Some instructors spend too much time talking about theory and other things mixed right in with the middle of the song instruction, irrelevant to actually learning the song, and then fly way to rapidly though the chords, progressions and riffs, making learning difficult and multiple rewinds and replays necessary. (Example; Behind Blue Eyes by Mark Olesky. )
My business was created because of one of the most powerful forces in the universe–love. My daughter desperately wanted to play guitar like her daddy. Like most new guitar students, she was having trouble learning to play. It pained her to quit but she was frustrated and was going to give up. My daughter came to me and said, “Daddy, can’t you do anything to help me play guitar?” I invented the ChordBuddy because I love my daughter and now, she plays and teaches guitar just like her daddy.
I decided to try to learn how to play the guitar so I could sing and play with my preschool class. I was getting very frustrated because my fingers would not do what I want them to do. I put the chord buddy on my guitar and could play a dozen songs the first night. Just wish they made more of these in different keys so I did not have to re-key the songs I want to be able to play. It will take some practice because you do have to press down on the tabs very hard to get a clear not so need to build up some more strength in my left hand so the strings don't twang.
Now many people are going to ask about other brands, like why don’t I suggest Gibson guitars? It really is a personal taste thing, and it’ll ultimately depend on yours. Perhaps by the style of music you play or the artists you admire. For me, Fender guitars represent the best in quality and feel. Many Gibson style guitars have fatter necks, bigger frets, are heavy, and feel and sound “muddy” to me, whereas the feel of a Stratocaster– light, slender, classic– feels, plays, and looks fast.  :)
If you plan to be the more lead-orientated guitarist, good for you. You’ll get more chicks and a higher place in the band pecking order. You shouldn’t however, neglect your chordal playing. A song can exist without lead lines, but not without rhythm. Don’t be fooled, every one of your guitar heroes is invariably a demon on rhythm guitar too. It’s a prerequisite: you have to understand the chords, rhythm, and harmony of a song before you can play any meaningful melody on top of it.
Justin is a phenomenal teacher and this book is great for anyone starting to learn guitar. The book goes perfectly with his Beginner's course but even on its own is a superb tool for beginners. It has a lot of famous songs arranged using simple chords (pitch-perfect renditions I should add). It's filled with useful tips and suggestion to improve your playing and make the sound more authentic even if you are a beginner. I don't think I have seen a better, more beginner friendly guitar songbook out there. I would highly recommend this to anybody learning guitar. It's a must-have if you are learning using Justin's videos.

 Pierre Bensusan on justinguitar.com! Pierre Bensuan (www.pierrebensusan.com) "Lucky you, guitar players from all over the world, to take advantage of the tutorials presented in Justin's comprehensive website! Whatever the style you fancy, Justin is there for you with generous and precise guidance to help you enhance your playing and by doing so, introduce you to so many ways of approaching the guitar and discover new artists along the way. I wish there would have been such a medium and decitated host around when I started to learn how to play. Bravo Justin, and my gratitude for bringing music to the heart and ears of many!"

3/4 Size Acoustic: I also have a 3/4 Scale Guitar in my apartment because they are awesome to sit beside your couch and just pick up easily and jam with. I bought the guitar a few months ago, and when I was playing it a concerned shopper came up to me and reminded me “that’s for kids you know.” I laughed. Fair enough, but I think little guitars are cool to have around the house, so if you do too (or if you have really small hands) perhaps this could be the guitar for you.
This diagram illustrates the first chord we are going to play, a G major chord (often simply called a "G chord"). Take your second finger, and put it on the third fret of the sixth string. Next, take your first finger, and put it on the second fret of the fifth string. Lastly, put your third finger on the third fret of the first string. Make sure all of your fingers are curled and are not touching any strings they're not supposed to. Now, using your pick, strike all six strings in one fluid motion. Notes should ring all together, not one at a time (this could take some practice). Voila! Your first chord.
But than again, JamPlay does have a cool scale library tool (which is great for intermediate-advanced players), the production quality of JamPlay videos is generally higher (the educational value is about the same), and they release more new lessons and mini courses in different genres for intermediate-advanced guitarists, which might make them a better choice if you're an established player.
Copyright © 2019 HubPages Inc. and respective owners. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners. HubPages® is a registered Service Mark of HubPages, Inc. HubPages and Hubbers (authors) may earn revenue on this page based on affiliate relationships and advertisements with partners including Amazon, Google, and others.
Jim Campilongo on justinguitar.com! Jim Campilongo (www.jimcampilongo.com) "Justin is an instructor with that rare combination that encompasses great playing in conjunction with a thoughtful, likable personality. Justin's instruction is extremely intelligent because he's smart enough to know the 'basics' don't have to be served 'raw' - Justin keenly serves the information covered in chocolate. Justin's site is like a free pass in a candy store!"

I decided to try to learn how to play the guitar so I could sing and play with my preschool class. I was getting very frustrated because my fingers would not do what I want them to do. I put the chord buddy on my guitar and could play a dozen songs the first night. Just wish they made more of these in different keys so I did not have to re-key the songs I want to be able to play. It will take some practice because you do have to press down on the tabs very hard to get a clear not so need to build up some more strength in my left hand so the strings don't twang.


The ChordBuddy Guitar Learning System is designed to help you learn to make chords as you learn to play guitar.  The ChordBuddy attaches to the neck of electric or acoustic guitars and guides you through learning basic chord fingering positions.  It works in the key of G and makes the G, C, D, and Em chords.  The included instruction book, songbook, DVD, and two-month lesson plan guides you until you learn to make the chords on your own and you’re ready to remove the “training wheels”.  The ChordBuddy Guitar Learning System is $59.99 at Sharper Image.
Once you’re comfortable playing the chord shape that corresponds to the tab you removed, you can move on to removing the next tab, the next tab, and the next tab. Once all of the tabs are removed, the ultimate goal is that you should have a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts of how to play guitar and shouldn’t require the Chordbuddy anymore. At this point, you can remove the Chordbuddy system completely from your guitar and you’re free to explore.

This is why it’s important to have someone that holds you accountable for prolonging your learning and practicing, regardless of whether it’s a musical instrument, or a sport, or any other after-school matter. Someone to keep you motivated. And if you decide to make your passion a profession, someone to guide you along the way on how to find the right opportunities for paid gigs, or even a full-time career in playing the Guitar.


Start playing the different notes and hold the different shapes. Once you have a basic understanding of how the notes are played throughout the song, you can start to hold each of the chords. If the song consists of chords that you're used to playing, it will make the process easier. If the song uses different chords, it may take some time and adjustment to get used to them. Practice the chords separately if they are unfamiliar to you.[12]

Guitar Gopher....I had walked away from learning guitar with instructor years back, but I had been playing and learning on my own...the sound is there but at times it sucks....we set up practice time with experience players sometimes its above what I know.....so I shy away slowly until I'm outside the building....trying to think what that was all about....but now I've come upon your set of learning the 5 steps to learning guitar...I'll start all over to give a try one more time on your suggestion about playing guitar....thank you for your counseling and giving guidance....you made a great recommendation, thanks for the opinions.
After you are comfortable with the basics, you can move on to learn different styles: blues, country, rock. Each style is explained thoroughly, as well as the techniques that you would use to play each style of music. Another great feature we found was that since each style requires different gear, amp setings, and generally a different tone, Guitar Tricks walks you through getting the right tone for the given style as well.
You will not be billed for this subscription. Subscription will not be automatically renewed. The magazine offer is valid for U.S. subscribers only. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery of your first issue of Bon Appetit magazine. If you have an existing subscription to Bon Appetit magazine, then your subscription will be extended an additional year. Bon Appetit is valued at $12
Once you’re comfortable playing the chord shape that corresponds to the tab you removed, you can move on to removing the next tab, the next tab, and the next tab. Once all of the tabs are removed, the ultimate goal is that you should have a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts of how to play guitar and shouldn’t require the Chordbuddy anymore. At this point, you can remove the Chordbuddy system completely from your guitar and you’re free to explore.
Saw you with the Pure and Simple Band at The Terrace at Grove Park the evening of Dec. 13. I am wondering if you attended Enterprise Jr College years ago. I was secretary to Tommy Johnson, Dean of Students, from 1977-1993 and am wondering if you were one of our bus drivers. When the band leader introduced the band members, your name stuck in my head.
I love love love these guitars. No gimmicks. They are pure class (but are capable of absolute fury!) :) Think a Telecaster can’t rock? Johnny Greenwood respectfully disagrees. Check out Bonnie Raitt using a Strat to lay down some nasty slide licks. SRV nearly tears the strings off his Strat. Would you prefer something a little funkier? Here’s Prince playing the greatest guitar solo of all time on a Telecaster.
×