Saw you with the Pure and Simple Band at The Terrace at Grove Park the evening of Dec. 13. I am wondering if you attended Enterprise Jr College years ago. I was secretary to Tommy Johnson, Dean of Students, from 1977-1993 and am wondering if you were one of our bus drivers. When the band leader introduced the band members, your name stuck in my head.
For students who have long thought about picking up the acoustic or electric guitar, this course will provide an easy-access foundation that will get you playing. When first learning guitar, it is important to have the material presented in stages, in an enjoyable way that allows you to grasp the basics of the instrument and music. The course begins simply with the parts of the guitar, the names of the strings, tuning, and technique—whether finger-style or pick. It then explores the basics of music theory with such topics as scales, triads, power chords, and fingering and shapes.

Now this of course does not mean that we won’t do songs, as playing your favorite songs is a very fun and good part of playing guitar. What this means is that instead of falling into the trap of just learning one song, then another, then another and never actually learning how things work, we will be sure to show you HOW SONGS WORK so that when you learn or play a song you can learn it by understanding the core idea of the song instead of trying to memorize the several hundred individual notes that are inside of the song.  Basically, we will make sure you understand how music works so that you are free to have fun not just learning and memorizing songs, but also by playing on the fly or writing your own songs!
Learn how to read tabs. Tabs will have six lines that represent your strings, along with numbers that designate where you should be placing your fingers. The numbers represent the fret in which you need to hold the string down. A 1 means the first fret, a 2 means the second fret, and so on. Numbers in a progression mean that you hold down the first individual fret and pick the note, then move to the next one, and so on in succession. Numbers on the same vertical line are meant to be played together simultaneously as a chord.[10]

Guitar Tricks is described as a 'step-by-step curriculum' and it really does live up to that phrase. I appreciate the simplicity of the step-by-step nature in the structure of the site and the way all the classes and songs I watched were presented. You know exactly where to go next (although of course you are not limited to the pathway – you are free to go wherever you like and explore, return, repeat as much as you like).
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
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