I have one question for you Kristi! You talked about “Directory Listening Discovery”, point is all these sites will be business listening directories like Yelp, Tripadvisor, Foursquare etc that we mostly use for local business listing (earn new citations). It is necessary to have business physical address to list your business on these sites, so what you think about those businesses that don’t have their physical address as they are just providing online services?
Thanks Asim! I know agencies still list themselves on local directories even though they are providing services nationwide or globally. So even if you don't have a physical store or place that customers go, that can still be listed to get those directory listings. If you have no address at all, it would be better to focus on niche-specific directories as opposed to local directories. But I'd only go for those that appear in search results for keywords that you are targeting or ones that are linked to reputable organizations in your industry.

Though each company organizes its marketing team based on its unique culture, budget, and expected outcomes, you can choose from three general approaches to take: do-it-yourself (DIY), in-house, or outsourced. Each one has pros, cons, and cost variations to consider and thoroughly evaluate before making the best choice for your company. Often, the ideal approach is a hybrid one that optimizes existing resources and areas of expertise (such as technical content development) and focuses outsourced efforts on marketing gaps.
If you're struggling to think of more keywords people might be searching about a specific topic, go to Google.com and take a look at the related search terms that appear when you plug in a keyword. When you type in your phrase and scroll to the bottom of Google's results, you'll notice some suggestions for searches related to your original input. These keywords can spark ideas for other keywords you may want to take into consideration.

The only way to start a business venture with confidence is to develop a good marketing plan—one that's backed up with facts and research. This document clearly shows how you'll attract customers to your product or service and persuade them to buy. The marketing plan also builds confidence with financial institutions, showing lenders that your business has a good chance of being successful.


Be sure to re-evaluate these keywords every few months -- once a quarter is a good benchmark, but some businesses like to do it even more often than that. As you gain even more authority in the SERPs, you'll find that you can add more and more keywords to your lists to tackle as you work on maintaining your current presence, and then growing in new areas on top of that.
If your agency’s numbers are in the green, you’ve likely received a message or two from interested acquirers. Agency buyers will send out inquiries to see how receptive you are to selling your company and get more specific information to assess its value. If you’re sitting on a list of these potential buyers already, make sure you’ve researched each to ensure they’re legitimate. You’ll want to give short, honest answers to each of the questions they ask so they can give an accurate assessment of your company’s worth. And, of course, don’t discuss any sensitive business information until the potential buyer signs a confidentiality agreement.

Hold a social media contest. A great way to get instant likes and shares and build an audience is to give your potential customers a great reason to follow you on social media! A great time to try this is when you are holding a  sale, or before a big event such as the super bowl or local Houston Festivals and even conventions. Thrive’s social media brand management and social marketing teams are skilled in growing your social presence with fun tactics like these.


The classic quantification of a marketing plan appears in the form of budgets. Because these are so rigorously quantified, they are particularly important. They should, thus, represent an unequivocal projection of actions and expected results. What is more, they should be capable of being monitored accurately; and, indeed, performance against budget is the main (regular) management review process.
Though it's not clear, behind the corporate objectives, which in themselves offer the main context for the marketing plan, will lie the "corporate mission," in turn provides the context for these corporate objectives. In a sales-oriented organization, the marketing planning function designs incentive pay plans to not only motivate and reward frontline staff fairly but also to align marketing activities with corporate mission. The marketing plan basically aims to make the business provide the solution with the awareness with the expected customers.
×