Springbox was hired by a legal software developer to do some work on their digital marketing. By analyzing the competition, Springbox looked for areas where the developer could top their competition. They also helped with branding and improved their Google search rankings. Springbox provided the developer with enough help to get the new business off the ground.
Goals are the most important part of your plan. If you have completed your research, you should have been able to identify your weaknesses and areas of opportunities. Setting both quantitative and qualitative goals around these findings, as well as developing KPIs, will be essential. They will help you to set a clear path, understand your marketing ROI and redirect your tactics as you move through the year, if you find certain strategies are working better than others.

In addition to completing a SWOT for your overall marketing plan, it is often helpful to do a SWOT analysis for the different segments within your marketing plan. For example, as we will discuss further down in this piece, content marketing, social media and SEO will all be important parts of your overall inbound marketing plan and would benefit from SWOTs of their own.
When you work with us, don’t expect to get locked in to a marketing tactic just because it’s trendy or “cutting edge.” Instead, you’ll create results-driven marketing programs that hold steadfast to your “APM”— audience, purpose and messaging. So, whether through marketing automation, digital advertising, content marketing or a campaign that knits them all together, expect your marketing programs to fit your business needs and objectives.
Foote, Cone & Belding rebranded from Draftfcb in 2014 after Draft Worldwide and FCB merged in 2006. Now as FCB, the agency is a global, fully integrated marketing communications company that aims to change consumer behavior to the benefit of its clients, its people and society. Owned by Interpublic Group, FCB has worked with Clorox, Levi’s, Dockers, Michelob ULTRA and more.
One of the first questions we receive is how to  assess how much your digital marketing agency is currently worth. There are many ways to measure the value of a digital marketing agency. The simplest and most widely used variant is profit margins. Numbers vary widely both in averages for a digital-only agency as well as the true calculation. For our purposes, we work off of both a multiplier on EBITDA as well as general Net Profit margin. Generally speaking, agency buyers are looking for companies that boast a profit margin of at least 17% but we’ve seen successful acquisitions for much less profitable agencies that boasted IP value, headcount strength, revenue growth or plain geographic diversification. Regardless of if you’re pursuing M&A, if your agency profits reach or exceed that number, then you’re in great shape. If not, there are ways to improve this but don’t be afraid to determine the other methods of evaluation with us or another acquiring group.
For over 40 years, Epsilon has helped drive business growth for brands. The global marketing company employs over 8,000 people in 70 offices worldwide and is a subsidiary of Alliance Data Systems Corp, a loyalty and marketing services company. Epsilon specializes in data, customer insights, loyalty, email, CRM and digital strategy. Ad Age recognized the agency as the #1 World CRM/Direct Marketing Network, #1 U.S. Agency from All Disciplines and #1 Largest U.S. Mobile Marketing Agency.
After being disappointed with their paid search results, a West Coast public university hired HawkSEM to boost its paid advertising game. The project is ongoing and includes Google AdWords and retargeting campaigns that aim to attract students to programs within the university such as master's or business certificate opportunities. HawkSEM takes a hands-on approach, developing the paid advertising strategy, creating ad copy, managing the university's bids, and tracking progress. The results? Forty-percent more leads at half the cost.
Targeting: Evaluate the attractiveness of the customer segments and the projected commercial success. Choosing your segments wisely is really important. One segment might be more financially stable than another at the given moment in time, but maybe in a few months’ or years’ time this segment changes. We need to anticipate where our customers are and customize our product and communication accordingly.
"They hit the ground running, learning what our programs are, and fine-tuning the strategy around the keywords in the ad copy. ... Having the same account managers has been tremendously helpful because they know how we are and what our programs are about. They’re constantly refining our strategy and our messaging, and that wouldn’t be possible if we were constantly being shuffled around." – Director of Marketing, Public University
"We are getting more traffic, but it's also better-quality traffic, compared to what we used to have. People are staying on our site longer, and they're filling lead submissions. SEO.com did a great job on our website development. We've seen a jump in mobile and organic traffic since it was launched." – Director of Marketing, Home Construction Firm
If you haven’t received an offer from a suitable buyer yet, you can always reach out to reputable companies that acquire digital marketing agencies. Business brokers can be beneficial here because of their extensive network, but you shouldn’t be afraid to lean on your own professional network to find the right buyer. Try sending out a few emails to trusted contacts that express your interest in selling your company. Last but not least, you have the option of contacting potential buyers directly. Most growing digital marketing agencies and consultancies have an acquisitions page on their site you can use to get in touch with the right people.

ACQ5 Awards: Strategic Communications Agency of the Year 2017, Gamechanger of the Year 2017, CV Magazine Awards: New York Marketing and Advertisement Entrepreneur, Northeast US Most Innovative Marketing and Advertising President, Davey Awards: Content and Marketing Branded Social Campaign, Game Marketing Summit: Outstanding Overall Marketing Campaign 2016, Overall Mobile Campaign 2016, Outstanding Overall Advertising Campaign 2016, Pro Awards: Best Campaign Targeting Millennials 2016, Best Use of Social/Viral Marketing in a Campaign 2016
Top-level reflection: In the daily hurly-burly of competitive business, it's hard to turn your attention to the big picture, especially those parts that aren't directly related to the daily operations. You need to take time periodically to really think about your business--whether it's providing you and your employees with what you want, whether there aren't some innovative wrinkles you can add, whether you're getting all you can out of your products, your sales staff and your markets. Writing your marketing plan is the best time to do this high-level thinking. Some companies send their top marketing people away to a retreat. Others go to the home of a principal. Some do marketing plan development at a local motel, away from phones and fax machines, so they can devote themselves solely to thinking hard and drawing the most accurate sketches they can of the immediate future of the business.

The purpose of a marketing budget is to pull together all the revenues and costs involved in marketing into one comprehensive document. The budget is a managerial tool that balances what is needed to be spent against what can be afforded, and helps make choices about priorities. A budget can further be used to measure a business's performance in the general trends of a business's spending.
FedEx. Commentators are forever saying how dumb corporate name and logo changes are. Well, they're clueless. As with anything else, name changes range from dumb to brilliant and everything in between. Adopting the viral conjunction "FedEx" allowed Federal Express (FDX) to capitalize on its leadership in express mail while diversifying into ground and other business services. It was brilliant. And its advertising has been groundbreaking, as well.
Jacob Zimmerem suggested that the definition should cover three dimensions: "customer groups" to be served, "customer needs" to be served, and "technologies" to be used.[6] Thus, the definition of IBM's "corporate mission" in the 1940s might well have been: "We are in the business of handling accounting information [customer need] for the larger US organizations [customer group] by means of punched cards [technology]."
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