By now, you’ve already decided whether to stick with the Guitar or to drop it. If you’re one of the lucky few that stuck with it, in spite of having an extremely busy schedule with work and family obligations, congratulations. Contrary to popular belief, taking the time out for routine Guitar practice has tremendous benefits, even for the busiest of people.

So impressed was I, that I have broken the list down for you to see the numbers per genre. As you can see some genres are more sparse than others but it does make for a fantastic library of songs, music and tuition. (And if a favourite song of yours is missing you can always go on the forum and request that they try to add it, baring in mind with all the legal requirements it takes at least six months to add!)


Hi there, that’s a good question, I had to go into my accounts on jamplay and guitartricks to look around for you. It looks to me like Jamplay has more fingerstyle lessons, they even have dedicated courses on various subgenres of fingerstyle guitar. So if you are at an intermediate level already, and want start “mastering” fingerstyle guitar, I would recommend Jamplay. If you’re still a beginner, than it would be best if you reach an intermediate level first on Guitartricks, so you are well rounded in everything guitar. I always recommend that specializing towards any given genre should come after you have a solid knowledge of the basics, and are comfortable with anything they throw at you 🙂
For those wanting to learn the guitar, the ChordBuddy is helpful because it works on building up the strength and finger skills on the left hand, while also working on the right hand rhythm. As you progress with our system and gain more confidence, you begin to start playing without the aid of the ChordBuddy. Many people quite before getting here, but the ChordBuddy help people stick with it.

In other words, all of the guitar gods throughout music history played an instrument essentially like the one you own. It’s not like they have some kind of advantage, aside from their talent and experience. The same notes and chords they play are available on your guitar, and while it may take a lot of hard work on your part, you can play them too if you want to.
My business was created because of one of the most powerful forces in the universe–love. My daughter desperately wanted to play guitar like her daddy. Like most new guitar students, she was having trouble learning to play. It pained her to quit but she was frustrated and was going to give up. My daughter came to me and said, “Daddy, can’t you do anything to help me play guitar?” I invented the ChordBuddy because I love my daughter and now, she plays and teaches guitar just like her daddy.
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:
The teen and tween years are the make or break years for most people, in deciding whether they’re going to stick with a childhood hobby or interest, for life. As you go through puberty, and begin preparing for life as an adult, and responsibilities pile on your plate, the first things to go tend to be the personal interests you’re passionate about, because they don’t pay the bills. Also, because they’re not an official part of your school curriculum. In other words, what was once a must-have becomes a nice-to-have.
My granddaughters took voice, guitar, and piano from Missy from the age of third grade through high school. I selected Missy due to her experience: classically trained on piano and voice during her formative years, studied at Berklee College of Music, Boston, toured the country as a solo singer/songwriter, and played world-famous and iconic venues, including the late CBGBs in New York City and the Bluebird in Nashville. You can find her on iTunes, and one of her students, Paul Thomas Mitchell (a.k.a. Tommy Mitchell) was on the hit television show, America's Got Talent.
The quality of a few older lessons are subpar, they should just remove those or reshoot them. For example, there is a teacher called Hanspeter Kruesi, who seems like a nice guy, presents useful content, but the 360p lessons shot YouTube style at his house in front of his PC don't live up to my expectations. I'm just talking about a few lessons here, but still.

I got all involved with Guitar Tricks and bought a full access membership several years ago. Then I spent MUCH more money on “packages” to learn the songs of specific artists (Eagles, Clapton, etc.). Those packages were housed online, but I was supposed to have access forever in return for the rather large sums I was paying. After a few months, I completely got cut off from my packages. They disappeared. No access. I emailed and emailed – no response. I never posted on their chat room, so I couldn’t have said anything that upset them or gave them reason to cut me off. I talked to a lady several times who didn’t help me at all. In fact, she acted like their site is flawless and I must be wrong. No help. I ended up paying them hundreds and getting ripped off. I would warn everyone to proceed with caution.
Brian May on justinguitar.com! Brian May (www.brianmay.com) on his blog, Brian May's Soapbox. "On a day when there's a temptation to go into a dark place, and only see all the bad stuff there is in the world ... greed, cruelty, exploitation, selfishness ... I get days like that pretty often .... it's great to find someone giving out, and giving out good, and operating on an honour basis ... There are so many people who can't afford Guitar lessons .... well, here's a wonderful guy who has set up a whole system of teaching guitar ... Blues, Jazz, Rock, even Songwriting, from the basics, tuning the guitar, etc ... upwards ... If you use his site, it's up to you to determine how much you can contribute ... but this is an amazing site .... he is also very aware of issues in the world which need attention ... a great channel .. Check him out. He's a giver."
Hi there, thanks for the kind words. The beginner’s guide I created is thorough, nothing is held back. The advantage Jamplay and Guitartricks have is that they are absolutely huge sites, with loads more lessons than I will ever be able to publish on my own site. This starts becoming important when you get to an intermediate level, and need more variety. But at first, my free beginner’s guitar guide is enough indeed.

So anyhow, both GuitarTricks and JamPlay are great sites, it all comes down to you, the student. If you are diligent and dedicate enough time and practice to it, you’ll succeed either way. The reason I recommend GuitarTricks to beginners is because it gives them one less chance to sidestep and wonder around looking at other teacher’s lessons when things get a bit harder. That’s what a lot of people do on my site.
Since the website was born back in 1998, the quality of the lessons vary. The older lessons don’t have that good video and sound quality, but we only experienced this on about 1-3% of all of the lessons during our review, the rest are in HD. Each lesson has reference material, such as tabs and chord charts, which can all be downloaded in pdf format for easy printing.
Each song is very well laid out and easy to understand, especially for beginners. It is recommended to play these songs along with a metronome so that you can also practice your tempo and rhythm as you begin playing guitar. Alternatively, if you don’t know how the song goes, you can also play the original song in the background as you play along with it.

Download apps that will help you learn how to play. There are apps that you can download to your mobile device that will help you learn how to play the acoustic guitar. These apps range from step-to-step guides on how to play, to apps that can act as mixers and recorders. Go to the app store for your device and try to find some apps that can help you.

One thing that many people find when they first start taking online guitar lessons is that they quickly become “addicted” to them. You should expect that this is going to take up several hours most evenings, but it is time that you will certainly enjoy. It can be a lot of fun learning how to play a new instrument, especially when you can see yourself making progress.


There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe.
This is not a substitute for learning scales. At some point down the road you are going to want to dive into music theory at least a little bit, if nothing else so you can understand how scales work and how chords are built. For now you are a beginner, and this exercise can go a long way toward loosening up your fretting hand and improving your technique.
ANYBODY, OF EVERY ABILITY, CAN PLAY – Designed for every type of learner, ChordBuddy includes modifications that allow individuals of every ability to successfully learn a new instrument. Perfect for use in the music therapy, home, or school setting, ChordBuddy can help individuals learn to play the guitar flat or with two people at a time, making for what is an all-around therapeutic experience.
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