The idea here is to work on your fretting hand dexterity, but you’ll also want to employ good picking technique. When you get good at the most basic version of this exercise you can move it around the fingerboard and practice it at different frets. You can also vary your fingering to make it more challenging, and you can change up your picking pattern.

Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
Minutes 30-60. Practice making the basic 5 shapes. This is probably the hardest part. You gotta put your head down for 30 minutes and remember the chords that are demonstrated below. Once you start getting these shapes down, adding to your portfolio will be easy. You can even experiment with adding and removing fingers– you’ll find a lot of cool sounds here and you’ll continue to discover these for years to come.
Justin gives hundreds of hours of lessons away for nothing in return, but he runs the site as a full-time gig and works with an honor system. This allows members to donate what they wish, depending on what they can afford and feel they have gained from using the site. There is also an online store – selling songbooks, DVDs, clothing, and accessories – that allows you to contribute to the site financially, in return for something physical.
You Don’t Have to Be a Shark is filled with personal anecdotes and life lessons you might have learned in business school (or at least you think you might have). By drawing from my own life experiences, I will teach you how to how to use pure sales techniques to be more successful in every aspect of your life. My philosophy is simple: great salespeople are made, not born, and no one achieves success in life without knowing how to sell. You Don’t Have to Be a Shark will teach you all that and more. Available now! Order your copy today.
Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)

Along with my massive website revamp in 2018, I am remaking and improving many of the modules in this course so don't be surprised if some bits look a little different :) I'm now dividing the 9 stages of the Beginner course into three grades; white (1), yellow (2) and orange (3). As well as the core lessons with practice routines and song suggestions, each grade will have some related lessons on Ear Training, Rhythm Study, Guitar Maintenance, Practical Music Theory to help you understand how music works!
Now, that we know about the basic parts of a guitar, it's time to get our hands dirty and start learning to play it. Get yourself an armless chair, and take a seat. You should be sitting comfortably, with your back against the back of the chair. Slouching significantly is a no-no; you'll not only end up with a sore back, you'll develop bad habits on the guitar.
Secondly, you are going to build up a vocabulary of basic chords. This should include mastering open-form A, C, D, E, F and G Major chords, as well as open-form minors such as Am, Em, Dm and even some easy 7th chords. You should learn to play “power chords” (which actually aren’t chords at all) as well as the most commonly used movable barre shapes such as A, Am, E and Em.
It seems like the Chord Buddy has some mixed reviews, some very positive, some very negative. The positive reviews basically state that the device is very useful, especially if you are new to playing guitar. The negative reviews state that the Chord Buddy wouldn’t properly fit on their guitar, and that the device doesn’t actually work because of this.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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