It’s important to realize there is a fine line between challenging yourself with music that is slightly above your ability, and frustrating yourself with music you have no logical reason to expect yourself to be able to play just yet. This line is different for each new guitarist. Some may work on basic chords for years, and be happy enough with that. Others may dive neck-deep into some fairy difficult music and thrive on the challenge it provides. Point is, go at your own pace, and don’t ever feel like you need to take on more of a challenge than you are ready for.
The above diagram may look confusing... fear not, it's one of the most common methods of explaining notes on the guitar and is actually quite easy to read. The above represents the neck of the guitar when looked at head on. The first vertical line on the left of the diagram is the sixth string. The line to the right of that is the fifth string. And so on. The horizontal lines in the diagram represent the frets on the guitar... the space between the top horizontal line, and the one below it is the first fret. The space between that second horizontal line from the top and the one below it is the second fret. And so on. The "0" above the diagram represents the open string for the string it is positioned above. Finally, the black dots are indicators that these notes should be played.

The first thing I did when I got the Chordbuddy was I took it out of the box and try to attach it to my guitar. Now, I did do some reading up prior to receiving the Chordbuddy and one of the biggest problem that came up was that people just weren’t able to attach it to their guitar properly. Without reading the instructions, I of course, had the same problem. However, once you know how to properly install the Chordbuddy (which I’ll explain in the next section), you should have no troubles.
It is also the reason why it is as important for him to employ people and give them a chance, as it is to create a great product that will be used by millions of guitar enthusiasts. Travis Perry states that he absolutely needs an investment from the Sharks, because he has been able to make his product known on the market, but he has ran out of money.

On a day when there's a temptation to go into a dark place, and only see all the bad stuff there is in the world ... greed, cruelty, exploitation, selfishness ... I get days like that pretty often .... it's great to find someone giving out, and giving out good, and operating on an honour basis ... There are so many people who can't afford Guitar lessons .... well, here's a wonderful guy who has set up a whole system of teaching guitar ... Blues, Jazz, Rock, even Songwriting, from the basics, tuning the guitar, etc ... upwards ... If you use his site, it's up to you to determine how much you can contribute ... but this is an amazing site .... he is also very aware of issues in the world which need attention ... a great channel .. Check him out. He's a giver.
GuitarTricks has many incredible resources including theory, techniques, styles, and even videos on how to play songs. If you are a beginner or early intermediate this could be a very helpful resource. The instructors are all reputable and since some of them choose to cover a similar style or technique you have the option to learn the same material but from an instructor who matches better with your learning style. The only drawback is that they do not have much for more advanced players. Customer service is very quick to respond to messages and make all processes quick and simple.
Guitar Gopher....I had walked away from learning guitar with instructor years back, but I had been playing and learning on my own...the sound is there but at times it sucks....we set up practice time with experience players sometimes its above what I know.....so I shy away slowly until I'm outside the building....trying to think what that was all about....but now I've come upon your set of learning the 5 steps to learning guitar...I'll start all over to give a try one more time on your suggestion about playing guitar....thank you for your counseling and giving guidance....you made a great recommendation, thanks for the opinions.

Justin, first off I just wanted to say thanks for all the advice and instruction. You make playing guitar easy and understandable and fun. You explain very well the hows and whys when presenting a new song to learn and walk it through so that anyone can learn. I have played guitar for 20 years now and have learned more from you in the last five years than the previous 15 by myself. You have also been a tremendous help to both my son and my daughter in learning to play as well by making playing fun and interesting. I have a couple of pictures of me and my children all doing what we love. Many Thanks to you Justin

Now this of course does not mean that we won’t do songs, as playing your favorite songs is a very fun and good part of playing guitar. What this means is that instead of falling into the trap of just learning one song, then another, then another and never actually learning how things work, we will be sure to show you HOW SONGS WORK so that when you learn or play a song you can learn it by understanding the core idea of the song instead of trying to memorize the several hundred individual notes that are inside of the song.  Basically, we will make sure you understand how music works so that you are free to have fun not just learning and memorizing songs, but also by playing on the fly or writing your own songs!


There is a better player in all of us, but we often get trapped in unhealthy, tension-filled technique. Join Stephanie Bradley as we explore the most efficient ways to play faster, cleaner and healthier. We will dissect the requirements of speed, while studying the techniques of alternate, tremolo, sweep, and economy picking within a rock and lead context.

In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
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