Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.
Learning guitar is a lot easier when you have a step-by-step system to follow. Guitar Tricks lessons are interconnected and organized to get slightly harder as you progress. You watch a video lesson, play along, and then click a “Next” button to go to the next lesson. Lessons have multiple camera angles, guitar tabs, jam tracks and everything else you need to learn.
Because people learn in a variety of different ways, the flexibility of the online guitar lessons that you choose will be important. You may prefer to progress through a series of programs or you may want to jump around and pick whatever interests you. Not all online guitar lessons work in the same way, so you will want to consider which programs offer the best “fit” for the way you learn best.
Throughout the Beginner Guitar Quick-Start Series, we’ll include the most important things you need to know be successful at playing guitar right away. First we’ll cover basics like how to tune your guitar, how to hold your guitar, and the parts of the guitar. After that, we’ll get into technique, how to strum, how to make your first chords, and how to play your first song.

Of course any great site for online guitar lessons is going to have a great toolbox at your disposal. GuitarTricks has a tuner, chord finder, scale finder, metronome, a fretboard trainer, and best of all a jam station. This provides numerous jams and backing tracks in a variety of styles, keys, and genres. This is one of my favorite tools, as a songwriter this is not only how I build my playing skills, but how I get new ideas for songs I write.


It shouldn’t be a surprise that students learn faster when taking private guitar lessons or classes, compared to watching video tutorials or YouTube videos. Finding a specialized teacher - whether in-home, studio, or online classes - for one-on-one guitar tutoring will give you the feedback and personal attention you need to become the best guitar player you can be!
Lesson pages also feel similar in layout to what you would find on the leading tutorial sites such as GuitarTricks and JamPlay. The majority of lessons – whether song, chord or technique – follow a similar structure. On the lesson page you will find the video lesson itself, as well as some accompanying tips and text including notes on the song and the chords used.
There really isn't a best age for kids to start guitar lessons, but most children under the age of 7 generally don't have the dexterity or patience needed to learn to play the guitar. With persistence and motivation some kids have learned to play guitar at some impressively young ages, but it really comes down to is the individual attitude and maturity level of the student. 
While the average viewership of six million may watch the show for the entertainment, it also provides a weekly education on how to successfully sell your product to high-profile prospects. And believe it or not, we can take away a lot of sales lessons from those success stories. Below I’ve identified the top 5 most successful Shark Tank businesses and what we can learn from them.
Surprisingly, for a free site, Justin Guitar offers a few free tools and apps to help guitarists with their lessons. The most interesting of these are the series of apps available for download on the iTunes store (so they will only work with iOS). These include a Time Trainer Metronome, a Guitar Note Trainer, and a Blues Lick app – which brings together Justin’s weekly Blues Lick series.

In 2007 he started Chocolate Cake Productions with friend Jed Wardley to release his instructional DVDs. By June 2012 there are 11 DVDs available, including "Master The Major Scale", "Really Useful Strumming Techniques", a "Solo Blues Guitar" series, "The JustinGuitar Beginner's Course" and "Intermediate Method". Sandercoe also publishes a number of electronic books in .pdf format, including "Practical Music Theory", "The Chord Construction Guide" and "Understanding Rhythm Notation", as well as an ongoing series of instructional songbooks, to which entries include the Vintage Songbook, the Rock Songbook, the Pop Songbook, and the Acoustic Songbook.


Jamplay is often considered as the main competitor of Guitar Tricks (see our Jamplay review here). In my opinion, both Jamplay and Guitar Tricks are top of their game. They have many fantastic things in common and each appeal to a wide range of guitarists at all levels. There are some differences of course and these potentially make one more appealing to you than the other; for a step-by-step, see our GuitarTricks vs Jamplay Review, where I discuss which one is best for you.
This course is completely free, but please consider making a donation or buying some my products in the official store if you dig it - your support enables me to keep expanding and improving the courses for everyone! My Practical Music Theory Course is also great for those that really want to understand what they're doing - the early grades are free to check out too!
Accessible from the left sidebar, the Beginner’s Course features nine main stages (eleven if you include the initial module and the new ‘Master Rock Power Chords’ stage), with more than 100 video lessons in total. This course starts with the essential basics – such as the guitar’s anatomy and how to tune the instrument – before moving through chords, power chords, picking exercises, practice schedules and more.
This guitar trick is a variation on artificial harmonics, which itself is a variation on natural harmonics. The natural harmonics are most commonly played on the 5th, 7th, and 12th frets. To play these, you lightly press the left hand on top of the fret without pressing the string to the fret. Then, you pick the note. To make an artificial harmonic, you regularly fret a note with the left hand and then use your right hand index finger to lightly press on that string twelve frets above the fretted note. Then, you pick the string. With this technique, you have to hold the pick between the thumb and middle finger. Finally, to play harp artificial harmonics, you alternate plucking a note using the right hand ring or pinky finger with picking artificial harmonics. This creates a harp-like sound! This technique works well when you can fret a chord using four or more strings without repeating any notes. The video below shows the great guitarist Lenny Breau describing how to accomplish this:
Use tabs instead of sheet music. If you don't already know how to read music, it can take a lot of time to memorize and proficiently read sheet music. Tabs are an easier and more intuitive way to write music for beginners that doesn't require any formal education. Tabs will simply tell you where to put your fingers on a fret board and how to generally play a song.[9]
Realistically, to start improving on guitar, you're going to need to set aside a bit of time to practice. Developing a daily routine is a good idea. Plan to spend at least 15 minutes daily practicing all you've learned will really help. At first, your fingers will be sore, but by playing daily, they'll toughen up, and in a short amount of time, they'll stop hurting. The following list should give you an idea of how to spend your practice time:

4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.

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