The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.
Throughout the Beginner Guitar Quick-Start Series, we’ll include the most important things you need to know be successful at playing guitar right away. First we’ll cover basics like how to tune your guitar, how to hold your guitar, and the parts of the guitar. After that, we’ll get into technique, how to strum, how to make your first chords, and how to play your first song.
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
Arpeggios are just chords, but how they are played is a special technique unto itself. The left hand playing single notes and the right hand strumming a chord is such a great technique builder. I can’t express enough how important it is to work on these. Combining technical and musical efforts in a logical progression is without a doubt the best way to become a great guitarist.

Tapping is a technique where the right hand taps a string and alternates with notes played by the left hand. A basic way you can start tapping is to find three notes that you want to play on one string and play them as triplets using this sequence: tap, pull-off, pull-off. The first note is tapped with your index or middle finger and then pulls-off onto a note held by one of the left hand fingers, which is then pulled-off onto another note held by a left hand finger. Other ways to tap are to use more right hand fingers, use open strings, and to use different rhythms.
Guitar Tricks is an online guitar course designed to teach the guitar, and so much more besides. Actually, they invented the concept of online guitar lessons back in 1998, even before Youtube existed! It is right up there in the top sites for learning guitar, may even be the best. Personal preference may ultimately dictate which of the sites you prefer, but definitely, we are talking of top-notch quality lessons.
So, don't get too caught up in strums, as the best approach is to start any new song with this basic down strum. Then, hit the strings on the way up as well, the down-up strum while counting "1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and." This way you are making twice the amount of sound with the same hand motion, giving you a little more movement and fuller accompaniment to a vocal line (melody).
Guitar Tricks is an online guitar course designed to teach the guitar, and so much more besides. Actually, they invented the concept of online guitar lessons back in 1998, even before Youtube existed! It is right up there in the top sites for learning guitar, may even be the best. Personal preference may ultimately dictate which of the sites you prefer, but definitely, we are talking of top-notch quality lessons.
This course is completely free, but please consider making a donation or buying some my products in the official store if you dig it - your support enables me to keep expanding and improving the courses for everyone! My Practical Music Theory Course is also great for those that really want to understand what they're doing - the early grades are free to check out too!
* Finger tapping - Made popular by Eddie Van Halen (listen to Eruption), finger tapping is one of the easiest guitar tricks to learn that will make you sound like you are playing something totally complex even though you are not. To finger tap, use a finger of your guitar picking hand to play notes on the fretboard by pressing notes down then pulling them off to notes of the fretting hand. It's common to use the middle finger for tapping so that you can keep a hold of the guitar pick.

So impressed was I, that I have broken the list down for you to see the numbers per genre. As you can see some genres are more sparse than others but it does make for a fantastic library of songs, music and tuition. (And if a favourite song of yours is missing you can always go on the forum and request that they try to add it, baring in mind with all the legal requirements it takes at least six months to add!)


Our highly-trained professional instructors teach guitar lessons to beginners starting with the fundamentals, including scales, chords, tuning, arpeggios and rhythm. They then use famous rock songs to help guide guitar students through the early stages of musical development. Our beginner guitar lessons inspire creativity and help develop new students into world-class players with weekly private guitar lessons and group rehearsals. School of Rock's core philosophy is that the best way for students to gain musical proficiency is through performance-based music education. All of our lessons for guitar students include a performance aspect.
The slap technique is most commonly used by bass players. But slapping can also be done on a guitar, typically electric. There are three basic elements to slapping. One is to slap with the thumb of your right hand over the pickups. The second is to slap with multiple fingers of the left hand onto the strings over the fretboard. The third element is to pluck notes using available fingers on the right hand. Using these three elements to make a slap sound, you can combine them in any order to make whatever rhythms you want.
Learning guitar is a lot of fun, and with the right lessons anyone can become a great guitar player. However, to be successful it's important to pick the right learning method and stay focused. We designed our Core Learning System to be a step-by-step system that keeps beginners on-track and having fun. Give it a try today by becoming a Full Access member.

I bet that you’ve even tried other methods to figure it out. Spending hours on YouTube and google searching for some guitar method that will get you to the level you want, just to get bogged down in the TRUCKLOADS of seemingly unrelated material… Getting some friends that play guitar to show you something here and there, learning some songs off of tabs that are sometimes right and sometimes terribly, terribly wrong just to find that you’re stuck playing the same old things without knowing what to do next.
"During meet and greet session, Daniel taught me how to tune my guitar and get me started on the instrument. Prior to signing up with Daniel, I tried to learn from watching online videos and follow a book. I wasted a year by these unorthodox methods of learning. After meeting Daniel on Skype, he gave me the confidence and accurate guidelines on how to to do it right the first time. I am so looking forward to my future lessons with this awesome teacher. He is very methodical in his approach. 🎼"
The acoustic guitar is one of the most popular instruments around. It’s versatile, low maintenance and sounds great. You don’t need to lug around an amp if you’re just playing for a few friends and it provides enough volume to accompany vocals but not so much that it overshadows them. I personally love playing acoustic guitar. Everything from the sound to the feel of playing a nice acoustic is satisfying. What’s even more satisfying is learning how to play some great acoustic guitar songs. There are so many amazing acoustic guitar songs out there that it’s hard to narrow down

After teaching guitar and music theory to thousands of students over past three decades, I thought that I had basically 'seen it all' when it comes to guitar instruction. Then I discovered Justin’s website, and man was I impressed! Justin’s caring spirit, attention to detail, vast knowledge base, and especially his lucid, laidback and nurturing style, allow students to fall in love with the learning process. You see, it’s not enough to simply find out how to play a few cool licks or chords. A truly great teacher will make you fall in love with the process of discovery so that you can unlock the best within you. Justin is one of these great teachers, and I highly recommend justinguitar.com to anyone who wants to tap into their best selves.


The lessons are organized and categorized in several different ways, which is a must, given the number of lessons available. You can search according to skill level (absolute beginner, beginner, easy, intermediate, advanced and extreme), which saves a lot of time because you don’t have to search through lessons that are too easy, too hard, or just not your thing.
When people learn to play a band instrument or the piano, there are almost always professional instructors involved. However, when it comes to the guitar, many of the people who learn to play the guitar learn to play by ear, which is essentially amounts to playing their favorite songs over and over again until they get it right (or at least close). 

Learning guitar is a lot easier when you have a step-by-step system to follow. Guitar Tricks lessons are interconnected and organized to get slightly harder as you progress. You watch a video lesson, play along, and then click a “Next” button to go to the next lesson. Lessons have multiple camera angles, guitar tabs, jam tracks and everything else you need to learn.
Justin Sandercoe has thought long and hard about how to teach people to play the guitar, and how to do this over the internet. He has come up with a well-designed series of courses that will take you from nowhere to proficiency. I tried to learn how to play years ago, using books, and got nowhere. I've been using Justin's site for just over a year and I feel I've made real progress. What's more, Justin offers his lessons for free - a boon for any young player who has the urge to play, but whose pockets are empty. I've seen and used other sites for learners: none of them offer as clearly marked a road as Justin does.
The web has a vast number of resources available for learning how to play guitar. You can learn how to play fancy scales, play songs, learn to solo, and much more. The trouble is, there just aren't many good guitar lessons available to someone looking to start playing guitar. These guitar lessons are designed for people who own (or have borrowed) a guitar, but don't yet know the first thing about playing it.
Though this decision can be based on preference, we think the best guitar for a beginner is the acoustic guitar. Classical guitars have a wider neck, which can be hard for younger students or physically smaller individuals to handle when learning guitar chords. Meanwhile, the electric guitar is designed to be played with an amplifier, which comes at an additional cost. Acoustic guitars are simple and require little to no additional equipment, making them ideal for beginner guitarists.
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