My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.
Barbara Corcoran states that she is going to offer one hundred and seventy five thousand dollars, in exchange for a twenty percent stake in Chord Buddy. However, fifty thousand dollars of the total investment must be used to make an infomercial, because Barbara Corcoran thinks that Chord Buddy is a great product, but Travis Perry is a great person as well. He needs to sell himself in an infomercial, in order to sell his product.
For those of you who play guitar, you might have noticed that some of my tasty licks aren’t so tasty. I’m no Stevie Ray Vaughn. You don’t need to be superstar to have tons of fun with this stuff. Despite not being the best guitar player, I’ve played my songs in front of 1000’s of people in live venues, had songs I’ve written and recorded played on San Diego’s leading rock station, and played in some super cool seedy dive bars to drunken hipsters. That’s just a few among a countless other memorable experiences. You don’t need to be a genius– half the battle is just showing up.
The idea here is to work on your fretting hand dexterity, but you’ll also want to employ good picking technique. When you get good at the most basic version of this exercise you can move it around the fingerboard and practice it at different frets. You can also vary your fingering to make it more challenging, and you can change up your picking pattern.
Now we're getting somewhere! In order to become skillful on the guitar, we'll need to build the muscles in our hands, and learn to stretch our fingers. Scales are a good, albeit a not very exciting way to do this. Before we start, look at the diagram above to understand how fingers on the "fretting hand" (the hand that plays notes on the neck) are commonly identified. The thumb is labeled as "T", the index finger is the "first finger", the middle finger is the "second finger", and so on.
The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.
I bet that you’ve even tried other methods to figure it out. Spending hours on YouTube and google searching for some guitar method that will get you to the level you want, just to get bogged down in the TRUCKLOADS of seemingly unrelated material… Getting some friends that play guitar to show you something here and there, learning some songs off of tabs that are sometimes right and sometimes terribly, terribly wrong just to find that you’re stuck playing the same old things without knowing what to do next.
Now, that we know about the basic parts of a guitar, it's time to get our hands dirty and start learning to play it. Get yourself an armless chair, and take a seat. You should be sitting comfortably, with your back against the back of the chair. Slouching significantly is a no-no; you'll not only end up with a sore back, you'll develop bad habits on the guitar.
Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)

The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.


Justin Sandercoe has thought long and hard about how to teach people to play the guitar, and how to do this over the internet. He has come up with a well-designed series of courses that will take you from nowhere to proficiency. I tried to learn how to play years ago, using books, and got nowhere. I've been using Justin's site for just over a year and I feel I've made real progress. What's more, Justin offers his lessons for free - a boon for any young player who has the urge to play, but whose pockets are empty. I've seen and used other sites for learners: none of them offer as clearly marked a road as Justin does.
The idea here is to work on your fretting hand dexterity, but you’ll also want to employ good picking technique. When you get good at the most basic version of this exercise you can move it around the fingerboard and practice it at different frets. You can also vary your fingering to make it more challenging, and you can change up your picking pattern.
You can visit and purchase Chord Buddy and accessories by visiting the official website at https://www.chordbuddy.com. The website looks very professionally designed, which tells me that the business itself is up, running and profitable. The Chord Buddy still costs $49,95, which is not a lot if you think about what you can do with it. You can also purchase several different guitars in combination with a Chord Buddy, if you wish to do so.
Justin Sandercoe has thought long and hard about how to teach people to play the guitar, and how to do this over the internet. He has come up with a well-designed series of courses that will take you from nowhere to proficiency. I tried to learn how to play years ago, using books, and got nowhere. I've been using Justin's site for just over a year and I feel I've made real progress. What's more, Justin offers his lessons for free - a boon for any young player who has the urge to play, but whose pockets are empty. I've seen and used other sites for learners: none of them offer as clearly marked a road as Justin does.
Whilst the experienced lessons focus on the three genres specifically to take you from basic to advanced, further genres are accessed below in a tab called 'Styles'. (This is the same webpage accessed by the 4th area called 'Learn Styles of Guitar' on the home page.) The additional genres are Acoustic, Bluegrass, Classical, Funk and Soul, Jazz, Metal, Rockabilly, Surf, and finally, World.

I've started off a new series with the awesome Ariel Posen, The Captains Privates series is popular as ever and I've also been filling in some beginner lessons of things I get asked about all the time... I'm about to re-kindle the Blues Lead 3 series which fell off the wagon somewhere and also get the gear videos rocking again... so lots in the works, lots going on and still loving it!


The first thing I did when I got the Chordbuddy was I took it out of the box and try to attach it to my guitar. Now, I did do some reading up prior to receiving the Chordbuddy and one of the biggest problem that came up was that people just weren’t able to attach it to their guitar properly. Without reading the instructions, I of course, had the same problem. However, once you know how to properly install the Chordbuddy (which I’ll explain in the next section), you should have no troubles.
In the “classical” world, composers would oftentimes write musical studies called “etudes.” These pieces would generally be musically pleasing, but the sole purpose was to develop an instrumentalist’s playing technique. Examples of these can be seen in classical guitar music, where many pieces have the same right hand arpeggio pattern that remains constant throughout the entire piece.

Justin was named as one of the UK's Top 10 YouTube Celebrities on The Telegraph Newspaper [3] and The Independent newspaper called him "one of the most influential guitar teachers in history" [1] and he has received accolades from many notable guitarists, including Steve Vai, Mark Knopfler, Brian May,[4] Richard Bennett, and Martin Taylor, among others.
We were privileged to have worked with hundreds of top artists and educators who authored the original magazine articles and then recorded audio lessons in their own studios. While video is the medium of choice today, these 1,200+ audio lessons still deliver amazing instruction from some of the best in the biz — perfect for those long drives and commutes!
PS If you’ve read this far, then you probably are at least thinking about taking the next step.  Stop thinking about it and doubting in yourself, you want this, so take the action necessary to achieve your goals and  continue towards becoming an amazing rock guitar player right now! You won’t regret at least giving it a try, but you probably will regret it if you don’t.
This class is perfect for beginners who are ready to build their guitar repertoire. You’ll learn the major scale, both vertically and horizontally, as well as open position scales. Barre chords and basic chords in open position will give you a great starting point for the rest of your guitar journey. Once you get down these essentials you’ll be ready to take on any new challenges!
There’s only one thing I would comment on, and that is GF1 and 2 is lead by the same person, and the only songs you’re going to be playing are what I’d term as country love songs. If you’re ok with that, then you’re all set. If (like me) this sort of music grates on you, you’re going to find 1&2 very hard, and like me you’ll need to find some other way of practicing the lessons.
Wow! This post really seems to have helped a lot of folks get started with the guitar. It has been read by – I kid you not – millions of aspiring guitarists. Thank you! As many of you have noted in the comments below, no, I’m not selling anything here related to playing the guitar. My motivation to write this post was that musicians, and especially guitar teachers, can often make learning the guitar sound way too hard. It’s actually easy.
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