Some instructors spend too much time talking about theory and other things mixed right in with the middle of the song instruction, irrelevant to actually learning the song, and then fly way to rapidly though the chords, progressions and riffs, making learning difficult and multiple rewinds and replays necessary. (Example; Behind Blue Eyes by Mark Olesky. )

School of Rock has a finely-tuned preschoolers program called Little Wing that offers all the benefits of our beginner lessons, but is tailored to capture the attention of these young students and set them on a path towards music proficiency. Through playful exploration of rhythm, song structure, and melody kids are introduced to the guitar and other instruments.
The lessons are organized and categorized in several different ways, which is a must, given the number of lessons available. You can search according to skill level (absolute beginner, beginner, easy, intermediate, advanced and extreme), which saves a lot of time because you don’t have to search through lessons that are too easy, too hard, or just not your thing.

Unfortunately, before you begin playing, you'll really need to tune your guitar. The problem is, it is, at first, a relatively difficult task, one that becomes much easier over time. If you know of anyone who plays guitar, who could do the job for you, it is advised that you get them to tune your instrument. Alternately, you could invest in a "guitar tuner," a relatively inexpensive device which listens to the sound of each string and advises you (via a few blinking lights) on what you need to do in order to get the note in tune.
When you play the right note or chord, you will hear it. It will be a pleasant sound, it will be clear and won't have any blocked string sounds (unless it needs to, but you'll get to that later). To play a note or chord correctly, you have to get your fingers in the right position and press as hard as you can on the frets; it will become a habit if you practice enough.
Fact is that thousands of popular songs can be played with 8 simple chords or less. Learn just the A chord, D chord and E chord and you'll be able to play hundreds of blues, folk, pop and rock songs. Why is this so? Because rock, pop, folk and blues songwriters all use the same handful of chords - it's their melodies and arrangements that make their songs distinctive, NOT the chords they are using in the song.

Do you want to start guitar lessons but you're wondering how long it will take you to see the payoff? Or, have you already started and you're wondering if you're really making progress? Guitar teacher Peter M. shares just how long it really takes most students to learn guitar... This age old question has been asked by nearly all of my students for as long as I’ve been teaching: how long will it take to learn how to play guitar? Will it take a week? A month? A year? Longer? And the answer i
Sound familiar? I know what that’s like… I’ve been there, and I’ve had several students that have been there. Playing the same licks, the same riffs, the same songs on your guitar over and over and over again just gets old so fast.  You’re willing to put in the work, you’re willing to practice hard, BUT WHAT SHOULD YOU PRACTICE?? HOW CAN I LEARN TO BE CREATIVE? IF ONLY I COULD PLAY THAT ONE SOLO!
Now this of course does not mean that we won’t do songs, as playing your favorite songs is a very fun and good part of playing guitar. What this means is that instead of falling into the trap of just learning one song, then another, then another and never actually learning how things work, we will be sure to show you HOW SONGS WORK so that when you learn or play a song you can learn it by understanding the core idea of the song instead of trying to memorize the several hundred individual notes that are inside of the song.  Basically, we will make sure you understand how music works so that you are free to have fun not just learning and memorizing songs, but also by playing on the fly or writing your own songs!
This class is perfect for beginners who are ready to build their guitar repertoire. You’ll learn the major scale, both vertically and horizontally, as well as open position scales. Barre chords and basic chords in open position will give you a great starting point for the rest of your guitar journey. Once you get down these essentials you’ll be ready to take on any new challenges!

Minutes 60-600. Pick up the guitar everyday for 20 days for 30 minutes or so. You can do this while you do other things like watch TV or chit chat. Get your fingers used to moving around on the fretboard. Start jamming out some John Denver baby. Please do sing along. Eventually try to keep up with tempo of the changes in the actual song. Once you can change your chords on time, focus on improving your “touch” with your right hand. Strum the chords in a way that it adds texture to the recording (if you are playing along with the man himself.)
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