When I first came across this product, that’s what I thought as well. However, as I started to learn more about the product it changed my mind. One of the biggest reasons I’ve seen beginner guitar players give up on trying to learn how to play guitar has been because they just weren’t seeing results fast enough. Pressing down the strings hurts their fingers, resulting in them not being able to press down hard enough to produce a clear sounding chord. Some have the determination to practice and overcome this, while others might not have the same motivation.
Entering into the site and having a good look round reveals that it is almost easier to say who Guitar Tricks is NOT for. And basically that would be anyone who doesn't want to play the guitar. Joking apart, what I wanted to say is that the member area is very easy to understand; even if you're starting learning guitar from scratch you'll find it really easy to use.
I initially bought a few books just to contribute to Justins generous cause, but didn't really think they would be needed as all this is online after all right?... but no, they have actually really helped further my skills along much faster. Just having the song book available when you get the time to play helps a lot (get the ring bound one if you can)
3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
Sound familiar? I know what that’s like… I’ve been there, and I’ve had several students that have been there. Playing the same licks, the same riffs, the same songs on your guitar over and over and over again just gets old so fast.  You’re willing to put in the work, you’re willing to practice hard, BUT WHAT SHOULD YOU PRACTICE?? HOW CAN I LEARN TO BE CREATIVE? IF ONLY I COULD PLAY THAT ONE SOLO!
I love love love these guitars. No gimmicks. They are pure class (but are capable of absolute fury!) :) Think a Telecaster can’t rock? Johnny Greenwood respectfully disagrees. Check out Bonnie Raitt using a Strat to lay down some nasty slide licks. SRV nearly tears the strings off his Strat. Would you prefer something a little funkier? Here’s Prince playing the greatest guitar solo of all time on a Telecaster.
Tony started playing guitar at the age of 14. At age 18 he relocated to Minneapolis, Minnesota to attend Music Tech of Minneapolis. Through the years he has played throughout the upper midwest and most currently in the Ark-La-Tex area, With his band, SUPERUNKNOWN. Tony teaches all styles of Rock, Metal, Blues, Progressive, Latin Rock and Classical.
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:
Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)
While the average viewership of six million may watch the show for the entertainment, it also provides a weekly education on how to successfully sell your product to high-profile prospects. And believe it or not, we can take away a lot of sales lessons from those success stories. Below I’ve identified the top 5 most successful Shark Tank businesses and what we can learn from them.
Through School of Rock's private guitar lessons and group rehearsals, children learn to play the guitar and eventually perform the songs they love in a fun, supportive and comfortable atmosphere. Based on the student's age and skill level, guitar lessons for kids are part of every School of Rock music program including Rookies, Rock 101, Performance, House Band, and AllStars.
Contrary to some other reviewers of this book, I like the book's set-up. New chords are given at the beginning at each stage only. There isn't a section that gives you chord diagrams so it forces you to memorize chord diagrams as you progress through the book rather than rely on convenient chord diagrams above every lyric. It isn't a chord reference book so if you're looking for that, there are plenty of cheap ones on Amazon or even free on the internet.

3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
Saw you with the Pure and Simple Band at The Terrace at Grove Park the evening of Dec. 13. I am wondering if you attended Enterprise Jr College years ago. I was secretary to Tommy Johnson, Dean of Students, from 1977-1993 and am wondering if you were one of our bus drivers. When the band leader introduced the band members, your name stuck in my head.
The neck of the guitar adjoins the "body" of the instrument. The body of the guitar will vary greatly from guitar to guitar. Most acoustic and classical guitars have a hollowed out body, and a "sound hole," designed to project the sound of the guitar. Most electric guitars have a solid body, and thus will not have a sound hole. Electric guitars will instead have "pick-ups" where the soundhole is located. These "pick-ups" are essentially small microphones, which allow the capture the sound of the ringing strings, allowing them to be amplified.
It’s actually very easy: Play an open sixth string note, followed by the first fret of the sixth string with your first (pointer) finger. Then play the second fret on the same string with your second finger. Then the third with your third (ring) finger, and finally you play the fourth fret on the sixth string with your fourth (pinky) finger. Incidentally, this movement up the neck of one fret a time (or half-step) is called the Chromatic Scale, which is where this exercise gets its name.
Acoustic: I recommend a Yamaha solid top acoustic guitar. This guitar plays just as good as some that are many hundreds of dollars more expensive. It can be difficult to manufacture quality acoustics at low prices due to the importance of a solid top finish. When I was in college I scratched together the cash to buy a handmade acoustic guitar that was over $1,000 (I won’t mention the brand) but that guitar was nowhere near as good as this Yamaha.
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