The neck of the guitar adjoins the "body" of the instrument. The body of the guitar will vary greatly from guitar to guitar. Most acoustic and classical guitars have a hollowed out body, and a "sound hole," designed to project the sound of the guitar. Most electric guitars have a solid body, and thus will not have a sound hole. Electric guitars will instead have "pick-ups" where the soundhole is located. These "pick-ups" are essentially small microphones, which allow the capture the sound of the ringing strings, allowing them to be amplified.
Tapping is a technique where the right hand taps a string and alternates with notes played by the left hand. A basic way you can start tapping is to find three notes that you want to play on one string and play them as triplets using this sequence: tap, pull-off, pull-off. The first note is tapped with your index or middle finger and then pulls-off onto a note held by one of the left hand fingers, which is then pulled-off onto another note held by a left hand finger. Other ways to tap are to use more right hand fingers, use open strings, and to use different rhythms.

Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
Pierre Bensusan on justinguitar.com! Pierre Bensuan (www.pierrebensusan.com) "Lucky you, guitar players from all over the world, to take advantage of the tutorials presented in Justin's comprehensive website! Whatever the style you fancy, Justin is there for you with generous and precise guidance to help you enhance your playing and by doing so, introduce you to so many ways of approaching the guitar and discover new artists along the way. I wish there would have been such a medium and decitated host around when I started to learn how to play. Bravo Justin, and my gratitude for bringing music to the heart and ears of many!"
There's an abundance of guitar information out there on the web, some good, some not. I stumbled across Justin Sandercoe's site a year ago and now tell everyone about it. The lessons are conveyed so clearly, concisely and in the most congenial way. The site is laid out logically as well so you can to go straight to your area of interest... beginner, blues, rock, folk, jazz, rhythm, fingerpicking... it's all there and more. Spend ten minutes with Justin and you'll not only play better but feel better too. From novice to know-it-all, everyone will learn something from Sandercoe.
Barbara Corcoran states that she is going to offer one hundred and seventy five thousand dollars, in exchange for a twenty percent stake in Chord Buddy. However, fifty thousand dollars of the total investment must be used to make an infomercial, because Barbara Corcoran thinks that Chord Buddy is a great product, but Travis Perry is a great person as well. He needs to sell himself in an infomercial, in order to sell his product.

The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.


Some young players get the idea that you have to first master basic chords and scales before you can move on to playing songs you know by bands you love. Not so. Of course if you are into classical music, progressive metal or jazz that may be true, but you might be surprised to know that much of the rock and country music you hear is based around very simple chord progressions.

You’ll need to press the strings down firmly to ensure they ring out well. One of the toughest parts for beginners is ensuring you aren’t “muting” the strings that you aren’t fretting (credit natasha at www.dresshead.com). These small touches get programmed in to your fingers after hours of time, so don’t worry too much about it. Just focus on getting the best sound out of your guitar.
First: I am now 73 years on this earth. Last February I decided to try learning some about guitar playing. For me it was like one of those things i'd thought about a lot but never made the time to pursue. Then I thought I might be to old to add new talent to this body. After reading and viewing a lot of information on line and contact with a local teaching facility I decided to give Guitartricks a try. I am a DIY person and if given good instruction am able to learn quickly. I found the instruction at Guitartricks to be very clear and concise so I was able to quickly put the instructions into practice. I started with Lisa McCormick who made me familiar with the basics and led me clearly to achieve my goals of being able to entertain family and myself. I have Arthritis in my hands so some of the four finger and Bar cords are just out of reach for me. That has not stopped me from learning the basic cords and having a whale of a time playing with those. Surprised me at just how many songs you can keep up with using only a few cords! Guitartricks offers a whole lot for your money and always offers extra help if you have a need for some. They offer one on one, and group sessions if you are inclined. The instructors are great people who care about you being able to achieve your personal goals with guitar. I owe special thanks to Lisa McCormick, Caren Armstrong, and Anders Mouridsen. If you want to learn guitar, and are willing to apply the time needed for practice, Guitartricks is the place. Take it from this old kid you're never to old to learn some new tricks. Thank You,
It’s actually very easy: Play an open sixth string note, followed by the first fret of the sixth string with your first (pointer) finger. Then play the second fret on the same string with your second finger. Then the third with your third (ring) finger, and finally you play the fourth fret on the sixth string with your fourth (pinky) finger. Incidentally, this movement up the neck of one fret a time (or half-step) is called the Chromatic Scale, which is where this exercise gets its name.
At Guitar Center Shreveport, we think that music and Southern hospitality should go hand-in-hand. That's why we strive to be as approachable as we are knowledgeable, so you can feel comfortable coming to us for advice whether you're a beginner or a pro. Speaking of coming to us, we're on Youree drive between 70th and Bert Kouns Industrial, which makes us easy to get to from I-49 or the Inner Loop Expressway to the west and south, or Barksdale in the east.First and foremost at Guitar Center Shreveport, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs to lessons, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Shreveport area music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
While four years old is a little young for formal guitar lessons, it's not too early to begin teaching your child musical concepts that will be important once they are old enough for guitar instruction at School of Rock. Your 4-year-old can participate in the Little Wing music program to learn fundamental concepts through fun, dynamic musical activities. 

Power chords are one of the staples of rock music and one of the most important guitar chord types you need to have in your toolbox. They are important to learn for a few reasons: They’re easy to play They’re used a TON in many popular songs and are very versatile. They’ll help broaden your repertoire of guitar sounds / styles. This post will walk you through step-by-step what a power chord is, how to play them and what songs you can learn to start practicing them. What are Power Chords? Whether you play an acoustic or electric guitar, you are going

Hi there, that’s a good question, I had to go into my accounts on jamplay and guitartricks to look around for you. It looks to me like Jamplay has more fingerstyle lessons, they even have dedicated courses on various subgenres of fingerstyle guitar. So if you are at an intermediate level already, and want start “mastering” fingerstyle guitar, I would recommend Jamplay. If you’re still a beginner, than it would be best if you reach an intermediate level first on Guitartricks, so you are well rounded in everything guitar. I always recommend that specializing towards any given genre should come after you have a solid knowledge of the basics, and are comfortable with anything they throw at you 🙂
Power chords are one of the staples of rock music and one of the most important guitar chord types you need to have in your toolbox. They are important to learn for a few reasons: They’re easy to play They’re used a TON in many popular songs and are very versatile. They’ll help broaden your repertoire of guitar sounds / styles. This post will walk you through step-by-step what a power chord is, how to play them and what songs you can learn to start practicing them. What are Power Chords? Whether you play an acoustic or electric guitar, you are going

I got all involved with Guitar Tricks and bought a full access membership several years ago. Then I spent MUCH more money on “packages” to learn the songs of specific artists (Eagles, Clapton, etc.). Those packages were housed online, but I was supposed to have access forever in return for the rather large sums I was paying. After a few months, I completely got cut off from my packages. They disappeared. No access. I emailed and emailed – no response. I never posted on their chat room, so I couldn’t have said anything that upset them or gave them reason to cut me off. I talked to a lady several times who didn’t help me at all. In fact, she acted like their site is flawless and I must be wrong. No help. I ended up paying them hundreds and getting ripped off. I would warn everyone to proceed with caution.
In the world of piano, if a student is learning a piece of music, there can be several different technical variations so that the student can play the music they want without overwhelming themselves with something that is much too difficult. While some of this exists for modern guitar, it tends to be quite limited unless a student is studying classical guitar.
Ideally, most people would prefer to be able to take lessons in the style of music that they enjoy the most, and that is one of the things you will get with Guitar Tricks. This will enable you to learn just about every level of guitar skill and technique for any type of music. According to a vast number of past and current students who have experienced this type of training, “…it is the best way to learn!”
"My daughter is taking Skype guitar lessons with Daniel. It's going great. She improves every week. Daniel is able to adjust his lessons to her learning style. His awareness and flexibility has contributed greatly to her learning. The Skype experience is fine, I think my daughter concentrates better with Skype because there is nothing distracting her from her instruction. Also, Daniel is great about following up with practice and providing practice videos. I highly recommend Daniel for guitar lessons. His online instruction is fun for my daughter and provides a complete learning experience."
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:
We were privileged to have worked with hundreds of top artists and educators who authored the original magazine articles and then recorded audio lessons in their own studios. While video is the medium of choice today, these 1,200+ audio lessons still deliver amazing instruction from some of the best in the biz — perfect for those long drives and commutes!
"My daughter is taking Skype guitar lessons with Daniel. It's going great. She improves every week. Daniel is able to adjust his lessons to her learning style. His awareness and flexibility has contributed greatly to her learning. The Skype experience is fine, I think my daughter concentrates better with Skype because there is nothing distracting her from her instruction. Also, Daniel is great about following up with practice and providing practice videos. I highly recommend Daniel for guitar lessons. His online instruction is fun for my daughter and provides a complete learning experience."
The quality of a few older lessons are subpar, they should just remove those or reshoot them. For example, there is a teacher called Hanspeter Kruesi, who seems like a nice guy, presents useful content, but the 360p lessons shot YouTube style at his house in front of his PC don't live up to my expectations. I'm just talking about a few lessons here, but still.
A few years back, I dusted off the ol' Takamine I got in high school to try some 'music therapy' with my disabled son, who was recovering from a massive at-birth stroke. This reignited my long dormant passion to transform myself from a beach strummer to a 'real' musician; however, as a single mom, taking in-person lessons was financially difficult. Then I found Justinguitar! Flash forward to today; my son is almost fully recovered (YAY!), my guitar collection has grown significantly, and I'm starting to play gigs. None of this would have been possible without your guidance and generosity, Justin. Thank you for being part of the journey!
After the 3 Stages, we have an Essential Skills module which you could check out any time you want - it's stuff that you'll find super helpful on your journey :) You'll probably find my Practical Music Theory course super fun if you're the type who likes to understand what they're doing - it's not essential for beginners but most people seem to really enjoy it!
There really isn't a best age for kids to start guitar lessons, but most children under the age of 7 generally don't have the dexterity or patience needed to learn to play the guitar. With persistence and motivation some kids have learned to play guitar at some impressively young ages, but it really comes down to is the individual attitude and maturity level of the student. 
Sandercoe has been featured and written for Guitar Techniques magazine, including the Led Zeppelin cover feature, issue GT108 and the Tasty Chord column. He has also been featured in Total Guitar and in Guitar magazine, with The Counterfeit Stones. He has been published in Guitar Tutor, the magazine of the Registry Of Guitar Tutors, and has instructed masterclasses about teaching transcribing at their annual conference. He has also given masterclasses for The Institute of Contemporary Music Performance and The International Guitar Federation.
You can turn on a backing track and play along with whatever your creativity wants that day. If do not always have access to a band, having the jam station works just like having your own band! They even have the sheet music below each jam which is very helpful. The jam station is great to use if you are a creative musician looking for some inspiration.
Do you want to start guitar lessons but you're wondering how long it will take you to see the payoff? Or, have you already started and you're wondering if you're really making progress? Guitar teacher Peter M. shares just how long it really takes most students to learn guitar... This age old question has been asked by nearly all of my students for as long as I’ve been teaching: how long will it take to learn how to play guitar? Will it take a week? A month? A year? Longer? And the answer i … Read More
I concur, lots of very good lessons on Guitar Tricks. However, one thing I don’t see commented on is that for most of the song lessons and some technical lessons you cannot download and print the music (which I understand for published songs because it is protected) but the on-screen music notation doesn’t scroll with the video lesson, jam track etc. (like it does on several other lesson sites). All that is visible is one 8 or 12 bar section of the song. In other words, short of memorizing the song, there is no way to play along. Made the comment to GT customer support and they said essentially – Yeah we know. My analogy is a canoe without a paddle. Not totally useless but almost.

After you are comfortable with the basics, you can move on to learn different styles: blues, country, rock. Each style is explained thoroughly, as well as the techniques that you would use to play each style of music. Another great feature we found was that since each style requires different gear, amp setings, and generally a different tone, Guitar Tricks walks you through getting the right tone for the given style as well.
I decided to try to learn how to play the guitar so I could sing and play with my preschool class. I was getting very frustrated because my fingers would not do what I want them to do. I put the chord buddy on my guitar and could play a dozen songs the first night. Just wish they made more of these in different keys so I did not have to re-key the songs I want to be able to play. It will take some practice because you do have to press down on the tabs very hard to get a clear not so need to build up some more strength in my left hand so the strings don't twang.
It shouldn’t be a surprise that students learn faster when taking private guitar lessons or classes, compared to watching video tutorials or YouTube videos. Finding a specialized teacher - whether in-home, studio, or online classes - for one-on-one guitar tutoring will give you the feedback and personal attention you need to become the best guitar player you can be!
There are hundreds of free guitar lessons here and it's taken a lot of work over nearly 15 years for me to create it all. It's important to me to help everyone that wants to learn to play the guitar, not just those with money for tuition, so I run it on an "honour system" and I rely on the honesty of users like your good self to make a donation if they can afford to.
This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.

Of course, this top-down lecturing is all very abstract without examples. Let me give you the worst case scenario. My school talent show, 2008. Two friends of mine performED an ambitious but utterly inappropriate Metallica cover in front of the other students, their parents and the faculty. It was excruciating. Although the solos (presumably the only thing they had bothered to practice) were technically flawless, the whole song was undone by their terrible rhythm. The timing of the song became displaced, the chords were so badly fingered that it was difficult to hear the riff and consequently the whole performance fell apart. They looked like morons. They had sacrificed learning basic rhythm and paid the price. Make sure you don’t do the same.
I was lucky enough to meet Justin at the Guitar Institute during a summer school in 2004, and to have some private lessons with him afterwards.  He was the teacher who kickstarted my guitar career and persuaded me that I was ready to join a band.  That was 14 years ago and many dozens of gigs later.  I’m now just finishing a degree in Popular Music Performance.  Justin's online lessons are easy to follow and he has a manner about him which makes you believe that you can achieve.  Where he demonstrates songs, I have found his versions to be consistently more accurate and easy to follow than those of any other online teacher.  On this website you really will find all the skills and information you need to become an excellent musician.  Many thanks. Ian.
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