"At 50 I finally decided to learn to play guitar. With my hectic schedule, I needed something that was ready and available when I had time. Learning Guitar 1 was a fantastic introduction to guitar basics. I love that it started with elementary, straightforward concepts and chords that I could grasp and learn. It even talks about HOW to practice. Then the course built on those simple things by adding other simple chords, strumming, and then working up to simple songs. I'm on my way!" - Daniel Rode, TrueFire Student
Hopefully, you've found, bought or borrowed a guitar pick. If not, you'll need to buy yourself some. Don't be stingy, go and pick up at least 10 of them — guitar picks are easy to lose (they often don't cost more than 30 or 40 cents each). You can experiment with different shapes and brands, but I highly recommend medium gauge picks to start; ones that aren't too flimsy, or too hard.
This is easier than it sounds. Each open guitar string is the exact same note as the 5th fret note of the string before it. Therefore, the open 5th string (A) is the same note as the 5th fret on the 6th string (also A). If it is not, adjust the tuning key for the 5th string until the open string note sounds the same as the 5th fret note on the 6th string.
I have been taking lessons with Justin on line for approximately 1 year. I started out with another teacher on the internet, and wasted one full year with the first guys lessons, I really learned nothing more than the basic chords and I played sloppy because I never learned any technique. Once I stared Justin's lessons, I improved almost immediately. Even if you do take his free online lessons, I highly recommend this book as a supplement. I am on to his Intermediate lesson plan, but I decided to get this book anyways, and I am so glad that I did. I am able to play many of these songs after about 5 minutes of my first attempt.
Wow, cool video man, uber informative. It’s interesting to see the side by side like this. I haven’t quite decided which site I’m gonna go with, but I’m leaning more towards guitartricks right now. I used to play a bit when I was younger, so I’m basically restarting the guitar, and those quick to the point lessons from guitartricks come off as a nice way of relearning everything I had long forgotten. I also want to learn Beatles songs, and it looks like only gutartricks has those.
I decided to try to learn how to play the guitar so I could sing and play with my preschool class. I was getting very frustrated because my fingers would not do what I want them to do. I put the chord buddy on my guitar and could play a dozen songs the first night. Just wish they made more of these in different keys so I did not have to re-key the songs I want to be able to play. It will take some practice because you do have to press down on the tabs very hard to get a clear not so need to build up some more strength in my left hand so the strings don't twang.
You may have gone online to look for guitar lessons or to learn the fundamentals of guitar. Even if you just want to learn a few particular songs and increase your knowledge a bit. Even if you are an experienced player, this may be the place to learn that little nuance that you may have felt was missing from your method. Either way, this is the website that you will want to continue to visit.
I've started off a new series with the awesome Ariel Posen, The Captains Privates series is popular as ever and I've also been filling in some beginner lessons of things I get asked about all the time... I'm about to re-kindle the Blues Lead 3 series which fell off the wagon somewhere and also get the gear videos rocking again... so lots in the works, lots going on and still loving it!

This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
When you play the right note or chord, you will hear it. It will be a pleasant sound, it will be clear and won't have any blocked string sounds (unless it needs to, but you'll get to that later). To play a note or chord correctly, you have to get your fingers in the right position and press as hard as you can on the frets; it will become a habit if you practice enough.
Overall, I believe that the Chordbuddy guitar learning system does have its purposes. It's a good tool to keep children, senior citizens, or people with disabilities motivated and eager to learn how to play the guitar. One of the main issues is that users aren't able to easily attach the device to their guitar which I believe could be improved upon. However, if done properly, the Chordbuddy should work fine and allow you to strum clear sounding chords in a matter of minutes.
Do you want to start guitar lessons but you're wondering how long it will take you to see the payoff? Or, have you already started and you're wondering if you're really making progress? Guitar teacher Peter M. shares just how long it really takes most students to learn guitar... This age old question has been asked by nearly all of my students for as long as I’ve been teaching: how long will it take to learn how to play guitar? Will it take a week? A month? A year? Longer? And the answer i … Read More

Learn how to transition to different chords. One way to become proficient quickly is to learn how to transition between the various chords quickly. These transition periods are often the hardest for beginners to play when they are starting off. The more you practice between switching to different chords, however, the better you'll get at doing it in songs. Practice switching between open chords like G, A, E, and C. [14]
Determine the guitar riff that you want to learn. Listen to acoustic guitar songs that you enjoy and choose one that you'd like to learn. When finding your first song, try to find a song that has an easy chord progression. Listen to the song and determine how many chord changes it has and the speed in which the song is played. If there aren't that many chords or the song seems simple to play, you should choose that song as your first song to learn.

What you see on this page is the heart of Guitar Tricks’ presentation and is used to display all video content. The interface is smooth and intuitive, allowing you to use and see almost all of the content above the fold (without having to scroll down). The video player itself offers some different resolution options as well as a looping feature that allows you to repeat certain portions of the video.

Some young players get the idea that you have to first master basic chords and scales before you can move on to playing songs you know by bands you love. Not so. Of course if you are into classical music, progressive metal or jazz that may be true, but you might be surprised to know that much of the rock and country music you hear is based around very simple chord progressions.


This is not a substitute for learning scales. At some point down the road you are going to want to dive into music theory at least a little bit, if nothing else so you can understand how scales work and how chords are built. For now you are a beginner, and this exercise can go a long way toward loosening up your fretting hand and improving your technique.

Justin Guitar offers a section dedicated to reference – items that will help you develop as a guitarist. There are reference pages (under the ‘Knowledge’ tab on the top menu) on scales, chords and arpeggios, as well as pages that cover guitar gear, including pedal boards and tone settings. You’ll also find some useful printable PDFs of blank TAB pages, blank chord boxes, blank manuscripts and more.
other subjects are just really introduced but not deeply covered : example for picking techniques, alternate tuning, etc. There is a lesson about circle of fifths for example and it was just not well explained, I sometimes struggle with chris schelegel videos, as he talks super fast and over complicates stuff, so I ended browsing he internet to try understanding some of the stuff he talked about, and then I found much more information on websites and way better explained…
You’ll also notice that each button requires a different amount of pressure in order for the chord to play properly. The further away the buttons are from the guitar’s nut, the less pressure is required. Vice-versa, the closer you get to the nut, the more pressure is required (i.e. blue button requires the least amount of pressure while the yellow button requires the most).

This is why it’s important to have someone that holds you accountable for prolonging your learning and practicing, regardless of whether it’s a musical instrument, or a sport, or any other after-school matter. Someone to keep you motivated. And if you decide to make your passion a profession, someone to guide you along the way on how to find the right opportunities for paid gigs, or even a full-time career in playing the Guitar.

Try out different strumming patterns and rhythms. Once you're able to produce a good sounding chord, try strumming it at different tempos and rhythms. Rhythm is based on your strumming pattern, and how long you're holding your notes. Try a basic 1-2-3-4 beat, otherwise known as a 4/4. The number on the top represents how many beats there are in the measure. Try strumming up and down in different progressions to create a different sound for your rhythm. Once you get a basic rhythm down, you can start to incorporate quicker or slower strumming.[8]
There’s plenty of people with small hands who play the guitar. Nine times out of ten smaller people confuse the terrible awkwardness that comes with the first week of playing the guitar and mistakenly think it’s because their hands are small. Again, you’re teaching your hands to do really strange movements here. Imagine going to an advanced yoga class having never stretched before, that’s basically what you’re doing.
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