Now, that we know about the basic parts of a guitar, it's time to get our hands dirty and start learning to play it. Get yourself an armless chair, and take a seat. You should be sitting comfortably, with your back against the back of the chair. Slouching significantly is a no-no; you'll not only end up with a sore back, you'll develop bad habits on the guitar.
Position your fingers on the neck. The dots on the chords represent where you should hold down your fingers on the neck. For instance, an A major is played by holding down the string on the second fret on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th string. An E minor is played by holding down the second fret on the 5th and 4th string. Hold the strings down until they are pressed against the neck of your guitar.[6]
Realistically, to start improving on guitar, you're going to need to set aside a bit of time to practice. Developing a daily routine is a good idea. Plan to spend at least 15 minutes daily practicing all you've learned will really help. At first, your fingers will be sore, but by playing daily, they'll toughen up, and in a short amount of time, they'll stop hurting. The following list should give you an idea of how to spend your practice time:
Instead of spoon feeding you information in a way that you are eternally dependent on your lessons as many do, we want to help you become an independent learner so that you not only continue learning guitar and growing your skills for the rest of your life.. but that you also develop into your own type of guitar player with your own sound and playing style.  The way that we structure each student’s curriculum purposefully helps to encourage perpetual growth and learning so that you will continually become the most awesome musician that you can be, even when you aren’t at your lessons!
It’s important to realize there is a fine line between challenging yourself with music that is slightly above your ability, and frustrating yourself with music you have no logical reason to expect yourself to be able to play just yet. This line is different for each new guitarist. Some may work on basic chords for years, and be happy enough with that. Others may dive neck-deep into some fairy difficult music and thrive on the challenge it provides. Point is, go at your own pace, and don’t ever feel like you need to take on more of a challenge than you are ready for.
The slap technique is most commonly used by bass players. But slapping can also be done on a guitar, typically electric. There are three basic elements to slapping. One is to slap with the thumb of your right hand over the pickups. The second is to slap with multiple fingers of the left hand onto the strings over the fretboard. The third element is to pluck notes using available fingers on the right hand. Using these three elements to make a slap sound, you can combine them in any order to make whatever rhythms you want.

Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).

This is why it’s important to have someone that holds you accountable for prolonging your learning and practicing, regardless of whether it’s a musical instrument, or a sport, or any other after-school matter. Someone to keep you motivated. And if you decide to make your passion a profession, someone to guide you along the way on how to find the right opportunities for paid gigs, or even a full-time career in playing the Guitar.
Hopefully, you've found, bought or borrowed a guitar pick. If not, you'll need to buy yourself some. Don't be stingy, go and pick up at least 10 of them — guitar picks are easy to lose (they often don't cost more than 30 or 40 cents each). You can experiment with different shapes and brands, but I highly recommend medium gauge picks to start; ones that aren't too flimsy, or too hard.
When you play the right note or chord, you will hear it. It will be a pleasant sound, it will be clear and won't have any blocked string sounds (unless it needs to, but you'll get to that later). To play a note or chord correctly, you have to get your fingers in the right position and press as hard as you can on the frets; it will become a habit if you practice enough.
Adding guitar tricks to your playing will spice up your sound. Whether you play Rock, Metal or Jazz, there are some nifty ways you can get some pretty strange noises from your electric or acoustic guitar. From bleeps and blips to thunderous helicopter sounds and animal growls, this article will show how to squeeze those cool sounds from your guitar like a rockstar.

I'm real fussy about stuff I endorse, I will NEVER ever say to y'all that I play something if I'm not using it and honestly dig it. I do not get paid to use anything, but I do get discounted or free stuff sometimes. I don't have any exclusive deals and often use things not listed below, I'm a bit of gear slut and not particularly faithful ;) Check them out, all seriously great tools for making happy sounds in your ears!


Open string harmonics have a nice chime or bell like sound. To play an open string harmonic, lightly rest the tip of your finger on a string just above a fret wire without actually pressing down, then pick the string. It may take a couple of tries at first but when you succeed the harmonic is on mistakable. The easiest frets to sound an open string harmonic are 5,7,12 on every string but every fret has them if you hit it just right. You can also learn how to tune a guitar using harmonics.
Entering into the site and having a good look round reveals that it is almost easier to say who Guitar Tricks is NOT for. And basically that would be anyone who doesn't want to play the guitar. Joking apart, what I wanted to say is that the member area is very easy to understand; even if you're starting learning guitar from scratch you'll find it really easy to use.
At Guitar Center Shreveport, we think that music and Southern hospitality should go hand-in-hand. That's why we strive to be as approachable as we are knowledgeable, so you can feel comfortable coming to us for advice whether you're a beginner or a pro. Speaking of coming to us, we're on Youree drive between 70th and Bert Kouns Industrial, which makes us easy to get to from I-49 or the Inner Loop Expressway to the west and south, or Barksdale in the east.First and foremost at Guitar Center Shreveport, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs to lessons, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Shreveport area music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.

So, don't get too caught up in strums, as the best approach is to start any new song with this basic down strum. Then, hit the strings on the way up as well, the down-up strum while counting "1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and." This way you are making twice the amount of sound with the same hand motion, giving you a little more movement and fuller accompaniment to a vocal line (melody).
It seems like the Chord Buddy has some mixed reviews, some very positive, some very negative. The positive reviews basically state that the device is very useful, especially if you are new to playing guitar. The negative reviews state that the Chord Buddy wouldn’t properly fit on their guitar, and that the device doesn’t actually work because of this.
The ChordBuddy Guitar Learning System is designed to help you learn to make chords as you learn to play guitar.  The ChordBuddy attaches to the neck of electric or acoustic guitars and guides you through learning basic chord fingering positions.  It works in the key of G and makes the G, C, D, and Em chords.  The included instruction book, songbook, DVD, and two-month lesson plan guides you until you learn to make the chords on your own and you’re ready to remove the “training wheels”.  The ChordBuddy Guitar Learning System is $59.99 at Sharper Image.
A full screen option, 15-second rewind function and the option to slow down the video via a button labeled “1x” to the left of the progress bar. The lesson page does a good job of providing you the information you need without feeling overwhelming is distracting. Videos seem to fit into the background of the rest of the page and appear to be very much a part of their surroundings in the app, making for an overall pleasant viewing experience.
AGE CAN’T HINDER YOU – Working off of muscle memory and visual assistance, ChordBuddy is designed for players of every age. In fact, ChordBuddy is well-suited for those looking to play guitar with arthritis, offering a pain-free method of playing your favorite song. Utilizing ChordBuddy also allows you to learn the guitar on your own, eliminating the need for long guitar lessons with an instructor, which can result in prolonged joint pain.
×