My original thesis behind my site was (and still is), that I want to create lessons that will make people fall in love with the guitar, and get them motivated to play real songs. I think I’m good at creating high quality lessons that beginners will enjoy and draw enthusiasm from, but the thing is that I am a one man show at TheGuitarLesson.com, and there are only so many lessons I can produce, while Jamplay and Guitartricks are “big” companies, pumping out new content non-stop.
Justin gives hundreds of hours of lessons away for nothing in return, but he runs the site as a full-time gig and works with an honor system. This allows members to donate what they wish, depending on what they can afford and feel they have gained from using the site. There is also an online store – selling songbooks, DVDs, clothing, and accessories – that allows you to contribute to the site financially, in return for something physical.
This class is perfect for beginners who are ready to build their guitar repertoire. You’ll learn the major scale, both vertically and horizontally, as well as open position scales. Barre chords and basic chords in open position will give you a great starting point for the rest of your guitar journey. Once you get down these essentials you’ll be ready to take on any new challenges!
You Don’t Have to Be a Shark is filled with personal anecdotes and life lessons you might have learned in business school (or at least you think you might have). By drawing from my own life experiences, I will teach you how to how to use pure sales techniques to be more successful in every aspect of your life. My philosophy is simple: great salespeople are made, not born, and no one achieves success in life without knowing how to sell. You Don’t Have to Be a Shark will teach you all that and more. Available now! Order your copy today.
I’ve always wanted to play a guitar. My wife bought me a Martin about 6 years ago. I’m a truck dri...ver with very limited time at home for any lessons and practice so that hurt my ability. Saw the Chordbuddy on a YouTube video and after researching it, I decided to purchase one figuring that it was worth a shot at that price. I received it on October 7th and tried it for the first time the next day. Within 15 minutes I was playing Tom Dooley. Within an hour I was playing Head Over Boots by John Pardi which is not in any of the Chordbuddy songbooks. I used an app called Tabs and started looking for songs with the 4 chords G,D,C and Em.

I'm real fussy about stuff I endorse, I will NEVER ever say to y'all that I play something if I'm not using it and honestly dig it. I do not get paid to use anything, but I do get discounted or free stuff sometimes. I don't have any exclusive deals and often use things not listed below, I'm a bit of gear slut and not particularly faithful ;) Check them out, all seriously great tools for making happy sounds in your ears!


The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.
Am Strut Solo 1 is a free guitar lesson that will teach you how to play a blues solo over our original Am Strut jam track. Peter Vogl will show you how to use the Am pentatonic scale in the open position, the A natural minor scale, and some outside notes to create a solo. We’ll use hammer-ons, slides, and our right hand to create a more expressive solo. Specifically, we’ll use the thumb instead of a pick to play the strings and add a plucky and funky vibe. Peter will start by walking you through the theory choices and how to play the solo in detail. Next, we’ll practice the whole solo at a reduced speed with a metronome before advancing to playing along with the track. Sign up for a free 7 day trial and access a PDF of the tabs, a downloadable mp3 jam track, and three more solos over this progression.
Open string harmonics have a nice chime or bell like sound. To play an open string harmonic, lightly rest the tip of your finger on a string just above a fret wire without actually pressing down, then pick the string. It may take a couple of tries at first but when you succeed the harmonic is on mistakable. The easiest frets to sound an open string harmonic are 5,7,12 on every string but every fret has them if you hit it just right. You can also learn how to tune a guitar using harmonics.
Contrary to some other reviewers of this book, I like the book's set-up. New chords are given at the beginning at each stage only. There isn't a section that gives you chord diagrams so it forces you to memorize chord diagrams as you progress through the book rather than rely on convenient chord diagrams above every lyric. It isn't a chord reference book so if you're looking for that, there are plenty of cheap ones on Amazon or even free on the internet.
i like that lessons are small enough to focus on one single thing for each day/lesson. progress is also slower giving you time to learn chords and strumming. I personally spend cca few hours on each day - prolonging 1 day to few days. it's very exciting to see me as total musical anti-talent play first few chords and even songs. Many thanks to instructor
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
×