"He laid out the lesson very well and I felt as an absolute beginner that was just getting into it, that I learned a lot just in that 45 minutes. He gave detailed notes that I could easily follow while practicing and made sure to explain everything and answer all my questions. He was punctual on time, which I appreciated, and even when he thought he might be running a little late, he texted me to let me know that he might be. Considering his background and the variety of music that he has in his repertoire I really appreciate the style and professionalism that he's going to bring to our lessons. I sought him out specifically over everyone else because of this very fact as that speaks to me, as someone with a music background, of someone that is flexible and willing to not only teach but still learn themselves. I find that invaluable in a teacher and appreciate that."
New and used instruments are the biggest share of what we have to offer at Guitar Center Shreveport, but there's more than just that! We're also offer lessons, so if you're looking to take on a new skill or brush up on your existing talents, we can help. Feel free to drop by at the store or give us a call at 318-798-0233 for an in-depth discussion about what we can do to make your musical dreams a reality.
NOTE! We get asked all the time why a guitar educational company with so many advanced courses would offer such a simple solution to learning guitar without having to learn how to read music, learn theory or work through a more "formal" learning methodology. The answer is really simple; you never stop learning music but you do have to start. If your introduction to music is boring, tedious and generally a struggle, you'll likely pack the guitar up in its case and stick it in the closet. If it's fun, engaging and you can prove to yourself that you can really do it, then you'll spend a lifetime enjoying and learning guitar. Hopefully, TrueFire and our massive library of instruction will enhance that lifetime of enjoyment.
Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[8]
Learning guitar is a lot of fun, and with the right lessons anyone can become a great guitar player. However, to be successful it's important to pick the right learning method and stay focused. We designed our Core Learning System to be a step-by-step system that keeps beginners on-track and having fun. Give it a try today by becoming a Full Access member.
Adding guitar tricks to your playing will spice up your sound. Whether you play Rock, Metal or Jazz, there are some nifty ways you can get some pretty strange noises from your electric or acoustic guitar. From bleeps and blips to thunderous helicopter sounds and animal growls, this article will show how to squeeze those cool sounds from your guitar like a rockstar.
I have a nerve problem in my left hand which causes numbness and pain; therefore, I cannot use my fingers on the strings. The Chordbuddy is very helpful for those who have physical hand issues. All I want to do is enjoy playing my guitar at home and don't expect to become an expert. the Chordbuddy has given me back the joy of playing for my own enjoyment.
This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
After teaching guitar and music theory to thousands of students over past three decades, I thought that I had basically 'seen it all' when it comes to guitar instruction. Then I discovered Justin’s website, and man was I impressed! Justin’s caring spirit, attention to detail, vast knowledge base, and especially his lucid, laidback and nurturing style, allow students to fall in love with the learning process. You see, it’s not enough to simply find out how to play a few cool licks or chords. A truly great teacher will make you fall in love with the process of discovery so that you can unlock the best within you. Justin is one of these great teachers, and I highly recommend justinguitar.com to anyone who wants to tap into their best selves.

I have been taking lessons with Justin on line for approximately 1 year. I started out with another teacher on the internet, and wasted one full year with the first guys lessons, I really learned nothing more than the basic chords and I played sloppy because I never learned any technique. Once I stared Justin's lessons, I improved almost immediately. Even if you do take his free online lessons, I highly recommend this book as a supplement. I am on to his Intermediate lesson plan, but I decided to get this book anyways, and I am so glad that I did. I am able to play many of these songs after about 5 minutes of my first attempt.


Start playing the different notes and hold the different shapes. Once you have a basic understanding of how the notes are played throughout the song, you can start to hold each of the chords. If the song consists of chords that you're used to playing, it will make the process easier. If the song uses different chords, it may take some time and adjustment to get used to them. Practice the chords separately if they are unfamiliar to you.[12]
Justin is an instructor with that rare combination that encompasses great playing in conjunction with a thoughtful, likable personality. Justin's instruction is extremely intelligent because he's smart enough to know the 'basics' don't have to be served 'raw' - Justin keenly serves the information covered in chocolate. Justin's site is like a free pass in a candy store!
In the world of piano, if a student is learning a piece of music, there can be several different technical variations so that the student can play the music they want without overwhelming themselves with something that is much too difficult. While some of this exists for modern guitar, it tends to be quite limited unless a student is studying classical guitar.
Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[8]
Guitar Center is proud to offer this free intro to guitar class for kids ages 5 to 13. In this lesson, your child will have the opportunity to learn the anatomy of the guitar, best techniques for strumming and picking, three new chords, and will have learned to play a brand new song, in a fun and friendly environment. The Learn to Play: Guitar is a 45 minute group lesson for your kids, starts at 6:30 PM, is free. Guitars will be provided, or students may bring their own.
Similar to not just focusing on learning songs… let’s say that you learn your Am Pentatonic Scale (this is a very commonly used scale in guitar playing) and you practice and practice until you can play it cleanly and quickly. So you show it to your friends. Do they care? Probably not, it’s just a scale.  Instead of letting this happen to you, we will show you how to use this scale (and all of the other things you will learn).  We will make sure that you know how the different scales, chords, theory, rhythms, etc can all be applied to learning your favorite songs quickly, writing your own songs, improvising your own awesome solos on the fly, playing with a band, and much more!
Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.

For the most part, all great guitar players need to have the same tools of technique and knowledge at their disposal, however, guitar players of different styles will use these tools in very different ways. So if you’re goal is to be able to write your own songs, we’ll show you how the things that you’re learning can be used in songwriting, or if you’re more of a guitar solo person, we’ll show you how to use everything to melt people’s faces with amazing guitar solos.  It isn’t enough for you to just learn things, so we will make sure that you can see how everything that you learn is going to help you with your specific goals!


Play the song with the audio recording. Once you've mastered the individual portions of the song, you're ready to play the song in its entirety. Play the song and strum your guitar along with the song. Try to keep up with the tempo of the song you're covering. Follow the tabs as you play. If you mess up, follow the music on the tabs and come back into the song when you're ready. Once you've become proficient at playing the riff, continue practicing until you don't need the tabs anymore.

Strum your guitar with a pick or your fingers. Hold down the strings with your fingers in the appropriate shape and try to strum with your other hand. Acoustic guitar strings often have higher actions than electric guitars, so you may have to press down very hard to get a good sound. If the chord comes out muted, try holding down the strings with more force. If your string is buzzing, move your finger further away from the metal fret on your neck.[7]
Most recently, Perry was invited to appear on “Beyond the Tank,” the ABC show featuring the shark investors’ most successful protégés. During the May 15 episode, Perry introduced his new creation, MathBuddy, an educational system that uses music to teach math equations to children. Although he hopes to promote it to schools across Alabama, Perry said the system is in the early stages of development.
Incredibly in-depth review of GuitarTricks. I’ve been playing for over 30 years, self-taught, and I’ve always considered giving this a try in order to improve my skills and playing, and possibly break some bad habits I know I have developed over the years. I also have a few lessons from GuitarJamz that I got on special, but have not dug into those yet. Anyway, great review and I love your site.
I’ve always wanted to play a guitar. My wife bought me a Martin about 6 years ago. I’m a truck dri...ver with very limited time at home for any lessons and practice so that hurt my ability. Saw the Chordbuddy on a YouTube video and after researching it, I decided to purchase one figuring that it was worth a shot at that price. I received it on October 7th and tried it for the first time the next day. Within 15 minutes I was playing Tom Dooley. Within an hour I was playing Head Over Boots by John Pardi which is not in any of the Chordbuddy songbooks. I used an app called Tabs and started looking for songs with the 4 chords G,D,C and Em.

We now know three chords: G major, C major, and D major. Let's see if we can put them to use in a song. At first, switching chords will take far too long to be able to play any songs properly. Don't give up, though! With a bit of practice, you'll be playing away, sounding great (this tutorial on switching chords quickly might also be of some help). In our next lesson, we'll start learning about strumming, so you can come back to these songs, and be able to play them better.


Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
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