All of this advice stems from starting an agency by yourself. If you have a partner or two that want to do it with you, then it changes things quite a bit. With that being said, the profits are going to be split and you’re going to have to either charge higher rates or take on more clients to make it mutually beneficial to the point where it’s better than having a normal day job. Just something to keep in mind.

As you search, cut and paste the results into a spreadsheet. (I have found that in Excel it works best to copy the results from the Overture Keyword Tool and then using paste special and then paste as text.) Once you have done this for 2-3 key terms, you should have a spreadsheet with 200 or 300 rows. To analyze the results and make them useful for your business, you need to figure out which terms are the best ones for your company to focus on. To do this, try the following steps:
Samsung Display is the world’s leading professional digital display company known for their unrivaled innovation and quality. Samsung Display partnered with Jellyfish to re-imagine the web presence for their Public Information Display division. Together, we have built a powerful digital platform available in English, Korean, and Chinese to increase awareness and engagement, generate leads, and improve the experience for existing customers. To see the site, click here. 

A resort management company hired The Brandon Agency to assist an in-house social media manager with social media marketing on Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram. They create videos and write articles for the client every month to ensure there’s enough content to share across the resort’s many social sites. The Brandon Agency also manages TripAdvisor, TripConnect, and Instant Book for the client.
Today, most business purchasers looking to buy a product or service start the process by using a search engine to find vendors and product information. How can you make sure that your business is found when these people are looking for you or your competitors? You need to make sure you rank high in the search engine results, for as many search terms as possible, and hopefully for many of the terms that are searched for more frequently. The first step toward ranking high in the results for the most common terms that people search for is to have the right keywords as part of your online presence.
Chart to success: We all know that plans are imperfect things. How can you possibly know what's going to happen 12 months or five years from now? Isn't putting together a marketing plan an exercise in futility . . . a waste of time better spent meeting with customers or fine-tuning production? Yes, possibly but only in the narrowest sense. If you don't plan, you're doomed, and an inaccurate plan is far better than no plan at all. To stay with our sea captain analogy, it's better to be 5 or even 10 degrees off your destination port than to have no destination in mind at all. The point of sailing, after all, is to get somewhere, and without a marketing plan, you'll wander the seas aimlessly, sometimes finding dry land but more often than not floundering in a vast ocean. Sea captains without a chart are rarely remembered for discovering anything but the ocean floor.
Preparation is key. Abraham Lincoln once said, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” Whether you are chopping down a tree or executing an integrated marketing plan, the steps you take ahead of time to lay out your plan and ensure you have all of the proper (and optimized) tools, are crucial to your marketing success.
This introductory section contains an overview of your situation as it exists today and will provide a useful benchmark as you adapt and refine your plan in the coming months. Begin with a short description of your current product or service offering, the marketing advantages and challenges you face, and a look at the threats posed by your competitors. Describe any outside forces that will affect your business in the coming year--this can be anything from diminished traffic levels due to construction if you're a retailer or a change in law that could affect a new product introduction if you're an inventor, for example.

After being disappointed with their paid search results, a West Coast public university hired HawkSEM to boost its paid advertising game. The project is ongoing and includes Google AdWords and retargeting campaigns that aim to attract students to programs within the university such as master's or business certificate opportunities. HawkSEM takes a hands-on approach, developing the paid advertising strategy, creating ad copy, managing the university's bids, and tracking progress. The results? Forty-percent more leads at half the cost.
Apple. Apple (AAPL) stands as the one technology company that truly gets marketing. It defines the next big thing and creates game-changers in existing markets before people themselves even know what they want. It doesn't use focus groups or research; Apple is its own focus group. It controls its channel and message better than any company on earth. Not to mention the 1984 Super Bowl, Think Different, and iPod silhouette ad campaigns.
Until Vivendi, a French mass media conglomerate, acquired Havas in 2017, the agency was one of the largest independent advertising agencies in the world. Headquartered in New York, the network brings together 11,000 experts in 76 countries and is the largest unit of the Havas Group. The agency’s client list is extensive with partners such as Air France, Pernod Ricard, Lacoste, Jack Daniel’s, Ubisoft, IBM and more. Learn more.

Crowd is a global communications and design agency headquartered in San Francisco with multiple locations in the United States, Toronto, Shenzhen, London, and Dubai. The 30-person team offers comprehensive communication and marketing capabilities, including full-service web design and social media campaigns. Clients of Crowd vary widely in terms of industry and scale, demonstrating the small firm's versatility in providing digital solutions.  
This "corporate mission" can be thought of as a definition of what the organization is, or what it does: "Our business is ...". This definition should not be too narrow, or it will constrict the development of the organization; a too rigorous concentration on the view that "We are in the business of making meat-scales," as IBM was during the early 1900s, might have limited its subsequent development into other areas. On the other hand, it should not be too wide or it will become meaningless; "We want to make a profit" is not too helpful in developing specific plans.
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