Hold your guitar correctly. When you are sitting down, there are two main ways to hold your guitar. For a casual playing style, lay the guitar over your dominant leg. On the other hand, the classical method has you set your guitar on your non-dominant leg. In both instances, make sure that the guitar is held close against your body. Holding your guitar properly makes it easier to play and prevents you from becoming fatigued. Play around with both styles and figure out which one is most comfortable for you.[2]
Hopefully, you've found, bought or borrowed a guitar pick. If not, you'll need to buy yourself some. Don't be stingy, go and pick up at least 10 of them — guitar picks are easy to lose (they often don't cost more than 30 or 40 cents each). You can experiment with different shapes and brands, but I highly recommend medium gauge picks to start; ones that aren't too flimsy, or too hard.
Learn the difference between chords and single notes. Chords occur when you play two or more notes on different strings simultaneously to create one unified sound. These are what make up the "rhythm" portion of acoustic music. Single notes are used more for solos and occur when you play a single note at a time. Both are skills that you must become proficient in when learning to play the acoustic guitar.[4]
But than again, JamPlay does have a cool scale library tool (which is great for intermediate-advanced players), the production quality of JamPlay videos is generally higher (the educational value is about the same), and they release more new lessons and mini courses in different genres for intermediate-advanced guitarists, which might make them a better choice if you're an established player.
Justin is a phenomenal teacher and this book is great for anyone starting to learn guitar. The book goes perfectly with his Beginner's course but even on its own is a superb tool for beginners. It has a lot of famous songs arranged using simple chords (pitch-perfect renditions I should add). It's filled with useful tips and suggestion to improve your playing and make the sound more authentic even if you are a beginner. I don't think I have seen a better, more beginner friendly guitar songbook out there. I would highly recommend this to anybody learning guitar. It's a must-have if you are learning using Justin's videos.
'Artist Studies' here are a real highlight of this site. Twenty-nine 'In the Style of...' different artists are taught here, including The Edge, the great Albert King, AC/DC, BB King, Brian May, Eddie Van Halen and so many more. Pick your favourite and learn to play just like them. Includes all the information you could possibly need including set up your amp and guitar. The 'Practice' tab in the experienced lessons includes exercises to practice for the different genres. Again incredibly comprehensive and simple to get around.
I got all involved with Guitar Tricks and bought a full access membership several years ago. Then I spent MUCH more money on “packages” to learn the songs of specific artists (Eagles, Clapton, etc.). Those packages were housed online, but I was supposed to have access forever in return for the rather large sums I was paying. After a few months, I completely got cut off from my packages. They disappeared. No access. I emailed and emailed – no response. I never posted on their chat room, so I couldn’t have said anything that upset them or gave them reason to cut me off. I talked to a lady several times who didn’t help me at all. In fact, she acted like their site is flawless and I must be wrong. No help. I ended up paying them hundreds and getting ripped off. I would warn everyone to proceed with caution.
Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
The neck of the guitar adjoins the "body" of the instrument. The body of the guitar will vary greatly from guitar to guitar. Most acoustic and classical guitars have a hollowed out body, and a "sound hole," designed to project the sound of the guitar. Most electric guitars have a solid body, and thus will not have a sound hole. Electric guitars will instead have "pick-ups" where the soundhole is located. These "pick-ups" are essentially small microphones, which allow the capture the sound of the ringing strings, allowing them to be amplified.
Guitar Center is proud to offer this free intro to guitar class for seniors. Every customer will have the opportunity to learn the anatomy of the guitar, best techniques for strumming and picking, three new chords, and will walk away with a brand new song, in a fun and friendly environment. The Learn to Play: Guitar is a 45 minute group lesson which starts at 10:30 AM, is free, and for seniors. Guitars will be provided, or students may bring their own.

"During meet and greet session, Daniel taught me how to tune my guitar and get me started on the instrument. Prior to signing up with Daniel, I tried to learn from watching online videos and follow a book. I wasted a year by these unorthodox methods of learning. After meeting Daniel on Skype, he gave me the confidence and accurate guidelines on how to to do it right the first time. I am so looking forward to my future lessons with this awesome teacher. He is very methodical in his approach. 🎼"


Saw you with the Pure and Simple Band at The Terrace at Grove Park the evening of Dec. 13. I am wondering if you attended Enterprise Jr College years ago. I was secretary to Tommy Johnson, Dean of Students, from 1977-1993 and am wondering if you were one of our bus drivers. When the band leader introduced the band members, your name stuck in my head.
Today we are going to review, starting with the D and A chords. We'll start with some simple down strums to help develop that muscle memory in our fingering hand. Then, we'll move to some down-up strums as well. By spending more time on the basics now, you'll make much faster progress. Keep that first finger down for both chords, it doesn't need to move.
Next, concentrate on your "fretting hand" (the hand closest to the neck of the guitar, when sitting in proper position). The thumb of your fretting hand should rest behind the neck of the guitar, with your fingers in a slightly curled position, poised above the strings. It is extremely important to keep these fingers curled at the knuckles, except when specifically instructed not to do so.

While there may be a lack of tutor choice compared to others, such as JamPlay, which boasts 89 different instructors, you still get a very experienced guitar teacher in Justin – having performed around the world, playing with original and cover bands, and featuring in guitar media regularly. Due to his popularity he has even been branded ‘One of the most influential guitar teachers in history’ by a major British newspaper.
When my granddaughters were young, Missy worked tirelessly to create lesson plans for my granddaughters in order to keep them interested in music. For example, if my younger granddaughter (3rd grade at the time) was unmotivated to practice in her workbooks at home, Missy would spend part of a lesson just talking with my granddaughter about what music she was currently enjoying. Then Missy would incorporate that music into her lesson plan. As a result, my granddaughter became once again motivated to practice. Missy makes lessons fun while still teaching technique.
Position your fingers on the neck. The dots on the chords represent where you should hold down your fingers on the neck. For instance, an A major is played by holding down the string on the second fret on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th string. An E minor is played by holding down the second fret on the 5th and 4th string. Hold the strings down until they are pressed against the neck of your guitar.[6]
4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.
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