In this post, I’m going to be doing a complete Chordbuddy review. If you don’t know what Chordbuddy is, it’s essentially a beginner’s learning system that allows guitar players to press down a single button to produce a guitar chord instead of playing the chord with your fingers directly on the strings. Now at first, you might be thinking what’s the point of that? If my fingers aren’t making the actual chord shapes how will I ever learn to play additional chords let alone the ones you can play with Chordbuddy?
Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
I love love love these guitars. No gimmicks. They are pure class (but are capable of absolute fury!) :) Think a Telecaster can’t rock? Johnny Greenwood respectfully disagrees. Check out Bonnie Raitt using a Strat to lay down some nasty slide licks. SRV nearly tears the strings off his Strat. Would you prefer something a little funkier? Here’s Prince playing the greatest guitar solo of all time on a Telecaster.
Learning guitar chords is often one of the first things beginner guitarists do. You only need to know a few popular chords in order to be able to play a huge amount of songs. This beginner’s guitar chords article will provide you with the necessary chords you’ll want to learn for both beginner and intermediate players. Before jumping into learning the chords provided in the guitar chords chart below, I wanted to first explain what a guitar chord actually is. What Is a Guitar Chord? As wikipedia defines it, “a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar”. Although a
If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.
Next, concentrate on your "fretting hand" (the hand closest to the neck of the guitar, when sitting in proper position). The thumb of your fretting hand should rest behind the neck of the guitar, with your fingers in a slightly curled position, poised above the strings. It is extremely important to keep these fingers curled at the knuckles, except when specifically instructed not to do so.
The larger choice of lessons on Jamplay is intriguing, but I don’t know. I think I’ll try GT first since it has a longer refund period, and if it doesn’t work out for me, I’ll just get my money back and head on over to jamplay. I mean it’s not like we’re talking about exorbitant amount of $$$ 🙂 I mean the $15 monthly price is like 20 minutes with a live teacher, that’s pretty ridiculous…
Wow, cool video man, uber informative. It’s interesting to see the side by side like this. I haven’t quite decided which site I’m gonna go with, but I’m leaning more towards guitartricks right now. I used to play a bit when I was younger, so I’m basically restarting the guitar, and those quick to the point lessons from guitartricks come off as a nice way of relearning everything I had long forgotten. I also want to learn Beatles songs, and it looks like only gutartricks has those.

The slap technique is most commonly used by bass players. But slapping can also be done on a guitar, typically electric. There are three basic elements to slapping. One is to slap with the thumb of your right hand over the pickups. The second is to slap with multiple fingers of the left hand onto the strings over the fretboard. The third element is to pluck notes using available fingers on the right hand. Using these three elements to make a slap sound, you can combine them in any order to make whatever rhythms you want.

* Finger tapping - Made popular by Eddie Van Halen (listen to Eruption), finger tapping is one of the easiest guitar tricks to learn that will make you sound like you are playing something totally complex even though you are not. To finger tap, use a finger of your guitar picking hand to play notes on the fretboard by pressing notes down then pulling them off to notes of the fretting hand. It's common to use the middle finger for tapping so that you can keep a hold of the guitar pick.
Now, check to see how you did. While still holding down the chord with your fretting hand, play each string (starting with the sixth) one at a time, listening to be sure each note rings out clearly. If not, study your hand to determine why it doesn't. Are you pressing hard enough? Is one of your other fingers touching that string, which is preventing it from sounding properly? These are the most common reasons why a note does not sound. If you're having trouble, read this feature on getting your chords to ring clearly.
You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).
Guitar Gopher....I had walked away from learning guitar with instructor years back, but I had been playing and learning on my own...the sound is there but at times it sucks....we set up practice time with experience players sometimes its above what I know.....so I shy away slowly until I'm outside the building....trying to think what that was all about....but now I've come upon your set of learning the 5 steps to learning guitar...I'll start all over to give a try one more time on your suggestion about playing guitar....thank you for your counseling and giving guidance....you made a great recommendation, thanks for the opinions.
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
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