I have been studying guitar off and on since age 10. I have had several instructors over the years but most of them didn't have a solid game plan, a horizon or timeline toward getting to the next level. Plus it was expensive. As technology evolved more Youtube videos came online. I tried teaching myself from the videos but the process and information was fragmented. Watching them felt like lessons from those in person instructors. I googled best online guitar courses and found Guitartricks rated at the top so I took a chance. I will tell you this, if you have the patience and dedication, and follow the course, especially Fundamentals I and II, you will be amazed at how quickly you will advance. As with any endeavor worth undertaking, it isn't easy. But, my instructor, Lisa McCormick, developed the Core system and she nailed it. Her gentle nudging even paced approach has helped me improve my playing and understanding of the guitar way beyond my expectations. The Guitartricks system is every bit a road map to get you from beginner to advanced, or if you choose, to be able to play some songs if that's your goal. A well thought out intuitive interface to navigate through your journey toward playing guitar. Two thumbs up Guitartricks!!!


If you're an adult finally getting around to learning your dream instrument or a child following your passion of playing music I tailor your lessons specifically to you. We look at what you want to play, pick specific songs that you want to learn, and learn the techniques you need to play these songs. It sounds simple, but it's so effective and much more fun to learn this way!
* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
NOTE! We get asked all the time why a guitar educational company with so many advanced courses would offer such a simple solution to learning guitar without having to learn how to read music, learn theory or work through a more "formal" learning methodology. The answer is really simple; you never stop learning music but you do have to start. If your introduction to music is boring, tedious and generally a struggle, you'll likely pack the guitar up in its case and stick it in the closet. If it's fun, engaging and you can prove to yourself that you can really do it, then you'll spend a lifetime enjoying and learning guitar. Hopefully, TrueFire and our massive library of instruction will enhance that lifetime of enjoyment.

I’m super excited for this post as it’s the culmination of some of the biggest names in online guitar lesson providers coming together to offer their advice and insights on guitar chords. Understanding the right way to play guitar chords is one of the first things you’ll learn as a beginner guitar player. It can also be quite frustrating when you are just starting out.That’s why I decided it would be a great idea to get a bunch of experts together all giving their insight into learning more about the wonderful world of guitar chords. I basically asked everyone two questions:
For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.

In other words, all of the guitar gods throughout music history played an instrument essentially like the one you own. It’s not like they have some kind of advantage, aside from their talent and experience. The same notes and chords they play are available on your guitar, and while it may take a lot of hard work on your part, you can play them too if you want to.
When playing the guitar sitting down, the body of the guitar will rest on one of your legs. In most styles of guitar playing, the guitar will rest on the leg farthest away from the headstock. This means, a person playing the guitar in a right-handed fashion will typically rest the guitar on his/her right leg, while someone playing the guitar in a lefty manner will rest it on their left leg. (NOTE: proper classical guitarist technique dictates the exact OPPOSITE of the above, but for this lesson, let's stick to our initial explanation)
Sandercoe has played concerts around the world with a variety of acts, including The Brit Awards 2004; The Johnny Vaughn house band 2005; live on the Today Show in the United States in 2006; the UK and European tour with Katie Melua in 2006 & 2007 which included The World Music Awards, the Live Earth Concert in Hamburg, the North Sea Jazz Festival in Rotterdam and the German ECHO awards.
Tapping is a technique where the right hand taps a string and alternates with notes played by the left hand. A basic way you can start tapping is to find three notes that you want to play on one string and play them as triplets using this sequence: tap, pull-off, pull-off. The first note is tapped with your index or middle finger and then pulls-off onto a note held by one of the left hand fingers, which is then pulled-off onto another note held by a left hand finger. Other ways to tap are to use more right hand fingers, use open strings, and to use different rhythms.
Guitar Tricks is described as a 'step-by-step curriculum' and it really does live up to that phrase. I appreciate the simplicity of the step-by-step nature in the structure of the site and the way all the classes and songs I watched were presented. You know exactly where to go next (although of course you are not limited to the pathway – you are free to go wherever you like and explore, return, repeat as much as you like).
Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
Determine the guitar riff that you want to learn. Listen to acoustic guitar songs that you enjoy and choose one that you'd like to learn. When finding your first song, try to find a song that has an easy chord progression. Listen to the song and determine how many chord changes it has and the speed in which the song is played. If there aren't that many chords or the song seems simple to play, you should choose that song as your first song to learn.
Italiano: Imparare velocemente a Suonare la chitarra Acustica, Español: aprender rápidamente a tocar la guitarra por tu cuenta, Français: rapidement apprendre soi même à jouer de la guitare acoustique, Deutsch: Gitarren spielen lernen, Português: Aprender Rápido a Tocar Violão Sozinho, Nederlands: Snel akoestische gitaar leren spelen, 中文: 自学原声吉他速成指南, Русский: самостоятельно быстро научиться играть на акустической гитаре, Bahasa Indonesia: Belajar Gitar Akustik Sendiri Dengan Cepat, ไทย: ฝึกกีตาร์โปร่งให้เป็นเร็วด้วยตัวเอง, العربية: تعلم العزف على الجيتار الصوتي بنفسك
In the “classical” world, composers would oftentimes write musical studies called “etudes.” These pieces would generally be musically pleasing, but the sole purpose was to develop an instrumentalist’s playing technique. Examples of these can be seen in classical guitar music, where many pieces have the same right hand arpeggio pattern that remains constant throughout the entire piece.
You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).
After the 3 Stages, we have an Essential Skills module which you could check out any time you want - it's stuff that you'll find super helpful on your journey :) You'll probably find my Practical Music Theory course super fun if you're the type who likes to understand what they're doing - it's not essential for beginners but most people seem to really enjoy it!
While four years old is a little young for formal guitar lessons, it's not too early to begin teaching your child musical concepts that will be important once they are old enough for guitar instruction at School of Rock. Your 4-year-old can participate in the Little Wing music program to learn fundamental concepts through fun, dynamic musical activities. 

It’s a shame this app with excellent content is almost unusable. The app’s buttons (back button etc) when in a lesson frequently become unresponsive . The video control buttons disappear randomly. And there is no way to play the videos in landscape mode, which is basic stuff! I am using iPhone 6 with latest iOS. All in all the app quality does grave injustice to the awesome content. At the minimum, the unresponsive buttons, disappearing video controls (pause, forward/rewind, no skip back 10 seconds!) and lack of landscape mode video must be fixed on priority. Eventually the app must rewritten by some quality/experienced app developers and experts in mobile app user interface/experience . The great content in the app deserves better software for presenting it! Had it not been for the awesome content, I would have given it 1 star.
On the GuitarTricks forum, you risk to get lost reading threads for hours, and forget to take some lessons! They have both open community discussions and subscriber only sections, that way you will not feel left out before getting a paid membership. In conclusion, Guitar Tricks has tons of lessons and learning material and it has hours of fun when your guitar practice is over!
This is why it’s important to have someone that holds you accountable for prolonging your learning and practicing, regardless of whether it’s a musical instrument, or a sport, or any other after-school matter. Someone to keep you motivated. And if you decide to make your passion a profession, someone to guide you along the way on how to find the right opportunities for paid gigs, or even a full-time career in playing the Guitar.
Now we're getting somewhere! In order to become skillful on the guitar, we'll need to build the muscles in our hands, and learn to stretch our fingers. Scales are a good, albeit a not very exciting way to do this. Before we start, look at the diagram above to understand how fingers on the "fretting hand" (the hand that plays notes on the neck) are commonly identified. The thumb is labeled as "T", the index finger is the "first finger", the middle finger is the "second finger", and so on.
Let's stick with three chord songs in our I-IV-V progressions, but we can now do the same songs in the key of A (A-D-E) and in the key of D (D-G-A). So, if a three chord song didn't sound quite right before in the key of A or wasn't great for your singing range, now try it in the key of D (use D instead of A, use G instead of D, and use A instead of E).
Similar to not just focusing on learning songs… let’s say that you learn your Am Pentatonic Scale (this is a very commonly used scale in guitar playing) and you practice and practice until you can play it cleanly and quickly. So you show it to your friends. Do they care? Probably not, it’s just a scale.  Instead of letting this happen to you, we will show you how to use this scale (and all of the other things you will learn).  We will make sure that you know how the different scales, chords, theory, rhythms, etc can all be applied to learning your favorite songs quickly, writing your own songs, improvising your own awesome solos on the fly, playing with a band, and much more!

From a practical perspective, teaching yourself guitar may be the only option. Guitar lessons cost money. If you’ve just scrounged your pennies together in order to afford a decent starter guitar, you may not be eager to throw down another twenty bucks a week or more. Compound this with the fact that most guitar instructors have their own methods and will teach you at their pace, not yours. This makes sense from their standpoint, but it could get a little frustrating and expensive from your point of view.


As a musician, learning songs for whichever instrument you are playing is one of the best exercises. Not only do you get to practice your chops but you also get to learn exactly how a particular song is played. As a beginner/intermediate guitar player, learning songs is all about knowing where to put your fingers on the fretboard, listening to the strumming patterns used, and taking note of any special techniques or chord combinations. Being aware of these things as you learn songs will help you become a better guitar player and composer. However, as a new/intermediate guitar player, you

This is a HUGE one. Many people that learn to play guitar are fine when they are playing by themselves, but when it’s time to play with others or in front of friends and family…what happens? They freeze up!  This is largely due to not being shown how to be confident with their playing and not having a system of learning in place that will push them and grow them to be able to play music with others and show off what they can do.  Not being able to play with others or in front of people is one of the worst feelings ever, so don’t let this be you!
Accessible from the left sidebar, the Beginner’s Course features nine main stages (eleven if you include the initial module and the new ‘Master Rock Power Chords’ stage), with more than 100 video lessons in total. This course starts with the essential basics – such as the guitar’s anatomy and how to tune the instrument – before moving through chords, power chords, picking exercises, practice schedules and more.

Now, pick up your guitar, and hold it so the back of the body of the instrument comes in contact with your stomach/chest, and the bottom of the neck runs parallel to the floor. The thickest string on the guitar should be the closest to your face, while the thinnest should be closest to the floor. If this isn't the case, turn the guitar the in other direction. Typically, a right-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the left, whereas a left-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the right.
Steve Vai on justinguitar.com! Steve Vai (www.vai.com) "I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself."
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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