Welcome to the official guitar lessons for beginners website. Are you ready to learn how to play guitar? Below you will find twelve step-by-step lessons. They cover everything you need to know in order to start playing real music on the guitar. It doesn't matter if you want to play acoustic guitar, electric guitar, or both. These beginner guitar lessons will get you started.

Justin gives hundreds of hours of lessons away for nothing in return, but he runs the site as a full-time gig and works with an honor system. This allows members to donate what they wish, depending on what they can afford and feel they have gained from using the site. There is also an online store – selling songbooks, DVDs, clothing, and accessories – that allows you to contribute to the site financially, in return for something physical.
If you're an adult finally getting around to learning your dream instrument or a child following your passion of playing music I tailor your lessons specifically to you. We look at what you want to play, pick specific songs that you want to learn, and learn the techniques you need to play these songs. It sounds simple, but it's so effective and much more fun to learn this way!
You Don’t Have to Be a Shark is filled with personal anecdotes and life lessons you might have learned in business school (or at least you think you might have). By drawing from my own life experiences, I will teach you how to how to use pure sales techniques to be more successful in every aspect of your life. My philosophy is simple: great salespeople are made, not born, and no one achieves success in life without knowing how to sell. You Don’t Have to Be a Shark will teach you all that and more. Available now! Order your copy today.
Play the song with the audio recording. Once you've mastered the individual portions of the song, you're ready to play the song in its entirety. Play the song and strum your guitar along with the song. Try to keep up with the tempo of the song you're covering. Follow the tabs as you play. If you mess up, follow the music on the tabs and come back into the song when you're ready. Once you've become proficient at playing the riff, continue practicing until you don't need the tabs anymore.
This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
After teaching guitar and music theory to thousands of students over past three decades, I thought that I had basically 'seen it all' when it comes to guitar instruction. Then I discovered Justin’s website, and man was I impressed! Justin’s caring spirit, attention to detail, vast knowledge base, and especially his lucid, laidback and nurturing style, allow students to fall in love with the learning process. You see, it’s not enough to simply find out how to play a few cool licks or chords. A truly great teacher will make you fall in love with the process of discovery so that you can unlock the best within you. Justin is one of these great teachers, and I highly recommend justinguitar.com to anyone who wants to tap into their best selves.
At Guitar Center Shreveport, we think that music and Southern hospitality should go hand-in-hand. That's why we strive to be as approachable as we are knowledgeable, so you can feel comfortable coming to us for advice whether you're a beginner or a pro. Speaking of coming to us, we're on Youree drive between 70th and Bert Kouns Industrial, which makes us easy to get to from I-49 or the Inner Loop Expressway to the west and south, or Barksdale in the east.First and foremost at Guitar Center Shreveport, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs to lessons, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Shreveport area music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.

Practice at least 20 minutes 6 days a week. Consistent practice will allow you to improve your guitar playing skills over a short period. Taking long breaks and not staying dedicated will wear away your muscle memory and delay the development of your skills. Instead, dedicate 20 minutes to an hour of practice throughout most of the week. During practice, you can either run different drills or you can try covering a song.[15]
When I first came across this product, that’s what I thought as well. However, as I started to learn more about the product it changed my mind. One of the biggest reasons I’ve seen beginner guitar players give up on trying to learn how to play guitar has been because they just weren’t seeing results fast enough. Pressing down the strings hurts their fingers, resulting in them not being able to press down hard enough to produce a clear sounding chord. Some have the determination to practice and overcome this, while others might not have the same motivation.
Depending on the program, School of Rock's guitar lessons can cost from around $150 to $350 per month. Exact prices vary between locations. What's included? Unlike most hourly guitar lessons, our programs include weekly private guitar lessons and group rehearsals that inspire confidence and teamwork. Guitar students are also welcome to use our facilities whenever we're open, even if they just want to hangout and learn from or collaborate with other musicians.
PPS, a lot of the links to the product recommendations above will give us a small commission if you purchase through them. That does not influence the price or my recommendations. Here’s the disclosure policy: Tropical MBA is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates.
The larger choice of lessons on Jamplay is intriguing, but I don’t know. I think I’ll try GT first since it has a longer refund period, and if it doesn’t work out for me, I’ll just get my money back and head on over to jamplay. I mean it’s not like we’re talking about exorbitant amount of $$$ 🙂 I mean the $15 monthly price is like 20 minutes with a live teacher, that’s pretty ridiculous…

My problem with truefire is that they have so much stuff, that you get lost in their site. So for example, if you click on blues courses, they have 116 individual blues courses. They do have so called “learning paths”, where they give you the order in which you should tackle the separate courses, but those are just that, separate courses, so not really created with continuity in mind.


I tried several times over the course of 20 years to learn guitar. I purchased guitars, amps, books, private lessons. Nothing ever stuck, until I found justinguitar.com. The only reason I can play guitar today is because of Justin. His courses are well thought out, easy to understand, easy to follow, and easy to make progress on. I can't think of a single product or service that I've ever used in my life that I could recommend more highly than justinguitar.com.
I'm real fussy about stuff I endorse, I will NEVER ever say to y'all that I play something if I'm not using it and honestly dig it. I do not get paid to use anything, but I do get discounted or free stuff sometimes. I don't have any exclusive deals and often use things not listed below, I'm a bit of gear slut and not particularly faithful ;) Check them out, all seriously great tools for making happy sounds in your ears!
My original thesis behind my site was (and still is), that I want to create lessons that will make people fall in love with the guitar, and get them motivated to play real songs. I think I’m good at creating high quality lessons that beginners will enjoy and draw enthusiasm from, but the thing is that I am a one man show at TheGuitarLesson.com, and there are only so many lessons I can produce, while Jamplay and Guitartricks are “big” companies, pumping out new content non-stop.
I'm just back from another awesome week residential workshop in Italy (this time near Forli) which was great fun but plagued by me and Dario (the other teacher) having really bad hey fever. There is one spot left on the next acoustic workshop in Tuscany and two spaces for the Blues Jam workshop in late June. See the JustinGuitar Workshop website if you're interested.
You may have gone online to look for guitar lessons or to learn the fundamentals of guitar. Even if you just want to learn a few particular songs and increase your knowledge a bit. Even if you are an experienced player, this may be the place to learn that little nuance that you may have felt was missing from your method. Either way, this is the website that you will want to continue to visit.
Let’s be honest, private lessons aren’t the best idea for college students who are generally tight on budget, time, and commitments. However, that doesn’t mean you should stop learning and practicing. You can still work on the guitar by taking classes or participating in music programs at your college. These tend to be more affordable, more social, and less stressful than trying to fit private lessons into your routine.
Success! You’ve decided to make your living doing something you love! You’ve learned so much and come so far, but there are so many styles and variations that you could likely go on finding new and different ways to play guitar forever. Taking the time for a lesson every so often can refresh your playing immensely. New skills lead to new and better songwriting, and more impressive performances, so try to meet with an instructor every month or two.
Your success on guitar, or anything in life, is directly related to the effort you give. Is it true that some people are more gifted than others when it comes to music? Of course, but don’t go around thinking you can't learn guitar because you weren’t born with the right musical aptitude. That's nonsense. Some people may be more gifted, and you can't control that. What you can do is control how hard you work, and promise yourself that nobody will ever outwork you.
"Our son loves his guitar lessons and wants to play. He's the real deal with his own gigs and he teaches using music we love. Garrick gets 5 stars because he unexpectedly requested to join us when we purchased our guitar, picked an appropriate used(!) one with metal strings and had it modified to bring the frets in closer for small fingers. His lessons feel customized. We recommend Garrick!"
Now that your Chordbuddy is in its proper placement and angled upwards, all you need to do is retighten the screw. Be sure to make it fairly tight so that it doesn’t move around as you start playing. Once that’s done, try playing all of your guitar strings without pressing down on any buttons. If the strings all ring clearly, you’ve properly installed the Chordbuddy. Here’s what it should look like when it’s installed.
The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.
The Peavey Chord Buddy is a useful and intuitive teaching tool for those who are just now picking up the guitar. It fits onto the neck of a wide range of electric and acoustic models. The colored circles show where to correctly place fingers to play different notes and how to combine them into the primary chords. As you progress in your skill level, the tabs can be removed one at a time from this guitar buddy until you can play on your own. Included is a song book filled with classics from a range of genres. This guitar chord buddy also comes with an instructional DVD.
Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
Some young players get the idea that you have to first master basic chords and scales before you can move on to playing songs you know by bands you love. Not so. Of course if you are into classical music, progressive metal or jazz that may be true, but you might be surprised to know that much of the rock and country music you hear is based around very simple chord progressions.
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
When playing the guitar sitting down, the body of the guitar will rest on one of your legs. In most styles of guitar playing, the guitar will rest on the leg farthest away from the headstock. This means, a person playing the guitar in a right-handed fashion will typically rest the guitar on his/her right leg, while someone playing the guitar in a lefty manner will rest it on their left leg. (NOTE: proper classical guitarist technique dictates the exact OPPOSITE of the above, but for this lesson, let's stick to our initial explanation)
It’s actually very easy: Play an open sixth string note, followed by the first fret of the sixth string with your first (pointer) finger. Then play the second fret on the same string with your second finger. Then the third with your third (ring) finger, and finally you play the fourth fret on the sixth string with your fourth (pinky) finger. Incidentally, this movement up the neck of one fret a time (or half-step) is called the Chromatic Scale, which is where this exercise gets its name.
Guitar Tricks has become one of the biggest and most popular guitar lesson websites, since its inception in 1998. Today it's thought by many to be the best place to learn guitar online. Their format is almost entirely video-based, with short instruction bits that are usually less than 10 minutes in length. In this Guitar Tricks review, we’ll cover that format and show you how it performs in comparison to other guitar lesson sites.
As a beginner, it is best to avoid making a pawn shop, flea market, or yard sale purchase unless you are shopping with somebody who has experience in purchasing a guitar. Having never purchased a guitar, you may not know what to look for in terms of damage or guitar quality. With that being said, a local music retail shop is your best bet. You may also shop online with a reputable company, although be sure to review the business’ return policy.
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