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This is not a substitute for learning scales. At some point down the road you are going to want to dive into music theory at least a little bit, if nothing else so you can understand how scales work and how chords are built. For now you are a beginner, and this exercise can go a long way toward loosening up your fretting hand and improving your technique.

When you play the right note or chord, you will hear it. It will be a pleasant sound, it will be clear and won't have any blocked string sounds (unless it needs to, but you'll get to that later). To play a note or chord correctly, you have to get your fingers in the right position and press as hard as you can on the frets; it will become a habit if you practice enough.


Thinking you can use this chord buddy video to learn how to play guitar is like thinking you can use... Tiger Woods golf clubs to win the masters. Knowing which strings to target when you strum and when to switch chords is much more challenging than he makes it look. Having a professional guitarist play using the device to show how easy it is to play is deceptive. See More
Also, once you get to an intermediate level, the above sites will be able to keep you moving forward, all the way to advanced. I only have beginner-intermediate lessons, so I see it as natural progression to move from my lessons to the more advanced lessons of one of the above sites. These 2 sites are the sources I can truly recommend from both quality and cost efficiency point of views.
Now we're getting somewhere! In order to become skillful on the guitar, we'll need to build the muscles in our hands, and learn to stretch our fingers. Scales are a good, albeit a not very exciting way to do this. Before we start, look at the diagram above to understand how fingers on the "fretting hand" (the hand that plays notes on the neck) are commonly identified. The thumb is labeled as "T", the index finger is the "first finger", the middle finger is the "second finger", and so on.
* Finger tapping - Made popular by Eddie Van Halen (listen to Eruption), finger tapping is one of the easiest guitar tricks to learn that will make you sound like you are playing something totally complex even though you are not. To finger tap, use a finger of your guitar picking hand to play notes on the fretboard by pressing notes down then pulling them off to notes of the fretting hand. It's common to use the middle finger for tapping so that you can keep a hold of the guitar pick.
What can be done so that students can play the music they want and build a strong technical foundation? Taking guitar lessons is a great approach. A good guitar instructor can analyze a song a student is wanting to learn, arrange it so that it is playable at a student’s current technical level, and then develop exercises to aid in playing that song.

Now, check to see how you did. While still holding down the chord with your fretting hand, play each string (starting with the sixth) one at a time, listening to be sure each note rings out clearly. If not, study your hand to determine why it doesn't. Are you pressing hard enough? Is one of your other fingers touching that string, which is preventing it from sounding properly? These are the most common reasons why a note does not sound. If you're having trouble, read this feature on getting your chords to ring clearly.
I have to admit – I’ve always wanted to be a rock star ! When Travis entered the tank I knew Chordbuddy might be the only way for me to achieve my dream. Years later we know who the real rock star of this story is – Travis. I did this deal because I could see the passion he had for teaching guitar. He truly wants to share music with the the world and developed a foolproof system for learning one of the most common instruments. More than that – I loved that he invented ChordBuddy so his daughter would share his love for music – true dedication to his craft and his family! Four years after making the deal, there is no shortage of ChordBuddy success stories and I know that this simple and innovative product is the only guitar learning system you’ll ever need to be a rock star like Travis.

Hopefully, you've found, bought or borrowed a guitar pick. If not, you'll need to buy yourself some. Don't be stingy, go and pick up at least 10 of them — guitar picks are easy to lose (they often don't cost more than 30 or 40 cents each). You can experiment with different shapes and brands, but I highly recommend medium gauge picks to start; ones that aren't too flimsy, or too hard.


In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
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