* Visualization - Learn faster by using visualization techniques. In other words, see yourself / imagine yourself doing what you want to be able to do. Try to recreate the images of you completing a recent guitar lesson you have had or a guitar related task in your mind as clearly as possible. Visualization is proven to increase the time it takes to learn a subject because it tricks your brain into thinking it already knows how to do things.
Now, check to see how you did. While still holding down the chord with your fretting hand, play each string (starting with the sixth) one at a time, listening to be sure each note rings out clearly. If not, study your hand to determine why it doesn't. Are you pressing hard enough? Is one of your other fingers touching that string, which is preventing it from sounding properly? These are the most common reasons why a note does not sound. If you're having trouble, read this feature on getting your chords to ring clearly.

Tapping is a technique where the right hand taps a string and alternates with notes played by the left hand. A basic way you can start tapping is to find three notes that you want to play on one string and play them as triplets using this sequence: tap, pull-off, pull-off. The first note is tapped with your index or middle finger and then pulls-off onto a note held by one of the left hand fingers, which is then pulled-off onto another note held by a left hand finger. Other ways to tap are to use more right hand fingers, use open strings, and to use different rhythms.
You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).
Each song is very well laid out and easy to understand, especially for beginners. It is recommended to play these songs along with a metronome so that you can also practice your tempo and rhythm as you begin playing guitar. Alternatively, if you don’t know how the song goes, you can also play the original song in the background as you play along with it.
"He laid out the lesson very well and I felt as an absolute beginner that was just getting into it, that I learned a lot just in that 45 minutes. He gave detailed notes that I could easily follow while practicing and made sure to explain everything and answer all my questions. He was punctual on time, which I appreciated, and even when he thought he might be running a little late, he texted me to let me know that he might be. Considering his background and the variety of music that he has in his repertoire I really appreciate the style and professionalism that he's going to bring to our lessons. I sought him out specifically over everyone else because of this very fact as that speaks to me, as someone with a music background, of someone that is flexible and willing to not only teach but still learn themselves. I find that invaluable in a teacher and appreciate that."
If you have ever wanted to write a song or produce a track, this is the section that will give you the lowdown on these topics. You will find complete courses on things such as music theory, technique, ear training and song writing. These are free to use, although – as we mention below – there is a charge for progressing past Grade 2 in the Theory course.
Though this decision can be based on preference, we think the best guitar for a beginner is the acoustic guitar. Classical guitars have a wider neck, which can be hard for younger students or physically smaller individuals to handle when learning guitar chords. Meanwhile, the electric guitar is designed to be played with an amplifier, which comes at an additional cost. Acoustic guitars are simple and require little to no additional equipment, making them ideal for beginner guitarists.
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