Tony started playing guitar at the age of 14. At age 18 he relocated to Minneapolis, Minnesota to attend Music Tech of Minneapolis. Through the years he has played throughout the upper midwest and most currently in the Ark-La-Tex area, With his band, SUPERUNKNOWN. Tony teaches all styles of Rock, Metal, Blues, Progressive, Latin Rock and Classical.
It’s a shame this app with excellent content is almost unusable. The app’s buttons (back button etc) when in a lesson frequently become unresponsive . The video control buttons disappear randomly. And there is no way to play the videos in landscape mode, which is basic stuff! I am using iPhone 6 with latest iOS. All in all the app quality does grave injustice to the awesome content. At the minimum, the unresponsive buttons, disappearing video controls (pause, forward/rewind, no skip back 10 seconds!) and lack of landscape mode video must be fixed on priority. Eventually the app must rewritten by some quality/experienced app developers and experts in mobile app user interface/experience . The great content in the app deserves better software for presenting it! Had it not been for the awesome content, I would have given it 1 star.
So impressed was I, that I have broken the list down for you to see the numbers per genre. As you can see some genres are more sparse than others but it does make for a fantastic library of songs, music and tuition. (And if a favourite song of yours is missing you can always go on the forum and request that they try to add it, baring in mind with all the legal requirements it takes at least six months to add!)
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:
If you take the rock 1 course for example, an advanced course, most of the technical stuff is just not explained, teacher says “just remember to move by 3 frets, or just remember it is like that, you don’t need to understand why for now”. And yeah it becomes frustrating to have to look on internet very often when you pay exactly for not having to go somewhere else.

This is easier than it sounds. Each open guitar string is the exact same note as the 5th fret note of the string before it. Therefore, the open 5th string (A) is the same note as the 5th fret on the 6th string (also A). If it is not, adjust the tuning key for the 5th string until the open string note sounds the same as the 5th fret note on the 6th string.

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After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.
Ryan was great! He's obviously a talented guitarist and he is very laid back and makes you feel comfortable. He shows you in detail what you need to do to become a better guitar player. My ONLY advice, and the reason he doesn't get 5 stars, is I think he should have more visual aids with his lessons. For example, write down the different scales or transcribe the first several measures of a song. Then, one has something to refer back to when you are practicing and invariably get stuck. Other than that, I would highly recommend Ryan as a guitar teacher!
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Similar to not just focusing on learning songs… let’s say that you learn your Am Pentatonic Scale (this is a very commonly used scale in guitar playing) and you practice and practice until you can play it cleanly and quickly. So you show it to your friends. Do they care? Probably not, it’s just a scale.  Instead of letting this happen to you, we will show you how to use this scale (and all of the other things you will learn).  We will make sure that you know how the different scales, chords, theory, rhythms, etc can all be applied to learning your favorite songs quickly, writing your own songs, improvising your own awesome solos on the fly, playing with a band, and much more!


Learn the difference between chords and single notes. Chords occur when you play two or more notes on different strings simultaneously to create one unified sound. These are what make up the "rhythm" portion of acoustic music. Single notes are used more for solos and occur when you play a single note at a time. Both are skills that you must become proficient in when learning to play the acoustic guitar.[4]
Justin gives hundreds of hours of lessons away for nothing in return, but he runs the site as a full-time gig and works with an honor system. This allows members to donate what they wish, depending on what they can afford and feel they have gained from using the site. There is also an online store – selling songbooks, DVDs, clothing, and accessories – that allows you to contribute to the site financially, in return for something physical.
3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
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