Now, pick up your guitar, and hold it so the back of the body of the instrument comes in contact with your stomach/chest, and the bottom of the neck runs parallel to the floor. The thickest string on the guitar should be the closest to your face, while the thinnest should be closest to the floor. If this isn't the case, turn the guitar the in other direction. Typically, a right-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the left, whereas a left-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the right.

Next, concentrate on your "fretting hand" (the hand closest to the neck of the guitar, when sitting in proper position). The thumb of your fretting hand should rest behind the neck of the guitar, with your fingers in a slightly curled position, poised above the strings. It is extremely important to keep these fingers curled at the knuckles, except when specifically instructed not to do so.
other subjects are just really introduced but not deeply covered : example for picking techniques, alternate tuning, etc. There is a lesson about circle of fifths for example and it was just not well explained, I sometimes struggle with chris schelegel videos, as he talks super fast and over complicates stuff, so I ended browsing he internet to try understanding some of the stuff he talked about, and then I found much more information on websites and way better explained…

Learn how to transition to different chords. One way to become proficient quickly is to learn how to transition between the various chords quickly. These transition periods are often the hardest for beginners to play when they are starting off. The more you practice between switching to different chords, however, the better you'll get at doing it in songs. Practice switching between open chords like G, A, E, and C. [14]
* Pull off harmonic - Pull off harmonics are used frequently in Rock and Metal. Achieving one is a two step process where you first pull off to an open string with first finger then quickly touch the harmonic at around the 3rd of 4th fret. The result is a high pitched harmonic. This trick works best on the 3rd string. Add a whammy bar dive bomb for maximum effect and sustain.
Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
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I initially bought a few books just to contribute to Justins generous cause, but didn't really think they would be needed as all this is online after all right?... but no, they have actually really helped further my skills along much faster. Just having the song book available when you get the time to play helps a lot (get the ring bound one if you can)
You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).

This is why it’s important to have someone that holds you accountable for prolonging your learning and practicing, regardless of whether it’s a musical instrument, or a sport, or any other after-school matter. Someone to keep you motivated. And if you decide to make your passion a profession, someone to guide you along the way on how to find the right opportunities for paid gigs, or even a full-time career in playing the Guitar.

In the world of piano, if a student is learning a piece of music, there can be several different technical variations so that the student can play the music they want without overwhelming themselves with something that is much too difficult. While some of this exists for modern guitar, it tends to be quite limited unless a student is studying classical guitar.
From a practical perspective, teaching yourself guitar may be the only option. Guitar lessons cost money. If you’ve just scrounged your pennies together in order to afford a decent starter guitar, you may not be eager to throw down another twenty bucks a week or more. Compound this with the fact that most guitar instructors have their own methods and will teach you at their pace, not yours. This makes sense from their standpoint, but it could get a little frustrating and expensive from your point of view.
This is not a substitute for learning scales. At some point down the road you are going to want to dive into music theory at least a little bit, if nothing else so you can understand how scales work and how chords are built. For now you are a beginner, and this exercise can go a long way toward loosening up your fretting hand and improving your technique.
Because people learn in a variety of different ways, the flexibility of the online guitar lessons that you choose will be important. You may prefer to progress through a series of programs or you may want to jump around and pick whatever interests you. Not all online guitar lessons work in the same way, so you will want to consider which programs offer the best “fit” for the way you learn best.
"Working with Chris Pinon is an absolute pleasure. First, he is a professional! He knows his stuff, and is enthusiastic to share his knowledge in a way that will speak to his students. He is approachable, funny, and flexible. He works with his students to help them achieve their goals. After many years of taking different guitar classes and guitar lessons with a variety of teachers, Chris has been my best teacher to date! I really enjoy the online component, because he is able to express his knowledge, hone technique, and share documents instantaneously. His multiple camera setup allows for close-ups of chord shapes, a face shot so you feel like you're in the room with him, and sheet music display. Chris is organized, linear, and present, both online and in person. Online lessons with him have opened up a world of possibility for my guitar and ukulele playing! The website is easy to navigate and payment goes without a hitch. I feel very lucky to be a student of Chris Pinon's."
Here you'll find the JustinGuitar range of books. Method Books include The Beginner's Course and the Intermediate Method. Songbooks include the Beginner Songbook (our biggest seller, over 100,000 copies sold), Volume 2 (an equal, not a sequel!) and a selection of Intermediate Level Songbooks in various styles: Acoustic, Rock, Pop and Vintage (hits from the 60's-80's). These start with "Beginner Plus" which are great for Beginner's consolidating their knowledge and then move onto songs using barre chords and more complex techniques for Intermediate players. There's also a Beginner Ukulele Songbook! I just have one Transcription Book at the moment, the Blues Lead Guitar Solos Book, but more are in the works. Due to the popularity of my site in Germany, we have two titles translated into German!
It’s important to realize there is a fine line between challenging yourself with music that is slightly above your ability, and frustrating yourself with music you have no logical reason to expect yourself to be able to play just yet. This line is different for each new guitarist. Some may work on basic chords for years, and be happy enough with that. Others may dive neck-deep into some fairy difficult music and thrive on the challenge it provides. Point is, go at your own pace, and don’t ever feel like you need to take on more of a challenge than you are ready for.
The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.
At the end of this course, students will understand the structure, parts, and accessories of the instrument, in addition to an understanding of its basic maintenance. Electric guitar players will learn the operation of their instrument along with basic options for amplification, effect pedals, and sounds. Students will also learn to develop correct technique and apply theory concepts to their playing. They will have the foundational knowledge necessary to pursue most intermediate guitar courses.

I have checked out Justin's site and found it to be comprehensive and informative. I have always felt that learning about music and especially music theory applied to the guitar, is helpful in finding your own unique voice on the instrument and expanding your creative horizons. Along with his insight into teaching and his fantastic abilities on the instrument, Justin has created a powerful go-to-place for anyone interested in exploring the instrument to their potential. Just don't hurt yourself.
You’ll need to press the strings down firmly to ensure they ring out well. One of the toughest parts for beginners is ensuring you aren’t “muting” the strings that you aren’t fretting (credit natasha at www.dresshead.com). These small touches get programmed in to your fingers after hours of time, so don’t worry too much about it. Just focus on getting the best sound out of your guitar.
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