Shark Tank, a popular American reality television series on ABC, started its 5th season this September. For those who are unfamiliar, Shark Tank portrays the initial pitch between investors and entrepreneurs in a shortened televised format. There are many deals made on the show, but after due diligence that’s done afterwards, about half of those deals actually come to fruition.
Some young players get the idea that you have to first master basic chords and scales before you can move on to playing songs you know by bands you love. Not so. Of course if you are into classical music, progressive metal or jazz that may be true, but you might be surprised to know that much of the rock and country music you hear is based around very simple chord progressions.

* Make your guitar talk - With a little practice, a whammy bar and a wah wah effect pedal you can make your guitar talk by simulating voices. The trick here is to start with the whammy bar depressed and raise it up while fretting notes and sliding to other notes. Try making words by alternating between depressing and releasing the bar during note changes. The wah wah pedal (or a phaser pedal) helps to give it this trick a more vocal sound.
Ryan was great! He's obviously a talented guitarist and he is very laid back and makes you feel comfortable. He shows you in detail what you need to do to become a better guitar player. My ONLY advice, and the reason he doesn't get 5 stars, is I think he should have more visual aids with his lessons. For example, write down the different scales or transcribe the first several measures of a song. Then, one has something to refer back to when you are practicing and invariably get stuck. Other than that, I would highly recommend Ryan as a guitar teacher!

If you alternate fretted notes with open strings you can create a cascading sound of awesomeness. The video below describes how you can take a scale and substitute as many fretted notes as you want with open strings (E, A, D, G, B, E). The beginning of the lick in the video starts off by descending the G Mixolydian scale (G, A, B, C, D, E, F) from G: G (fretted), F (fretted), E (open), D (fretted), C (fretted), B (open), A (fretted), G (fretted). The video below shows the rest of the lick. This second video demonstrates descending and ascending scales while using open strings!
"Working with Chris Pinon is an absolute pleasure. First, he is a professional! He knows his stuff, and is enthusiastic to share his knowledge in a way that will speak to his students. He is approachable, funny, and flexible. He works with his students to help them achieve their goals. After many years of taking different guitar classes and guitar lessons with a variety of teachers, Chris has been my best teacher to date! I really enjoy the online component, because he is able to express his knowledge, hone technique, and share documents instantaneously. His multiple camera setup allows for close-ups of chord shapes, a face shot so you feel like you're in the room with him, and sheet music display. Chris is organized, linear, and present, both online and in person. Online lessons with him have opened up a world of possibility for my guitar and ukulele playing! The website is easy to navigate and payment goes without a hitch. I feel very lucky to be a student of Chris Pinon's."

Sound familiar? I know what that’s like… I’ve been there, and I’ve had several students that have been there. Playing the same licks, the same riffs, the same songs on your guitar over and over and over again just gets old so fast.  You’re willing to put in the work, you’re willing to practice hard, BUT WHAT SHOULD YOU PRACTICE?? HOW CAN I LEARN TO BE CREATIVE? IF ONLY I COULD PLAY THAT ONE SOLO!
Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)
To quote Alec Baldwin's character in the movie The Edge: What one man can do another can do. He was only trying to kill a Grizzly Bear with a stick, which may seem easier than copping Eddie Van Halen. Paraphrasing and putting this in terms that work for us: What one guitar player can do another can do. Really, the deciding factor is how hard you want to work at it.
I have to admit – I’ve always wanted to be a rock star ! When Travis entered the tank I knew Chordbuddy might be the only way for me to achieve my dream. Years later we know who the real rock star of this story is – Travis. I did this deal because I could see the passion he had for teaching guitar. He truly wants to share music with the the world and developed a foolproof system for learning one of the most common instruments. More than that – I loved that he invented ChordBuddy so his daughter would share his love for music – true dedication to his craft and his family! Four years after making the deal, there is no shortage of ChordBuddy success stories and I know that this simple and innovative product is the only guitar learning system you’ll ever need to be a rock star like Travis.
The web has a vast number of resources available for learning how to play guitar. You can learn how to play fancy scales, play songs, learn to solo, and much more. The trouble is, there just aren't many good guitar lessons available to someone looking to start playing guitar. These guitar lessons are designed for people who own (or have borrowed) a guitar, but don't yet know the first thing about playing it.
All courses are available as instant downloads, on disc, or as streaming video on our website and mobile apps for iOS and Android. Study anywhere, anytime in the format of your choice. Interactive features and functions include standard notation, Power Tab, Guitar Pro, jam tracks, playback controls, video looping, slow-mo, tuner, metronome and other learning tools.
Now that your Chordbuddy is in its proper placement and angled upwards, all you need to do is retighten the screw. Be sure to make it fairly tight so that it doesn’t move around as you start playing. Once that’s done, try playing all of your guitar strings without pressing down on any buttons. If the strings all ring clearly, you’ve properly installed the Chordbuddy. Here’s what it should look like when it’s installed.
Hopefully, you've found, bought or borrowed a guitar pick. If not, you'll need to buy yourself some. Don't be stingy, go and pick up at least 10 of them — guitar picks are easy to lose (they often don't cost more than 30 or 40 cents each). You can experiment with different shapes and brands, but I highly recommend medium gauge picks to start; ones that aren't too flimsy, or too hard.
Thinking you can use this chord buddy video to learn how to play guitar is like thinking you can use... Tiger Woods golf clubs to win the masters. Knowing which strings to target when you strum and when to switch chords is much more challenging than he makes it look. Having a professional guitarist play using the device to show how easy it is to play is deceptive. See More
Fact is that thousands of popular songs can be played with 8 simple chords or less. Learn just the A chord, D chord and E chord and you'll be able to play hundreds of blues, folk, pop and rock songs. Why is this so? Because rock, pop, folk and blues songwriters all use the same handful of chords - it's their melodies and arrangements that make their songs distinctive, NOT the chords they are using in the song.
Because people learn in a variety of different ways, the flexibility of the online guitar lessons that you choose will be important. You may prefer to progress through a series of programs or you may want to jump around and pick whatever interests you. Not all online guitar lessons work in the same way, so you will want to consider which programs offer the best “fit” for the way you learn best.
Minutes 60-600. Pick up the guitar everyday for 20 days for 30 minutes or so. You can do this while you do other things like watch TV or chit chat. Get your fingers used to moving around on the fretboard. Start jamming out some John Denver baby. Please do sing along. Eventually try to keep up with tempo of the changes in the actual song. Once you can change your chords on time, focus on improving your “touch” with your right hand. Strum the chords in a way that it adds texture to the recording (if you are playing along with the man himself.)
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