Many business owners (mistakenly) treat their website as if it were an online brochure. This is a serious error! Your website is not a brochure, it’s a virtual sales rep with a built-in sales funnel (and if it’s not, it should be!). But, no matter how great your website is, it can’t generate leads and sales without traffic. Let Blue Corona show you how to create an online marketing strategy that works—transforming your web presence into a lead generation empire!
Whether it’s growing your email marketing list or selling more products through your eCommerce website, our team brings the dedication and experience for all your digital marketing needs. Our headquarters is located in Arlington, Texas, but our clients can be found nationwide. Our capabilities encompass everything in the web design and digital marketing space, including web design and hosting, SEO, social media, PPC, content writing, email marketing and more.
Leo Burnett is one of the most recognized and well-known advertising agencies in the world for their long history advertising excellence. The agency was known for creating brand mascots like Uncle Ben, the Jolly Green Giant, Tony the Tiger, the Pillsbury Dough-Boy and the Marlboro Man. Today, Leo Burnett is still known as a leaders in advertising with 85 offices, more than 8,000 employees and a member of Publicis. Learn more.
A Houston Digital Marketing agency's job is to work with you to grow your online presence. Want to get more leads from your website? That's what we're all about! Search Engine Optimization is focused on getting your website to come up in search results higher and more often for the keywords that describe your business. Once we get more traffic to your website, we'll also work on making your website better, so that those people are more likely to become leads or customers.
Of course, you'll also want to make sure to check out the history of each term and figure out if it's worth targeting. Some marketers will find a keyword/phrase that isn't consistent, but still cycles back around every so often with an interest spike. It can be helpful to work those into your overall strategy because they come with occasional peaks of interest you can take advantage of later.
If your agency’s numbers are in the green, you’ve likely received a message or two from interested acquirers. Agency buyers will send out inquiries to see how receptive you are to selling your company and get more specific information to assess its value. If you’re sitting on a list of these potential buyers already, make sure you’ve researched each to ensure they’re legitimate. You’ll want to give short, honest answers to each of the questions they ask so they can give an accurate assessment of your company’s worth. And, of course, don’t discuss any sensitive business information until the potential buyer signs a confidentiality agreement.
In an earlier example we considered a case where “inexpensive widgets” had 10 times the search volume of “high quality widgets.” Nevertheless, some widget makers would completely ignore the higher volume term in their keyword strategy because they do not want to be perceived as low price or cheap. In many cases this thinking is shortsighted. If a widget maker captures demand (i.e., attracts traffic) for the “inexpensive” keyword, it has captured a lead – one that can be sold on a high quality product. without the traffic, there are no opportunities to upsell.
Nobody can predict the future, which is why it is vital to remember that your marketing plan should be a living, working document. This is not a style book, a brand handbook or a book on company policy. A marketing plan should be a reference that is used throughout the year, is malleable to a certain extent and is shared with all stakeholders and contributing members of the team. Transparency is important when developing and finalizing the plan. By getting feedback from all departments and being clear on goals, your marketing plan is more likely to be of value and to be seen as a successful tool.
Perhaps the most important factor in successful marketing is the "corporate vision." Surprisingly, it is largely neglected by marketing textbooks, although not by the popular exponents of corporate strategy  — indeed, it was perhaps the main theme of the book by Peters and Waterman, in the form of their "Superordinate Goals." "In Search of Excellence" said: "Nothing drives progress like the imagination. The idea precedes the deed." [7] If the organization in general, and its chief executive in particular, has a strong vision of where its future lies, then there is a good chance that the organization will achieve a strong position in its markets (and attain that future). This will be not least because its strategies will be consistent and will be supported by its staff at all levels. In this context, all of IBM's marketing activities were underpinned by its philosophy of "customer service," a vision originally promoted by the charismatic Watson dynasty. The emphasis at this stage is on obtaining a complete and accurate picture.
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