guitar before it sends it to your computer. I’d recommend something like the Focusrite Scarlett
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
AGE CAN’T HINDER YOU – Working off of muscle memory and visual assistance, ChordBuddy is designed for players of every age. In fact, ChordBuddy is well-suited for those looking to play guitar with arthritis, offering a pain-free method of playing your favorite song. Utilizing ChordBuddy also allows you to learn the guitar on your own, eliminating the need for long guitar lessons with an instructor, which can result in prolonged joint pain.
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