So I signed up and personally didn't like the tutorials and navigation of the site so I cancelled my subscription. I did however feel I should leave a review to point out that when I contacted admin the response was always fast and they refunded me as they state they will. Seems like a trustworthy company with fast response times if you contact them, unfortunately it just wasn't for me. Thanks
Similar to not just focusing on learning songs… let’s say that you learn your Am Pentatonic Scale (this is a very commonly used scale in guitar playing) and you practice and practice until you can play it cleanly and quickly. So you show it to your friends. Do they care? Probably not, it’s just a scale.  Instead of letting this happen to you, we will show you how to use this scale (and all of the other things you will learn).  We will make sure that you know how the different scales, chords, theory, rhythms, etc can all be applied to learning your favorite songs quickly, writing your own songs, improvising your own awesome solos on the fly, playing with a band, and much more!

I bet that you’ve even tried other methods to figure it out. Spending hours on YouTube and google searching for some guitar method that will get you to the level you want, just to get bogged down in the TRUCKLOADS of seemingly unrelated material… Getting some friends that play guitar to show you something here and there, learning some songs off of tabs that are sometimes right and sometimes terribly, terribly wrong just to find that you’re stuck playing the same old things without knowing what to do next.

The layout and scope of Guitar Tricks’ content is perfect for those who want to get into a system quickly and start playing guitar as soon as possible. There’s room to grow and the content isn’t all just for beginners. However, the ideal member, those who I’d bet would be most happy with their membership, will be on the beginner’s side of the guitar looking for a time-sensitive way to learn.


Now that you’ve learned how to purchase a guitar, how to play guitar chords, and the basics of playing a guitar, you’ll just need to maintain practice! Use the ChordBuddy device as long as you need to, removing tabs as you progress. You’ll be ready to perform for your family and friends in no time at all. When you see how easy it is to finally practice and play the guitar, you’re not going to want to give up! See how ChordBuddy works, and discover how beginners, teachers, senior citizens, people with arthritis, and those with disabilities can play the guitar. To contact us, click here or call 877-947-2641.
Minutes 60-600. Pick up the guitar everyday for 20 days for 30 minutes or so. You can do this while you do other things like watch TV or chit chat. Get your fingers used to moving around on the fretboard. Start jamming out some John Denver baby. Please do sing along. Eventually try to keep up with tempo of the changes in the actual song. Once you can change your chords on time, focus on improving your “touch” with your right hand. Strum the chords in a way that it adds texture to the recording (if you are playing along with the man himself.)
School of Rock has a finely-tuned preschoolers program called Little Wing that offers all the benefits of our beginner lessons, but is tailored to capture the attention of these young students and set them on a path towards music proficiency. Through playful exploration of rhythm, song structure, and melody kids are introduced to the guitar and other instruments.
The slap technique is most commonly used by bass players. But slapping can also be done on a guitar, typically electric. There are three basic elements to slapping. One is to slap with the thumb of your right hand over the pickups. The second is to slap with multiple fingers of the left hand onto the strings over the fretboard. The third element is to pluck notes using available fingers on the right hand. Using these three elements to make a slap sound, you can combine them in any order to make whatever rhythms you want.
* Detune dive bomb - A.K.A. Poor man's dive bomb. On guitars with non locking string nuts, you can simulate a dive bomb by turning the tuning key of the low E string down while the note is ringing. This trick is great when used on hard tail bridge guitars with no floating tremolos. You'll have to know how to tune a guitar by ear if you intend to use this trick frequently.
Instead of spoon feeding you information in a way that you are eternally dependent on your lessons as many do, we want to help you become an independent learner so that you not only continue learning guitar and growing your skills for the rest of your life.. but that you also develop into your own type of guitar player with your own sound and playing style.  The way that we structure each student’s curriculum purposefully helps to encourage perpetual growth and learning so that you will continually become the most awesome musician that you can be, even when you aren’t at your lessons!

This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
There are many people out there who doubt that they have the ability to play guitar, so let me tell you right away: your hands aren’t too big or too small, you’re not too young or too old, and it doesn’t matter if you want to play electric or acoustic. Everyone has their own challenges, but I’m confident that if you practice and put your mind to it, you can play the guitar.

Guitar Center is proud to offer this free intro to guitar class for seniors. Every customer will have the opportunity to learn the anatomy of the guitar, best techniques for strumming and picking, three new chords, and will walk away with a brand new song, in a fun and friendly environment. The Learn to Play: Guitar is a 45 minute group lesson which starts at 10:30 AM, is free, and for seniors. Guitars will be provided, or students may bring their own.


One thing that many people find when they first start taking online guitar lessons is that they quickly become “addicted” to them. You should expect that this is going to take up several hours most evenings, but it is time that you will certainly enjoy. It can be a lot of fun learning how to play a new instrument, especially when you can see yourself making progress.
"He laid out the lesson very well and I felt as an absolute beginner that was just getting into it, that I learned a lot just in that 45 minutes. He gave detailed notes that I could easily follow while practicing and made sure to explain everything and answer all my questions. He was punctual on time, which I appreciated, and even when he thought he might be running a little late, he texted me to let me know that he might be. Considering his background and the variety of music that he has in his repertoire I really appreciate the style and professionalism that he's going to bring to our lessons. I sought him out specifically over everyone else because of this very fact as that speaks to me, as someone with a music background, of someone that is flexible and willing to not only teach but still learn themselves. I find that invaluable in a teacher and appreciate that."

In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
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