Hi there, that’s a good question, I had to go into my accounts on jamplay and guitartricks to look around for you. It looks to me like Jamplay has more fingerstyle lessons, they even have dedicated courses on various subgenres of fingerstyle guitar. So if you are at an intermediate level already, and want start “mastering” fingerstyle guitar, I would recommend Jamplay. If you’re still a beginner, than it would be best if you reach an intermediate level first on Guitartricks, so you are well rounded in everything guitar. I always recommend that specializing towards any given genre should come after you have a solid knowledge of the basics, and are comfortable with anything they throw at you 🙂

@John Dyhouse: The thing about the chord buddy that is unique is that you can teach yourself quickly. yes you will need to build up your finger pad but you will need to do that anyway without the chord buddy. The main purpose of it is to teach you hand placement, sound, and rythmn first. Then after you have mastered that you can move on to learning more on the topic you are discussing.
In this post, I’m going to be doing a complete Chordbuddy review. If you don’t know what Chordbuddy is, it’s essentially a beginner’s learning system that allows guitar players to press down a single button to produce a guitar chord instead of playing the chord with your fingers directly on the strings. Now at first, you might be thinking what’s the point of that? If my fingers aren’t making the actual chord shapes how will I ever learn to play additional chords let alone the ones you can play with Chordbuddy?

The web has a vast number of resources available for learning how to play guitar. You can learn how to play fancy scales, play songs, learn to solo, and much more. The trouble is, there just aren't many good guitar lessons available to someone looking to start playing guitar. These guitar lessons are designed for people who own (or have borrowed) a guitar, but don't yet know the first thing about playing it.
Since the website was born back in 1998, the quality of the lessons vary. The older lessons don’t have that good video and sound quality, but we only experienced this on about 1-3% of all of the lessons during our review, the rest are in HD. Each lesson has reference material, such as tabs and chord charts, which can all be downloaded in pdf format for easy printing.
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Download apps that will help you learn how to play. There are apps that you can download to your mobile device that will help you learn how to play the acoustic guitar. These apps range from step-to-step guides on how to play, to apps that can act as mixers and recorders. Go to the app store for your device and try to find some apps that can help you.
This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
Learn the difference between chords and single notes. Chords occur when you play two or more notes on different strings simultaneously to create one unified sound. These are what make up the "rhythm" portion of acoustic music. Single notes are used more for solos and occur when you play a single note at a time. Both are skills that you must become proficient in when learning to play the acoustic guitar.[4]
* Visualization - Learn faster by using visualization techniques. In other words, see yourself / imagine yourself doing what you want to be able to do. Try to recreate the images of you completing a recent guitar lesson you have had or a guitar related task in your mind as clearly as possible. Visualization is proven to increase the time it takes to learn a subject because it tricks your brain into thinking it already knows how to do things.
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.

Next, concentrate on your "fretting hand" (the hand closest to the neck of the guitar, when sitting in proper position). The thumb of your fretting hand should rest behind the neck of the guitar, with your fingers in a slightly curled position, poised above the strings. It is extremely important to keep these fingers curled at the knuckles, except when specifically instructed not to do so.
My business was created because of one of the most powerful forces in the universe–love. My daughter desperately wanted to play guitar like her daddy. Like most new guitar students, she was having trouble learning to play. It pained her to quit but she was frustrated and was going to give up. My daughter came to me and said, “Daddy, can’t you do anything to help me play guitar?” I invented the ChordBuddy because I love my daughter and now, she plays and teaches guitar just like her daddy.
If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.
I'm just back from another awesome week residential workshop in Italy (this time near Forli) which was great fun but plagued by me and Dario (the other teacher) having really bad hey fever. There is one spot left on the next acoustic workshop in Tuscany and two spaces for the Blues Jam workshop in late June. See the JustinGuitar Workshop website if you're interested.
Once you’re comfortable playing the chord shape that corresponds to the tab you removed, you can move on to removing the next tab, the next tab, and the next tab. Once all of the tabs are removed, the ultimate goal is that you should have a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts of how to play guitar and shouldn’t require the Chordbuddy anymore. At this point, you can remove the Chordbuddy system completely from your guitar and you’re free to explore.
To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.
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