@John Dyhouse: The thing about the chord buddy that is unique is that you can teach yourself quickly. yes you will need to build up your finger pad but you will need to do that anyway without the chord buddy. The main purpose of it is to teach you hand placement, sound, and rythmn first. Then after you have mastered that you can move on to learning more on the topic you are discussing.
There really isn't a best age for kids to start guitar lessons, but most children under the age of 7 generally don't have the dexterity or patience needed to learn to play the guitar. With persistence and motivation some kids have learned to play guitar at some impressively young ages, but it really comes down to is the individual attitude and maturity level of the student. 

After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.
Whilst the experienced lessons focus on the three genres specifically to take you from basic to advanced, further genres are accessed below in a tab called 'Styles'. (This is the same webpage accessed by the 4th area called 'Learn Styles of Guitar' on the home page.) The additional genres are Acoustic, Bluegrass, Classical, Funk and Soul, Jazz, Metal, Rockabilly, Surf, and finally, World.

The videos for the lessons all have great pictures, and you can pick between low, medium, and high resolution. They are clearly recorded in a proper and professional studio. They do their best to show you tabs on the side to get a better idea of what the instructor is playing. There also doesn't seem to be as many "far-away" shots during the lessons. A "far-away" shot is one of my personal pet-peeves on instructional sites.

Ideally, most people would prefer to be able to take lessons in the style of music that they enjoy the most, and that is one of the things you will get with Guitar Tricks. This will enable you to learn just about every level of guitar skill and technique for any type of music. According to a vast number of past and current students who have experienced this type of training, “…it is the best way to learn!”


Hey Jared, I just had a look at Jamorama recently, since they upgraded their offering not long ago. They used to sell a guitar lesson ebook which was created over a decade ago, so it was pretty old to say the least. They launched the new site 2 months ago, and are now focusing on video lessons, just like Jamplay and Guitartricks. I had a good look around Jamorama, and to tell you the truth, it’s not looking very good:
Tony started playing guitar at the age of 14. At age 18 he relocated to Minneapolis, Minnesota to attend Music Tech of Minneapolis. Through the years he has played throughout the upper midwest and most currently in the Ark-La-Tex area, With his band, SUPERUNKNOWN. Tony teaches all styles of Rock, Metal, Blues, Progressive, Latin Rock and Classical.
There is no way to mark or loop song sub-sections, so it is hunt and guess tryin to find the section you want to repeat without wasting time listening to the irrelevant taking and or parts you already know again and again . The theory may be interesting , but should come in separate sections, NOT in the middle of trying to learn to play a part of the song. Songs should be broken down into smaller sections for learning , or have ability to mark and loop sub-sections so you can repeat as needed.
Our highly-trained professional instructors teach guitar lessons to beginners starting with the fundamentals, including scales, chords, tuning, arpeggios and rhythm. They then use famous rock songs to help guide guitar students through the early stages of musical development. Our beginner guitar lessons inspire creativity and help develop new students into world-class players with weekly private guitar lessons and group rehearsals. School of Rock's core philosophy is that the best way for students to gain musical proficiency is through performance-based music education. All of our lessons for guitar students include a performance aspect.
It’s important to realize there is a fine line between challenging yourself with music that is slightly above your ability, and frustrating yourself with music you have no logical reason to expect yourself to be able to play just yet. This line is different for each new guitarist. Some may work on basic chords for years, and be happy enough with that. Others may dive neck-deep into some fairy difficult music and thrive on the challenge it provides. Point is, go at your own pace, and don’t ever feel like you need to take on more of a challenge than you are ready for.

Since the website was born back in 1998, the quality of the lessons vary. The older lessons don’t have that good video and sound quality, but we only experienced this on about 1-3% of all of the lessons during our review, the rest are in HD. Each lesson has reference material, such as tabs and chord charts, which can all be downloaded in pdf format for easy printing.
The simplest answer and the one that no student that ever wants to hear is practice. Changing chords is the process where many beginners fail, and quit. But after that, the rewards will be simply impressive. There are a few tricks to get a chord transition to happen faster. Use a metronome: Set it on four beats and set it as fast or as slow as you want. Then get a chord in your mind, say D. When the metronome reaches its last beat, press down the strings. When it happens again, strum it and let it free. Then again. Do this 10 to 20 minutes a day and in less than a week, the chord progression will begin to sound much better.

Now, pick up your guitar, and hold it so the back of the body of the instrument comes in contact with your stomach/chest, and the bottom of the neck runs parallel to the floor. The thickest string on the guitar should be the closest to your face, while the thinnest should be closest to the floor. If this isn't the case, turn the guitar the in other direction. Typically, a right-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the left, whereas a left-handed person will hold the guitar so the headstock points to the right.


Minutes 60-600. Pick up the guitar everyday for 20 days for 30 minutes or so. You can do this while you do other things like watch TV or chit chat. Get your fingers used to moving around on the fretboard. Start jamming out some John Denver baby. Please do sing along. Eventually try to keep up with tempo of the changes in the actual song. Once you can change your chords on time, focus on improving your “touch” with your right hand. Strum the chords in a way that it adds texture to the recording (if you are playing along with the man himself.)
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