When my granddaughters were young, Missy worked tirelessly to create lesson plans for my granddaughters in order to keep them interested in music. For example, if my younger granddaughter (3rd grade at the time) was unmotivated to practice in her workbooks at home, Missy would spend part of a lesson just talking with my granddaughter about what music she was currently enjoying. Then Missy would incorporate that music into her lesson plan. As a result, my granddaughter became once again motivated to practice. Missy makes lessons fun while still teaching technique.

I decided to try to learn how to play the guitar so I could sing and play with my preschool class. I was getting very frustrated because my fingers would not do what I want them to do. I put the chord buddy on my guitar and could play a dozen songs the first night. Just wish they made more of these in different keys so I did not have to re-key the songs I want to be able to play. It will take some practice because you do have to press down on the tabs very hard to get a clear not so need to build up some more strength in my left hand so the strings don't twang.


There is no way to mark or loop song sub-sections, so it is hunt and guess tryin to find the section you want to repeat without wasting time listening to the irrelevant taking and or parts you already know again and again . The theory may be interesting , but should come in separate sections, NOT in the middle of trying to learn to play a part of the song. Songs should be broken down into smaller sections for learning , or have ability to mark and loop sub-sections so you can repeat as needed.
There’s plenty of people with small hands who play the guitar. Nine times out of ten smaller people confuse the terrible awkwardness that comes with the first week of playing the guitar and mistakenly think it’s because their hands are small. Again, you’re teaching your hands to do really strange movements here. Imagine going to an advanced yoga class having never stretched before, that’s basically what you’re doing.
The web has a vast number of resources available for learning how to play guitar. You can learn how to play fancy scales, play songs, learn to solo, and much more. The trouble is, there just aren't many good guitar lessons available to someone looking to start playing guitar. These guitar lessons are designed for people who own (or have borrowed) a guitar, but don't yet know the first thing about playing it.

There’s only one thing I would comment on, and that is GF1 and 2 is lead by the same person, and the only songs you’re going to be playing are what I’d term as country love songs. If you’re ok with that, then you’re all set. If (like me) this sort of music grates on you, you’re going to find 1&2 very hard, and like me you’ll need to find some other way of practicing the lessons.


Instead of spoon feeding you information in a way that you are eternally dependent on your lessons as many do, we want to help you become an independent learner so that you not only continue learning guitar and growing your skills for the rest of your life.. but that you also develop into your own type of guitar player with your own sound and playing style.  The way that we structure each student’s curriculum purposefully helps to encourage perpetual growth and learning so that you will continually become the most awesome musician that you can be, even when you aren’t at your lessons!
Learn how to transition to different chords. One way to become proficient quickly is to learn how to transition between the various chords quickly. These transition periods are often the hardest for beginners to play when they are starting off. The more you practice between switching to different chords, however, the better you'll get at doing it in songs. Practice switching between open chords like G, A, E, and C. [14]
The lessons are organized and categorized in several different ways, which is a must, given the number of lessons available. You can search according to skill level (absolute beginner, beginner, easy, intermediate, advanced and extreme), which saves a lot of time because you don’t have to search through lessons that are too easy, too hard, or just not your thing.

Learn how to transition to different chords. One way to become proficient quickly is to learn how to transition between the various chords quickly. These transition periods are often the hardest for beginners to play when they are starting off. The more you practice between switching to different chords, however, the better you'll get at doing it in songs. Practice switching between open chords like G, A, E, and C. [14]
We believe that Guitar practice as an adult is more productive than it seems because it clears your head, it builds patience, discipline and concentration skills which you can transfer over to other parts of life, and it keeps your hand-eye coordination sharp. It also keeps you committed to learning and improvement, which again, are transferable traits to professional life. As role models, parents taking active classes shows kids the importance of pursuing personal interests for life.
Practice playing individual notes. Holding down a string and producing a decent sound can sometimes be more challenging than it looks. If you don't hold down a string hard enough, you'll get a muted note and if you hold down the string too close to the fret your guitar will buzz. Practice picking in an up and down motion on your string with the other hand. Continue doing this until you feel comfortable moving up or down the neck to a different note. Practice playing the notes back and forth until you become comfortable strumming.
Justin Sandercoe has thought long and hard about how to teach people to play the guitar, and how to do this over the internet. He has come up with a well-designed series of courses that will take you from nowhere to proficiency. I tried to learn how to play years ago, using books, and got nowhere. I've been using Justin's site for just over a year and I feel I've made real progress. What's more, Justin offers his lessons for free - a boon for any young player who has the urge to play, but whose pockets are empty. I've seen and used other sites for learners: none of them offer as clearly marked a road as Justin does.

Beginner to advanced, acoustic to electric, blues to country... we have the guitar lessons you need to move your playing forward. We consistently film, edit and publish around 11 hours of new guitar lessons every 30 days; an enormous amount of material to keep your playing focused and interests piqued. With new lessons added on a daily basis, you cannot find another company as dedicated to teaching you how to play guitar as JamPlay.
"Our son loves his guitar lessons and wants to play. He's the real deal with his own gigs and he teaches using music we love. Garrick gets 5 stars because he unexpectedly requested to join us when we purchased our guitar, picked an appropriate used(!) one with metal strings and had it modified to bring the frets in closer for small fingers. His lessons feel customized. We recommend Garrick!"

Now, that we know about the basic parts of a guitar, it's time to get our hands dirty and start learning to play it. Get yourself an armless chair, and take a seat. You should be sitting comfortably, with your back against the back of the chair. Slouching significantly is a no-no; you'll not only end up with a sore back, you'll develop bad habits on the guitar.
Hi there, thanks for the kind words. The beginner’s guide I created is thorough, nothing is held back. The advantage Jamplay and Guitartricks have is that they are absolutely huge sites, with loads more lessons than I will ever be able to publish on my own site. This starts becoming important when you get to an intermediate level, and need more variety. But at first, my free beginner’s guitar guide is enough indeed.

Practice at least 20 minutes 6 days a week. Consistent practice will allow you to improve your guitar playing skills over a short period. Taking long breaks and not staying dedicated will wear away your muscle memory and delay the development of your skills. Instead, dedicate 20 minutes to an hour of practice throughout most of the week. During practice, you can either run different drills or you can try covering a song.[15]
By now, you’ve already decided whether to stick with the Guitar or to drop it. If you’re one of the lucky few that stuck with it, in spite of having an extremely busy schedule with work and family obligations, congratulations. Contrary to popular belief, taking the time out for routine Guitar practice has tremendous benefits, even for the busiest of people.

"My wife found Chris online for guitar lessons for our 7 year old. After just a few weeks, my 7 year old was doing really cool things with his new guitar. Chris sent us printouts of the weekly lessons so my son could practice during the week. And now I've been learning the lessons too. Any teacher who can keep my son's attention for a full half hour (sometimes he even goes over) AND actually teach him something too is a great teacher!"
Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.

There is no way to mark or loop song sub-sections, so it is hunt and guess tryin to find the section you want to repeat without wasting time listening to the irrelevant taking and or parts you already know again and again . The theory may be interesting , but should come in separate sections, NOT in the middle of trying to learn to play a part of the song. Songs should be broken down into smaller sections for learning , or have ability to mark and loop sub-sections so you can repeat as needed.
Surprisingly, for a free site, Justin Guitar offers a few free tools and apps to help guitarists with their lessons. The most interesting of these are the series of apps available for download on the iTunes store (so they will only work with iOS). These include a Time Trainer Metronome, a Guitar Note Trainer, and a Blues Lick app – which brings together Justin’s weekly Blues Lick series.

When you play the right note or chord, you will hear it. It will be a pleasant sound, it will be clear and won't have any blocked string sounds (unless it needs to, but you'll get to that later). To play a note or chord correctly, you have to get your fingers in the right position and press as hard as you can on the frets; it will become a habit if you practice enough.
For the most part, all great guitar players need to have the same tools of technique and knowledge at their disposal, however, guitar players of different styles will use these tools in very different ways. So if you’re goal is to be able to write your own songs, we’ll show you how the things that you’re learning can be used in songwriting, or if you’re more of a guitar solo person, we’ll show you how to use everything to melt people’s faces with amazing guitar solos.  It isn’t enough for you to just learn things, so we will make sure that you can see how everything that you learn is going to help you with your specific goals!
I have been taking lessons with Justin on line for approximately 1 year. I started out with another teacher on the internet, and wasted one full year with the first guys lessons, I really learned nothing more than the basic chords and I played sloppy because I never learned any technique. Once I stared Justin's lessons, I improved almost immediately. Even if you do take his free online lessons, I highly recommend this book as a supplement. I am on to his Intermediate lesson plan, but I decided to get this book anyways, and I am so glad that I did. I am able to play many of these songs after about 5 minutes of my first attempt.
Justin Sandercoe has thought long and hard about how to teach people to play the guitar, and how to do this over the internet. He has come up with a well-designed series of courses that will take you from nowhere to proficiency. I tried to learn how to play years ago, using books, and got nowhere. I've been using Justin's site for just over a year and I feel I've made real progress. What's more, Justin offers his lessons for free - a boon for any young player who has the urge to play, but whose pockets are empty. I've seen and used other sites for learners: none of them offer as clearly marked a road as Justin does.
Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.
I love love love these guitars. No gimmicks. They are pure class (but are capable of absolute fury!) :) Think a Telecaster can’t rock? Johnny Greenwood respectfully disagrees. Check out Bonnie Raitt using a Strat to lay down some nasty slide licks. SRV nearly tears the strings off his Strat. Would you prefer something a little funkier? Here’s Prince playing the greatest guitar solo of all time on a Telecaster.
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